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Peter Dunne (photo), 48, was so frustrated when he missed the ferry home to Cremorne Point on Sydney's Lower North Shore that he was looking for a different way to get to work.

Meet the man who is so busy with the daily commuter traffic that he wants to swim across Sydney harbor to get started – even though the water is full of deadly bull sharks

  • Man is frustrated by his commuter traffic and wants to swim over the harbor of Sydney
  • Peter Dunne spent his childhood in the water and is a long-distance swimmer
  • The 48-year-old now wants to swim 1.5 km to work across the harbor every day
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A man is so frustrated with his daily travel that he wants to swim across Sydney Harbor to get to work, even though it is full of deadly bull sharks.

Peter Dunne, 48, was frustrated this week when he missed the ferry to Cremorne Point on Sydney & # 39; s Lower North Shore.

The long-distance swimmer said he preferred to jump into the water with his glasses and waterproof backpack and make the 1.5-kilometer trip across the harbor.

Peter Dunne (photo), 48, was so frustrated when he missed the ferry home to Cremorne Point on Sydney's Lower North Shore that he was looking for a different way to get to work.

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Peter Dunne (photo), 48, was so frustrated when he missed the ferry home to Cremorne Point on Sydney's Lower North Shore that he was looking for a different way to get to work.

A man is so frustrated by his daily commute that he wants to swim across Sydney harbor to get to work, even though it is littered with deadly bull sharks

A man is so frustrated by his daily commute that he wants to swim across Sydney harbor to get to work, even though it is littered with deadly bull sharks

A man is so frustrated by his daily commute that he wants to swim across Sydney harbor to get to work, even though it is littered with deadly bull sharks

& # 39; The idea came when I realized I wasn't going to take the ferry home, and I looked across the street and could see where I needed to be and thought, I could be home in 20 minutes if I was just swimming & # 39; he told the ABC.

Dunne spent a lot of time in the water, fought in marathons and worked as a swimming teacher at Andrew Boy Charlton Pool.

The swimmer has confidence in his abilities and is currently negotiating safety issues – trying to convince his wife that it is safe.

Mr. Dunne first told his wife, Kate, about his ambitious idea when they first met in 2013, but she still has to approve.

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& # 39; He said to me: & # 39; I want to be able to swim to work by swimming & # 39 ;, and my first thought was that you were going to be feed for the Manly Ferry … you'll be chewed, & # 39; she said.

A spokesperson for Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) said it is not illegal to swim across the harbor, but it is also not advisable.

NSW Maritime Executive Director, Mark Hutchings, told Daily Mail Australia that swimming in the harbor is not illegal, but is not recommended by RMS.

& # 39; The activity puts the swimmer at risk of being hit by a ship and can affect those who sail on the harbor & # 39 ;, said Mr. Hutchings.

& # 39; If a swimmer interferes with shipping and ferry services, they commit a violation. & # 39;

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& # 39; Roads and Maritime and NSW Police have the authority to issue a safety directive for everyone swimming in the port if they believe that there is a reasonable risk to the safety of the swimmer. This means that the person must be sent back to the coast. & # 39;

The long-distance swimmer prefers to jump into the water with his glasses and waterproof backpack and makes the 1.5 km trip across the harbor (Mr Dunne introduced himself with his wife Kate)

The long-distance swimmer prefers to jump into the water with his glasses and waterproof backpack and makes the 1.5 km trip across the harbor (Mr Dunne introduced himself with his wife Kate)

The long-distance swimmer prefers to jump into the water with his glasses and waterproof backpack and makes the 1.5 km trip across the harbor (Mr Dunne introduced himself with his wife Kate)

Mr. Dunne plans to enter the port of Cremorne Point and swim 1.5 km wide to Macquarie's & Char on the edge of the Royal Botanic Gardens.

It is a violation to enter the botanical gardens via the seawall, but according to mr. Dunne's plan is completely safe.

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The 48-year-old father spent his childhood swimming from Cremorne Point to Kirribilli and playing in the harbor with friends.

He said he could plan his trip around passing ships and swim with a fluorescent float to be seen.

Mr. Dunne said that although he thinks the trip is risk-free, he hesitates to cause destruction in Sydney's busiest waterway.

& # 39; I would never want to disturb those operational ships or ferries … their work is hard enough without an idiot in the water, & # 39; he said.

Mr. Dunne (right) is confident that he can cross the famous harbor and is currently negotiating security issues - and is trying to convince his wife (left) that it is safe

Mr. Dunne (right) is confident that he can cross the famous harbor and is currently negotiating security issues - and is trying to convince his wife (left) that it is safe

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Mr. Dunne (right) is confident that he can cross the famous harbor and is currently negotiating security issues – and is trying to convince his wife (left) that it is safe

Mr Dunne wants to avoid traffic during commuting (photo: traffic in Sydney)

Mr Dunne wants to avoid traffic during commuting (photo: traffic in Sydney)

Mr Dunne wants to avoid traffic during commuting (photo: traffic in Sydney)

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