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Police officers armed with RBT equipment will be in the parking areas of the train station to lure drivers who only partially do the right thing (stock image)

The police change course before the long weekend of spring racing through Australia – including the Melbourne Cup on Tuesday – to stop more road deaths.

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Police officers armed with RBT equipment will be in the parking places of the train station to lure drivers who only partially do the right thing.

While revelers often leave their cars at the train station as they go to the races, they often slip up while picking up their car – making them the often short journey home while still having the legal alcohol limit for blood.

Police officers armed with RBT equipment will be in the parking areas of the train station to lure drivers who only partially do the right thing (stock image)

Police officers armed with RBT equipment will be in the parking areas of the train station to lure drivers who only partially do the right thing (stock image)

While revelers often leave their cars at the train station while they go to the races, they often slip by collecting their car. Pictured: the implementation of the Melbourne Cup 2018

While revelers often leave their cars at the train station while they go to the races, they often slip by collecting their car. Pictured: the implementation of the Melbourne Cup 2018

While revelers often leave their cars at the train station while they go to the races, they often slip by collecting their car. Pictured: the implementation of the Melbourne Cup 2018

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& # 39; We all need to think about how we plan our trip, make sure that when we go to the races, we don't leave our car and drive back over the limit of the parking lot. The police will be there when you get there, & # 39; said Labor MP Lisa Neville on Wednesday and launched a police operation.

Officers will be on the roads and at the last addition, train parking, across Victoria.

Nearly 230 people died on Victorian roads this year, that's 57 more lives than last year.

At this rate, an estimated 30 to 40 people will die by the new year, Ms. Neville said.

& # 39; We want to get through this long weekend … without losing a life, & # 39; she said.

Assistant Commissioner Stephen Leane said that the best intentions of people at the start of the day were often spoiled with last-minute changes.

& # 39; If you do something stupid on our ways for our officers, we would be happy to give you a ticket or a summons and send you to court in the coming weeks & # 39 ;, he said and encouraged people to come home safely .

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The operation runs from Friday to late on Tuesday and focuses on violations of the driver.

It comes after a series of other traffic laws were crushed by Australian drivers.

Enraged motorists have overthrown the ridiculous traffic rule that could make you lose your driver's license at a fast-food drive-in.

Officers will be on the roads and at the last addition, train parking, over Victoria (stock image)

Officers will be on the roads and at the last addition, train parking, over Victoria (stock image)

Officers will be on the roads and at the last addition, train parking, over Victoria (stock image)

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Driving laws throughout Australia can give motorists a fine of up to $ 484 and lose up to five points if they pay via a drive-in through their phone.

The law was emphasized by a Victoria Police poll, where drivers expressed their anger about the rule.

& # 39; Does this mean I can pull the handbrake, turn off the car at traffic lights and use my phone? I hope this is a joke, & a user wrote.

& # 39; You cannot seriously claim that using a cell phone to pay for food is too dangerous, but leaning out of the car window (often with both hands) to collect your food, drink or whatever, & # 39; another answered.

Drivers in Victoria can be fined $ 484 and will lose four penalty points if they are caught paying for food with their phones.

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The law also applies to the rest of Australia, with fines and points for anyone caught paying with their phone.

Driving laws throughout Australia mean that motorists can get a fine of up to $ 484 and lose up to five points if they pay via a drive-in through their phone (stock image)

Driving laws throughout Australia mean that motorists can get a fine of up to $ 484 and lose up to five points if they pay via a drive-in through their phone (stock image)

Driving laws throughout Australia mean that motorists can get a fine of up to $ 484 and lose up to five points if they pay via a drive-in through their phone (stock image)

Drivers can also be fined $ 344 and beaten with three points for attaching stickers to their rear windows or hanging down fluffy dice on their rear-view mirrors.

The obscure and draconian traffic rule prohibits all trinkets that may obscure the driver's view and possibly cause an accident.

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Police and road safety groups from all but one of the Australian states have confirmed to Daily Mail Australia that such items may constitute a traffic violation. And that they are now looking forward to this & # 39; driver distraction & # 39; offenses.

Such items – including air fresheners, flags, toys, etc. – are not strictly prohibited for cars, but may result in a fine if the police consider them to be obstacles.

Placing a GPS somewhere other than the lower center or lower right of the windscreen can also attract a fine for similar reasons.

South Australian police commander, inspector Bob Gray, said his officers were specifically focused on distraction from the driver.

Drivers can be fined up to $ 344 and beaten with three points for hanging air fresheners or downy dice on their rearview mirror

& # 39; Cell phones, GPS devices and other technology or items in the car can be a big distraction for drivers and divert their attention from the task they have to do & he said.

Bij When mounting your GPS display or adding decorative items such as fluffy dice or stickers, consider whether this will obstruct your view. It is important that drivers have a good view of the road, the front, back and sides at all times. & # 39;

Motorists who drive without getting a clear view will receive a fine of $ 193 plus a contribution of $ 60 to the victims of the criminal charge.

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