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The Duchess of Sussex was in deep conversation with a group of people while touring the Victoria Yards in Johannesburg

Meghan Markle visits Johannesburg Art Studio without Archie or Prince Harry in last engagement on a royal African tour

  • Meghan saw a conversation with a group of people during a tour through the Victoria Yards in Johannesburg
  • She was without Archie and Harry, who tried his hand at photography earlier today and launched a campaign
  • Meghan, dressed in a navy dress, mingled and chatted with artists on the eight day of the royal African tour
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Meghan Markle today visited an art studio in Johannesburg without Archie or Prince Harry in the latest engagement on the African tour.

The Duchess of Sussex was in deep conversation with a group of people while touring the Victoria Yards in Johannesburg.

But Meghan was without baby Archie and Prince Harry, who tried his hand at photography earlier today when he launched a campaign with National Geographic to raise awareness of the role trees play in the Earth's ecosystem.

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Meghan, dressed in a navy long dress and red slip on shoes, mixed and chatted with the artists on the eight days of the royal African tour.

The Duchess of Sussex was in deep conversation with a group of people while touring the Victoria Yards in Johannesburg

The Duchess of Sussex was in deep conversation with a group of people while touring the Victoria Yards in Johannesburg

Meghan talks to artists on the Victoria Yards while a group of kids in the neighborhood play on a swing on the eight-day Royals Africa tour

Meghan talks to artists on the Victoria Yards while a group of kids in the neighborhood play on a swing on the eight-day Royals Africa tour

Meghan talks to artists on the Victoria Yards while a group of kids in the neighborhood play on a swing on the eight-day Royals Africa tour

A smiling Meghan watches intently while a woman recites from a book and a nearby man plays a tune on the saxophone

A smiling Meghan watches intently while a woman recites from a book and a nearby man plays a tune on the saxophone

A smiling Meghan watches intently while a woman recites from a book and a nearby man plays a tune on the saxophone

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The Duke of Sussex shared an image of Baobab trees that he took during a visit to Liwonde National Park, Malawi on the eighth day of the royal tour through Africa.

One photo shared with the National Geographic Instagram account left Harry lying on the floor with the camera stuck, and the other the photo he took of the trees above.

The prince today manages the magazine's social media platform to run the & # 39; Lookup & # 39; campaign. and will invite users to share their own photos of trees from all over the world.

He wrote: & # 39; Hello everyone! I am so happy that I had the opportunity to continue working with National Geographic and to edit this Instagram account; it's one of my personal favorites.

Today I am in Liwonde National Park, Malawi, an important stop on our official tour through South Africa, planting trees for The Queens Commonwealth Canopy.

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& # 39; As part of this acquisition, I invite you to participate in our social campaign & # 39; Looking Up & # 39 ;. To start the campaign, here's a photo I took today here in Liwonde of Baobab trees. & # 39;

He added: & # 39; I will post my favorite images of @ NatGeo photographers here all day, and on @sussexroyal I will share some of my favorite images of everything you post. I can't wait to see what you see. & # 39;

The campaign launch is coming. It comes when the prince insisted on protecting nature & # 39; fundamental to our survival & # 39; and not if & # 39; hippie & # 39; must be disposed of.

Harry is currently on the eighth day of his official tour in Africa.

Harry and Meghan have their own Instagram account, where they share charities and upload recent photos of their son Archie.

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Buckingham Palace said that Harry & # 39; s passion for trees and forests & # 39; is inspired by the work he does on behalf of his grandmother, Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. & # 39;

The & # 39; Queens Commonwealth Canopy & # 39; was launched in 2015, when Commonwealth countries were invited to submit forests and national parks or plant trees to preserve in the name of the queen.

Nearly 50 countries are participating and have already dedicated native forest to conservation, or have committed to planting millions of new trees to combat climate change.

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