Melbourne anti-vax protesters slammed by tradie delaying vaccine before hospitalization

Anti-vaxtradie who nearly died of Covid-19 and infected his daughters lashes out at ‘dumb’ protesters, reveals how a chance meeting with a patient in hospital changed his view of the jab

  • Tradie slammed anti-vaccination protesters after organizing demonstrations in Melbourne
  • Nathan Chellia was hospitalized after avoiding the Covid-19 vaccine
  • He watched rallies unfold as he continued to recover from crippling symptoms
  • “I yell and yell while watching TV because they are stupid,” he said










A tradie who avoided the Covid-19 shot before being hospitalized with the virus has knocked down ‘dumb’ anti-vaccination protesters in Melbourne.

Father-of-two Nathan Chellia fought for his life from a bed at Northern Hospital, in Epping, for a fortnight before being released on September 13.

The 44-year-old was still recovering from the debilitating illness at home when the first violent anti-vaccination rally took place in the Victorian capital on Saturday.

“I yell and yell while watching the TV because they are stupid,” he said The Herald Sun.

Mr Chellia suffered from shortness of breath, high fever, severe vomiting and weight loss after contracting the virus.

His symptoms increased to the point where he thought he would die — prompting him to update his will.

Mr Chellia was alone in the Covid ward and could not be visited by his family. To make matters worse, his two, four-year-old daughters had also contracted the virus.

Nathan Chellia fought for his life from a bed at Northern Hospital, in Epping, for 14 days before being released on September 13.

The 44-year-old was still recovering from the debilitating illness at home as violent anti-vaccination rallies began to unfold in Melbourne on Saturday (pictured, protests on Wednesday)

The 44-year-old was still recovering from the debilitating illness at home as violent anti-vaccination rallies began to unfold in Melbourne on Saturday (pictured, protests on Wednesday)

“As I lay down, I think if I had had one shot, I wouldn’t have gotten to this point,” he said.

Chellia watched as protesters stormed the CFMEU building on Monday and flooded the Shrine of Remembrance on Wednesday.

“They don’t know what they’re doing, they don’t know the reality of what’s happening.”

Mr Chellia works as a health and safety officer at the Panorama construction site in Box Hill.

He had delayed getting the shot before coming into contact with an infected worker who wasn’t wearing a mask. The man explained that he thought he was a “superman” who could not be harmed by the virus.

The pair shook hands and the brief encounter lasted long enough for the infection to pass before it quickly got hold of Mr Chellia.

On August 29, he had a sore throat and went to a clinic for a Covid-19 test.

On September 1, Mr Chellia was paralyzed by fever, difficulty breathing and mobility problems.

He was transported by ambulance to hospital where he was warned by doctors that his symptoms would only get worse.

Chellia slammed anti-vaccine protesters after being paralyzed by virus and spent two weeks in hospital

Chellia slammed anti-vaccine protesters after being paralyzed by virus and spent two weeks in hospital

Protesters march through the streets of Melbourne on Wednesday with one holding the Australian maritime flag - a symbol often adopted by conspiracy theorists in the 'sovereign citizen movement'.

Protesters march through the streets of Melbourne on Wednesday with one holding the Australian maritime flag – a symbol often adopted by conspiracy theorists in the ‘sovereign citizen movement’.

At one point, Mr. Chellia believed he was going to die. He called his lawyer to update his will.

The father of two children noticed that another patient was admitted to the ward. But they were released after a short three-day visit.

Mr. Chellia asked the nurses for an explanation. They told him that the patient had received their first dose of the vaccine, which reduced the severity of their symptoms.

“It’s my own fault,” he said. “In my mind, I didn’t really believe the vaccine could help.”

Chellia said he postponed the vaccination because he thought the virus was only dangerous for older residents.

He admitted that the near-death experience prompted him to take social distancing and wearing masks more seriously.

More than 600 protesters have been arrested since the demonstrations began on Saturday.

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