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At the age of only 17, student 12 Bloom, Jack Bloomfield (photo) raised more than $ 1 million after launching five e-commerce stores - without the help of his parents

These are young Australian entrepreneurs who run successful businesses while juggling schoolwork.

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They started collecting money before they were teenagers, started their business without the help of their parents – and hired them as staff.

In a conversation with Sunday Night, Jack Bloomfield, Ali Kitinas and Morgan Hipworth revealed how they became the boss of their own company and home-made millionaires.

At the age of just 17, student 12 Bloom, Jack Bloomfield, has raised more than $ 1 million after launching five e-commerce stores – without the help of his parents.

The schoolboy from Brisbane buys popular items in bulk, from bow ties in China to iPhone cases from South Korea, before selling them in his online stores.

& # 39; I am not a school captain, not a prefect, not a special person … just a normal child with a dream that started and made it work & he said.

He was a teenage barley when he started his first online business, & # 39; Next Gifts & # 39 ;, by selling gift cards.

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And at the age of 13 he designed a website called & # 39; Blue Health & # 39; where medical information about users can be stored in one location.

Jack remembered his dreams of making a lot of money because he was only seven years old and started mowing his neighbors' lawn for $ 20.

He had also sold lolly bags at his mother and father's tennis shop as a child and knew that being an entrepreneur was always in his blood.

& # 39; The idea of ​​going to college, starting with a low-paid job, working your 20 years until you are finally 40 and 50 and living the good life and thinking, "I don't want to wait that long" & # 39 ;, & # 39; he said.

Jack's parents often have to tell others that the success of their son's business was due to his own efforts.

& # 39; Very often people think: & # 39; & # 39; Oh, you must be part of that company, you must manage it & # 39; & # 39 ;, we don't, & # 39; his mother said.

& # 39; I never thought I'd be two years ago where I am now & he said.

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& # 39; I am living proof that you cannot start with anything. & # 39;

At the age of only 17, student 12 Bloom, Jack Bloomfield (photo) raised more than $ 1 million after launching five e-commerce stores - without the help of his parents

At the age of only 17, student 12 Bloom, Jack Bloomfield (photo) raised more than $ 1 million after launching five e-commerce stores – without the help of his parents

Ali Kitinas, who has just turned 18, is in her last year of high school and is believed to be Australia's youngest female CEO.

When she was only 15 years old, she founded a skin care boutique, Freedom Scrub, which sold body scrubs made from recycled coffee grinders.

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The employee of the HSC student is also her mother, Lynne, who says she is waiting for her daughter to give her a raise.

& # 39; I think I always grew up that whatever I wanted to do, I could do it, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; Mom and Dad would always be there for me and help me figure it out.

& # 39; Your age does not matter and there should never be a barrier. & # 39;

Ali Kitinas (photo), who has just turned 18, is in her last year of high school and is believed to be Australia's youngest female CEO
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Ali Kitinas (photo), who has just turned 18, is in her last year of high school and is believed to be Australia's youngest female CEO

Ali Kitinas (photo), who has just turned 18, is in her last year of high school and is believed to be Australia's youngest female CEO

But she admits that juggling her thriving business with the HSC has not always been easy.

& # 39; The HSC is a very stressful time, but I use it as an opportunity to see what I can do after school, & # 39; she said.

Part of the profit from her business goes to helping poverty in war-affected countries in Rwanda and Kolkata.

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Morgan Hipworth is an 18-year-old chef and started his first business when he was just in Year Nine.

He became an ambitious restaurant owner when he was only seven, after watching the popular MasterChef cooking show.

And when Morgan is not in school, he runs Bistro Morgan – a trendy donut shop in Windsor, Melbourne, where he has half a million dollars in his pocket in a year.

Morgan Hipworth (pictured left with mother Ellie) is an 18-year-old chef and started running his first business when he was just in Year Nine

Morgan Hipworth (pictured left with mother Ellie) is an 18-year-old chef and started running his first business when he was just in Year Nine

Morgan Hipworth (pictured left with mother Ellie) is an 18-year-old chef and started running his first business when he was just in Year Nine

& # 39; I can choose my own hours, 100 percent my dream and look forward to what will happen & # 39 ;, he said.

& # 39; I can't say school taught me how to make donuts. & # 39;

Morgan & # 39; s path to success began when he made three course meals every weekend for two to three years for his friends and family to judge.

At the age of 11 he started making cakes for friends and family every weekend.

A trip to the local cafe brought him a job as a cake supplier at the age of 13 and spent his nights and weekends baking.

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Morgan eventually approached a broker when he was in year nine to start a bakery, which cost him $ 6,000.

The bakery, which sold some good ones, saw 10,000 donuts sold in 10 days.

He then opened Bistro Morgan, where the young teenager noticed that he closed the store at 2 am and reopened at 4 am.

His store has currently employed 20 people, including Ellie, his mother.

He then opened Bistro Morgan, where the company sold $ 10,000 in 10 days

He then opened Bistro Morgan, where the company sold $ 10,000 in 10 days

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He then opened Bistro Morgan, where the company sold $ 10,000 in 10 days

One of the most famous entrepreneurs in the world, Gary Vaynerchuk, said the school system is & # 39; outdated & # 39; and does not always equip students for future success.

& # 39; Any company doesn't need a diploma to get hired & he said.

& # 39; The largest companies in the world – Amazon, Google – no longer need degrees, so what do you fall back on? & # 39;

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