Meet the dam of three Mississippi AG who could rock Roe v. Wade

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch has become the face of the reproductive rights lawsuit that could take down Roe v. Wade.

The 60-year-old mother of three believes the “march of progress” has left Roe behind because women can now enjoy “both professional success and rich family life,” argued she in an opening letter to the Supreme Court in July. submitted. .

Fitch, according to a profile from The Lily, took inspiration from her own life to come up with that legal reasoning, as she raised her three children as a single mother after divorcing in 2004 — and was elected Mississippi’s first female attorney general in 2019.

“You have the opportunity in life to really achieve your dreams and goals,” Fitch said in a TV interview about the case. “And you can have those beautiful children too.”

But as critics point out, Fitch — a white Republican and staunch supporter of former President Donald Trump — came from a more privileged background than some women who might have wanted an abortion.

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch (second from right) has become the face of the reproductive rights lawsuit that could take down Roe v. Wade.  She waves to supporters as she leaves the Supreme Court on Wednesday

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch (second from right) has become the face of the reproductive rights lawsuit that could take down Roe v. Wade. She waves to supporters as she leaves the Supreme Court on Wednesday

The 60-year-old mother of three was elected in 2019 and sworn in on January 14, 2020.  Mississippi Republican government Phil Bryant signed the restrictive 15-week abortion bill before Lynn Fitch's tenure in March 2018, but she defended herself at her leisure.  the

The 60-year-old mother of three was elected in 2019 and sworn in on January 14, 2020.  Mississippi Republican government Phil Bryant signed the restrictive 15-week abortion bill before Lynn Fitch's tenure in March 2018, but she defended herself at her leisure.  the

The 60-year-old mother of three was elected in 2019 and sworn in on January 14, 2020. Mississippi Republican government Phil Bryant signed the restrictive 15-week abortion bill before Lynn Fitch’s tenure in March 2018, but she defended herself at her leisure. the

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch poses with family members during her swearing-in ceremony on Jan. 14, 2020. Fitch drew inspiration from her own life to come up with the legal reasoning that could rock Roe v. Wade

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch poses with family members during her swearing-in ceremony on Jan. 14, 2020. Fitch drew inspiration from her own life to come up with the legal reasoning that could rock Roe v. Wade

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch poses with family members during her swearing-in ceremony on Jan. 14, 2020. Fitch drew inspiration from her own life to come up with the legal reasoning that could rock Roe v. Wade

Her family was seen as a success story in her hometown of Holly Springs, Mississippi.

Her late father, Bill, who died in September, owned a series of consumer finance companies.

He also inherited his family farm called the Galena Plantation and turned it into a quail hunting destination.

Part of that effort involved buying the cottage from Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general and the first Great Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan, and moving into the property.

The cabin was where Forrest lived while in Hernando, Mississippi.

It’s now gone fully restored and can accommodate eight to ten guests.

Among those who previously spent time hunting Galena Plantation: the late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia.

Lynn Fitch's father inherited the family farm, called Galena Plantation, and bought a cabin that was home to Confederate General and first Great Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan Nathan Bedford Forrest and moved it to the estate, which is a quail hunting destination.

Lynn Fitch's father inherited the family farm, called Galena Plantation, and bought a cabin that was home to Confederate General and first Great Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan Nathan Bedford Forrest and moved it to the estate, which is a quail hunting destination.

Lynn Fitch’s father inherited the family farm, called Galena Plantation, and bought a cabin that was home to Confederate General and first Great Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan Nathan Bedford Forrest and moved it to the estate, which is a quail hunting destination.

An interior shot of the cabin that belonged to Confederate General and Ku Klux Klan's first Great Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest, who had relocated the late father of the Mississippi Attorney General to the family ranch and renovated it

An interior shot of the cabin that belonged to Confederate General and Ku Klux Klan's first Great Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest, who had relocated the late father of the Mississippi Attorney General to the family ranch and renovated it

An interior shot of the cabin that belonged to Confederate General and Ku Klux Klan’s first Great Wizard Nathan Bedford Forrest, who had relocated the late father of the Mississippi Attorney General to the family ranch and renovated it

The Lily spoke to Hayes Dent, Fitch’s first campaign manager, who led her successful run for state treasurer in 2011.

Dent told the publication that Fitch’s path to political success was very traditional for Mississippi — she went to school at the University of Mississippi and was a member of a sorority — and used that network as her political base.

He said Fitch’s father was her biggest donor to her first campaign.

And while she was a single mom, she had a group of six other moms who would help with the drop-off and pick-up, according to The Lily. And she paid for childcare and a nanny.

Mississippi Republican government Phil Bryant signed into law the restrictive 15-week abortion law in March 2018 — which contains no exceptions for rape or incest, but does allow “exceptions for medical emergencies or serious fetal abnormalities.”

Fitch didn’t come into office until January 2020, but defended it with ease.

She chose the slogan “Empower Women, Promote Life” as the motto for the case and used it in tweets in support of the Supreme Court getting the law up and running this week.

“Today we begin a new chapter in American history, moving away from the false assumption that abortion is leveling the playing field for women,” she tweeted Wednesday, the day the pleadings took place before the Court. “We can empower women AND improve life. This is our message to the judges and the world watching.’

Protesters faced the Supreme Court on Wednesday as the nine judges heard a case over whether or not to enforce Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban, which does not include carve-outs for rape or incest cases

Protesters faced the Supreme Court on Wednesday as the nine judges heard a case over whether or not to enforce Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban, which does not include carve-outs for rape or incest cases

Protesters faced the Supreme Court on Wednesday as the nine judges heard a case over whether or not to enforce Mississippi’s 15-week abortion ban, which does not include carve-outs for rape or incest cases

Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch (center) has used the slogan “Empower Women, Promote Life” as the motto for the abortion law, while insisting that women can now have “both professional success and rich family life,” and so abortion should be banned

While Roe v. Wade argued that an unwanted pregnancy could condemn women to “an frightening life and a future,” Fitch also argued in the letter to the Supreme Court that “adoption is more accessible today” and “contraceptives are more available and more effective,” as well as insisting that women can have both a career and a family life – something that 154 economists do not agree with.

‘Innumerable women and mothers have reached the highest echelons of economic and social life, regardless of the law subscribed to in those cases. Significant policy advances are now advancing women’s full aspirations for both careers and families,” the letter said.

Jennifer Riley Collins, Fitch’s 2019 Democratic political opponent, told The Lily that Fitch’s argument was “absurd.”

‘Do you want to empower women?’ Collins told the publication. ‘Set up systems that support women. You don’t deprive women of their freedom.’

Collins pointed out how Fitch would continue the campaign trail that “kids should know how to count money.”

“It’s hard to count money you don’t have,” the Democrat noted, adding that without essential resources, empowerment can only get you this far.

During Wednesday’s pleadings, the Supreme Court seemed poised to either reverse or reverse the landmark 1973 Roe decision, which made abortion legal across the country to the point of fetal viability.

A second Supreme Court ruling, Casey v. Planned Parenthood, said states should not place an “undue burden” on women seeking abortions. In general, viability is believed to be around 24 weeks or later.

But Chief Justice John Roberts, a Bush 43 appointee turned swing voter, said Mississippi’s 15-week suspension “was not a dramatic deviation from viability.”

“If you think… that women should have the choice to terminate their pregnancy, suppose that there is a time when they’ve had the fair choice, the opportunity to choose, and why would 15 weeks be an inappropriate rule.” ? Because I don’t think viability has anything to do with choice. But if it’s really a choice, why isn’t 15 weeks enough time?’ Roberts mused.

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