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Melbourne is fighting a second wave of coronavirus and the Sydney pub group is rising to nine cases

‘Dead are a reality’: top doctor’s chilling warning as Melbourne battles a second wave of coronavirus and Sydney’s pub clusters rise to nine cases

  • Deputy medical chief has warned that the death toll in Australia could increase further
  • Dr. Nick Coatsworth’s Sunday warning came when a man died in Victoria

The deputy chief physician has warned that the death toll could increase further in Australia, given the rising number of COVID-19 infections in Victoria, and concerns about a potential cluster linked to a pub in Sydney.

Dr. Nick Coatsworth’s warning on Sunday came when a man in his seventies died in Victoria and brought the national death toll to 108. The state reported the death of a 90-year-old man on Saturday.

“Deaths are a reality of COVID-19, they are the reality of a pandemic,” said Dr. Coatsworth to reporters in Canberra.

“The death toll may rise, no doubt about it.”

An 18-year-old employee has been confirmed among the now nine cases in the cluster The Crossroads Hotel in Casula in southwest Sydney

An 18-year-old employee has been confirmed among the now nine cases in the cluster The Crossroads Hotel in Casula in southwest Sydney

A man in his seventies died and another 273 cases of coronavirus were identified at night in Victoria, as the state is affected by a second wave of the disease

A man in his seventies died and another 273 cases of coronavirus were identified at night in Victoria, as the state is affected by a second wave of the disease

A man in his seventies died and another 273 cases of coronavirus were identified at night in Victoria, as the state is affected by a second wave of the disease

But he said Australia had learned a lot during the pandemic and could have prevented the large numbers of deaths abroad, especially among older members of the community.

Victoria reported a further 279 COVID-19 cases, after 216 reported on Saturday and a record 288 infections on Friday. The state registered more than 1,000 cases in the past week.

There are 57 Victorians in the hospital with COVID-19, including 16 remaining in intensive care, Prime Minister Daniel Andrews confirmed on Sunday morning.

As part of efforts to limit the spread of the virus, Mr. Andrews said schools would close from July 20 and return to online classes, while students from kindergarten to grade 10 in closed suburbs will have a third week of school vacation this week .

Mr. Andrews said he would not be at risk for some 700,000 children and their parents who commute to and from school as the virus spreads through the community.

Mr Andrews confirmed that schools would reopen from Monday, but only for students in grades 11 or 12 in the closed suburbs of Victoria.

Face-to-face learning is also available for certain group 10 students, children with special needs and those whose parents cannot work from home.

“Keeping children away from school at home was an essential part of slowing the spread of the coronavirus earlier, and it will be vital to our efforts,” he said.

NSW registered five new cases, and authorities in the state are concerned about community transfer, most notably a cluster from a Sydney pub.

Victorians living in metropolitan Melbourne and the Mitchell Shire are currently in the midst of a second enclosure in an effort to stem the spread of the virus.

The reclassification of measures into parts of the state means that people can only leave their home for four essential purposes: groceries, daily exercise, to give or receive care and to go to school or work.

An 18-year-old employee has been confirmed among the now nine cases in the Crossroads Hotel cluster in Casula in southwest Sydney.

Dr. Coatsworth said that people who visited the pub between July 3 and 10 should immediately isolate themselves and be tested for COVID-19 regardless of their symptoms.

That includes people who have now left NSW and truck drivers who are known to frequent the location.

“Without using the obvious pun, we are certainly at a crossroads in NSW,” Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian told reporters.

She said NSW had the opportunity to oppose the community transfer or the road to Victoria, therefore the number of overseas flights would be limited and quarantined returning travelers to hotels as agreed by the National Cabinet on Friday.

A medical worker is shown performing a COVID-19 test.  Melbourne has entered the third lockdown restrictions again

A medical worker is shown performing a COVID-19 test.  Melbourne has entered the third lockdown restrictions again

A medical worker is shown performing a COVID-19 test. Melbourne has entered the third lockdown restrictions again

Returning travelers will be charged $ 3000 for an adult, up to $ 5000 for a family of four.

“We think this is fair,” Berejiklian told reporters in Sydney.

Residents of Australia abroad have had three or four months to think about what they want to do. What we need to do is protect our citizens and place resources where they are most needed, and that’s in community tracing. ‘

Union leader Anthony Albanese supports the decision of the national cabinet, but hopes that no one will endanger his health by delaying a return to Australia because of the cost of quarantine.

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