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Russell Harrison & # 39; s (pictured with wife Karen) heroic actions almost cost him his family after enduring a two-year legal battle after the house invader died
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A father of three who faced a possible prison sentence after intervening when a burglar attacked his female neighbor shares the hell he endured as he fought to clear his name.

The Melbourne man Russell Harrison was called a hero after he took action to save his neighbor, who was swallowed by drug user and former prisoner Adam Slomczewski.

His bravery almost cost him his life – and his family – when he was confronted with a two-year legal trial of the death of Slomczewski.

Russell Harrison & # 39; s (pictured with wife Karen) heroic actions almost cost him his family after enduring a two-year legal battle after the house invader died

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Russell Harrison & # 39; s (pictured with wife Karen) heroic actions almost cost him his family after enduring a two-year legal battle after the house invader died

Harrison and his wife Karen came too close to divorce during the two-year legal trial.

His security activities began to struggle as a result of the case and Mr. Harrison had to go to CentreLink.

& # 39; I almost lost my entire family & he said Sunday night.

Despite the tumultuous two years, Mr. Harrison said he had no regrets and said he would not hesitate to act if the same situation occurred again.

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& # 39; I wouldn't have a second doubt, if I encountered the same situation today, I would do it again if I had to, & # 39; he said.

Harrison, a former US military petty officer, ran away on December 11, 2015 when he & # 39; blood-curdling & # 39; heard shouts from his neighbors.

& # 39; They were not: & # 39; & # 39; Ah, I am injured. & # 39; & # 39; They were blood-curdling cries. It was a real shout that someone was in trouble, & Harrison said.

When he entered the house, he noticed that the young mother was being smothered by a home invader.

& # 39; It took her a minute to realize that it was me. As soon as she did, she screamed, & # 39; & # 39; Russell, help! & # 39; & # 39; So I flung open the door, I said: & # 39; & # 39; What are you doing? & # 39; & # 39; He let go and ran away through the house. & # 39;

The Melbourne man Russell Harrison (photo) was praised as a hero after taking action to rescue his neighbor who was swallowed by drug user and former prisoner Adam Slomczewski
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The Melbourne man Russell Harrison (photo) was praised as a hero after taking action to rescue his neighbor who was swallowed by drug user and former prisoner Adam Slomczewski

The Melbourne man Russell Harrison (photo) was praised as a hero after taking action to rescue his neighbor who was swallowed by drug user and former prisoner Adam Slomczewski

Ice user Adam Slomczewski (photo) died during a fight after breaking into a woman's house in Melbourne

Ice user Adam Slomczewski (photo) died during a fight after breaking into a woman's house in Melbourne

Ice user Adam Slomczewski (photo) died during a fight after breaking into a woman's house in Melbourne

Messrs Harrison and Slomczewski struggled before Mr. Harrison was able to bring Slomczewski into clash.

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then seemed to faint before the police arrived.

However, when the police arrived, they noticed that the 44-year-old did not respond.

& # 39; When the police came in, the first thing they did was check him & # 39 ;, Harrison said.

& # 39; The police said: & # 39; The guy isn't breathing. & # 39; & # 39; I turned it around and I started CPR. I continued CPR until the police put on their gloves. Then they took me and took it over until the paramedics arrived there. & # 39;

Slomczewski could not be brought to life.

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Harrison told the police that he was not going to harm Slomczewski, but wanted to stop him from fleeing, Adelaide now reported.

He was acquitted in November 2017 after the burglar's death.

The coroner found Mr. Slomczewski died of & # 39; cardiac arrhythmias in the context of fight, neck compression and amphetamine use & # 39 ;.

Ben Rhodes claimed that he served a life sentence after his leg was blown off during a burglary in a remote building in Teralba, New South Wales, in 2016

Ben Rhodes claimed that he served a life sentence after his leg was blown off during a burglary in a remote building in Teralba, New South Wales, in 2016

Ben Rhodes claimed that he served a life sentence after his leg was blown off during a burglary in a remote building in Teralba, New South Wales, in 2016

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Mr. Harrison, from the US, believes that homeowners should have the right to defend themselves when someone breaks into.

& # 39; You must be able to defend yourself, defend someone else, and defend your property without fear of being prosecuted, & # 39; he said.

However, not everyone agrees.

Ben Rhodes claimed that he served a life sentence after his leg was blown off during a burglary in a remote building in Teralba, New South Wales, in 2016.

He and a friend had used the estate as a target for shotguns. However, he was caught by the owner.

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The homeowner claimed that the firearm was accidentally discharged during a fight. But Rhodes claimed it had been intentional.

& # 39; You can't just shoot someone down because he is on your property. Not in Australia. & # 39;

Rhodes escaped from prison when a judge discovered that he had a & # 39; substantial extra curious punishment & # 39; and had sustained lifelong injuries, The Newcastle Herald reported.

What are the rules when it comes to defending yourself against an intruder in the house?

In New South Wales, a person can defend himself in his home, according to the 2001 NSW Crimes Act.

A change in the early 2000s, however, means that a homeowner can only use the forbidden defense if they have injured the intruder and have not killed the intruder.

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In Queensland, a person can & # 39; reasonable coercion & # 39; to defend themselves, someone else or their property. However, they cannot cause serious physical injury.

South Australia and Western Australia have a specific law that deals with self-defense with regard to home invasion.

In Western Australia, a person is permitted to use force that he & # 39; reasonably needs & # 39; to defend his property – as long as the person does not cause serious harm to that person.

In South Australia, the law requires residents who defend themselves or another, or protect property from an intruder, to reasonably believe that this is necessary.

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