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The Melbourne Cup drew its lowest crowd (pictured on Tuesday) in 24 years amid animal abuse concerns, as activists say it will soon be banned forever

The Melbourne Cup attracted its lowest audience in 24 years amid concerns about animal abuse.

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There were 81,408 spectators at the Flemington Racecourse on Tuesday, the lowest number since 74,843 went through the turnstiles in 1995.

Turnout has now fallen four years in a row since it turned out to be 101,015 in 2015.

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The Melbourne Cup drew its lowest crowd (pictured on Tuesday) in 24 years amid animal abuse concerns, as activists say it will soon be banned forever

The Melbourne Cup drew its lowest crowd (pictured on Tuesday) in 24 years amid animal abuse concerns, as activists say it will soon be banned forever

Animal rights activists, pointing out that six horses were killed as a result of injuries while racing in the cup since 2013, put the decline down on increasing awareness about animal welfare and cruelty.

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Emily Rice, the head of animal rights group PETA, told Daily Mail Australia: & # 39; The days of the Melbourne Cup are numbered & # 39 ;.

The race came two weeks after an ABC documentary broadcast horrific images of more than 300 retired racehorses being taken to a slaughterhouse in southeast Queensland.

The program caused much outrage, with thousands of viewers promising never to attend a horse race again.

A popular pub in Perth, The Rosemount Hotel, made headlines because he refused to show the Melbourne Cup after the program was broadcast.

& # 39; In recent decades, much worrying news has appeared about the treatment of horses in the horse racing industry & # 39 ;, the hotel said in a statement.

The Victorian Racing Commission, which promised an additional $ 25 million for racehorse welfare in response to the documentary, kept quiet about the decline of the public and did not answer the calls from Daily Mail Australia.

Activists who vigorously campaigned for a boycott of the race say that their supporters are increasing in number every year.

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& # 39; The crowd of protesters gets bigger and louder & # 39 ;, Rice said after hundreds of campaigners protested with Flemions and Protestants outside of Flemington on Tuesday.

A domino effect of a lower number of visitors seems to be a decrease in betting, since Tabcorp recorded a 7.8 percent drop in sales at the Cup last year to $ 106 million.

There were 81,408 racegoers (photo) at the Flemington Racecourse on Tuesday, the lowest number since 74,843 went through the turnstiles in 1995

There were 81,408 racegoers (photo) at the Flemington Racecourse on Tuesday, the lowest number since 74,843 went through the turnstiles in 1995

There were 81,408 racegoers (photo) at the Flemington Racecourse on Tuesday, the lowest number since 74,843 went through the turnstiles in 1995

Bookmakers admitted that fewer people placed bets – although the decrease is partly due to tax changes.

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Since January 1, online bookmakers are taxed in the state where the bet is placed instead of where they have their license, a move that has depressed profits and meant that the bookies offered fewer increased chances to attract customers.

The Melbourne Cup is not the only race that has suffered decrease in the number of visitors.

The Caulfield Cup drew 28,000 this year compared to 29,500 in 2018, while only 80,000 Flemington came in on Saturday for the Victoria Derby, 10,000 fewer than last year – although this could be due to the fact that gamblers turn the wet weather away.

Why is the number of racing driving falling?

There were 81,408 racegoers at Flemington Racecourse on Tuesday, the lowest number since 74,843 went through the tourniquets in 1995.

Turnout has now fallen four years in a row since it turned out to be 101,015 in 2015.

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The main theory for the decline is that more people are becoming aware of animal welfare and believe that the race supports animal abuse.

Another theory is that increasing competition with races in New South Wales has led to Victoria races having a smaller crowd.

Alternatively, the decline can simply be a cyclical blip and the numbers can increase in the future.

The decrease may also be due to increasing competition for crowds of races in New South Wales, because Racing NSW had deliberately planned races to clash with those in Victoria.

The inaugural Golden Eagle at Rosehill Gardens in Sydney clashed with the Victoria Derby and attracted 20,756 gamblers.

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Meanwhile, & # 39; the world's richest grass race, Everest in Sydney, had a larger audience than last year with 40,912 compared to 40,578 – although the event took place before the ABC documentary.

On Tuesday, hundreds of demonstrators gathered in a peaceful anti-cruelty demonstration with live music and costumes.

Winning horse Vow And Declare & co-owner, former NSW politician Geoff Corrigan, acknowledged that recent allegations of animal abuse had led to protest.

& # 39; There is a social contract with racing, & # 39; said Corrigan.

& # 39; That social contract has been slightly broken in the last two weeks. & # 39;

But Mr. Corrigan said he was very pleased with the efforts of Racing Victoria, Racing NSW and Racing Queensland to tackle anti-cruelty issues.

And the winning trainer Danny O & # 39; Brien does not believe that the Melbourne Cup Carnival has lost its luster even as the Sydney racing authorities step up spring competition between states.

& # 39; I have been all over the world for English derby & # 39; s from Royal Ascot to the Kentucky Derby, but nothing comes close.

Vow and Declare (pictured as winner of the Melbourne Cup on the far right) was considered one of Australia's best hopes of defeating a field full of international contenders

Vow and Declare (pictured as winner of the Melbourne Cup on the far right) was considered one of Australia's best hopes of defeating a field full of international contenders

Vow and Declare (pictured as winner of the Melbourne Cup on the far right) was considered one of Australia's best hopes of defeating a field full of international contenders

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& # 39; You have an entire city that stops, the rest of the country too. & # 39;

Sydneysider, Mr. Corrigan, argued for a time-out of rivalry between states.

& # 39; I don't think there is a future to organize more and more of these races that are dragging the states apart and competing with each other.

& # 39; I think there must be a return to tradition and common sense. There is only so much money and it will eventually collapse if they keep doing it. & # 39;

The ABC The October documentary was the result of a two-year investigation.

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The official data from Racing Australia claimed that about 34 race horses end up in slaughterhouses every year.

But Elio Celotto from the Coalition for the Protection of Racehorses told the ABC that around 4,000 racehorses had been killed in one slaughterhouse alone.

Disturbing images (above) show that hundreds of healthy racehorses are being abused and massacred

Disturbing images (above) show that hundreds of healthy racehorses are being abused and massacred

Disturbing images (above) show that hundreds of healthy racehorses are being abused and massacred

That slaughterhouse – located in southeastern Queensland – was the focus of the broadcaster's investigation and was infiltrated with hidden cameras.

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The cameras showed that in just 22 days, more than 300 racehorses, who together won $ 5 million in prize money, were killed.

Mr Celotto said that even from the property boundary, hundreds of horses can be seen, unloaded and abused by employees.

A shocking vision showed workers in the slaughterhouse who abused the horses, beat them, kicked them and even shouted abuse at them.

Recent Melbourne Cup daily rush

2019 – 81,408

2018 – 83,471

2017 – 90,536

2016 – 97,479

2015 – 101,015

2014 – 100,794

2013 – 104,169

2012 – 106,162

2011 – 105,979

2010 – 110,223

2009 – 102,161

2008 – 107,280

2007 – 102,411

2006 – 106,691

2005 – 106,479

2004 – 98,161

2003 – 122,736 (record public)

2002 – 102,533

2001 – 101.201

2000 – 121,015

1999 – 104,028

1998 – 100,607

1997 – 94.143

1996 – 90,149

1995 – 74,843

Source: Flemington.com.au

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