Ultimate magazine theme for WordPress.

Meateater taste tests for vegetarian burgers from McDonalds, Grill’d, Soul Burger and Hungry Jacks

McDonald’s has finally joined some of its largest Australian burger chains when it launched its first vegetarian burger with a lot of fanfare.

The fast food giant keeps an eye on how its customers react to the vegetarian-friendly patty option, which is similar to McChicken burger.

The decision comes because people are increasingly resorting to vegetarianism and veganism for personal or ecological reasons.

New data suggests that more than 2.1 million people in Australia eat almost entirely plant-based options.

Daily Mail Australia reporter Brittany Chain is not one of those people. In fact, she could not imagine life without eating meat.

We put the McVeggie citizen to the test to compare it with other vegetable options on the market.

Suffice it to say that the results were very surprising.

Reporter Daily Mail Australia Brittany Chain currently tasted four vegetable hamburgers on the market (shown with the McVeggie)

Reporter Daily Mail Australia Brittany Chain currently tasted four vegetable hamburgers on the market (shown with the McVeggie)

McDonald’s – McVeggie burger, 481 calories – 6 out of 10

At first glance, a McDonald’s lover should realize that they hadn’t received a standard McChicken burger.

With the same sandwich and a similar-looking patty on a blanket of green lettuce, I certainly would not have known the difference.

Before I even read the ingredient list, I was able to choose what the pie was made with.

Although the coating was crispy and reminiscent of chicken patties, the texture itself had more in common with falafel.

When I read the ingredients, I realized that it combines potatoes, peas, corn, carrot and onion and is accompanied by cheese, lettuce, mayonnaise and pickles.

Shown: Promotional photo for the new McVeggie burger available at McDonalds

Shown: Promotional photo for the new McVeggie burger available at McDonalds

Shown: Promotional photo for the new McVeggie burger available at McDonalds

For someone who would usually never opt for a hamburger option during a McDonald’s run late at night, I was pleasantly surprised with the McVeggie burger.

In an office full of vegetarians and vegans, the McVeggie citizen received the sign of approval, despite being “ridiculously late to participate in the Aussie game.”

A statement from McDonald’s stated that while there are no meat ingredients in the burger, “because of the cooking procedure it is not strictly vegetarian.”

Price: $ 5.70

Satay Tofu Burger – Soul Burger, 414 Calories – 8 out of 10

I think the weather is important to remember that I would not normally choose a hamburger as my first choice at lunch, but if I were in a hamburger mood, I would choose this one.

The saté marinated tofu was soft and paired with apple slaw, aoili sauce and tomato sauce on a wheat bread.

Each burger contains around 414 calories, which come in just under the McVeggie option.

Another impressive thing with the Satay Tofu burger is that Soul Burger does not pretend that it is something it is not.

Shown: Daily Mail Australia reporter Brittany Chain about to taste one of the hamburger options

Shown: Daily Mail Australia reporter Brittany Chain about to taste one of the hamburger options

Shown: Daily Mail Australia reporter Brittany Chain about to taste one of the hamburger options

They do not use ‘vegetable meat’ and they do not advertise that it will taste ‘real’ because it is real.

A small criticism is that the tofu itself was cut into a very thick cube and somewhat overpowered the rest of the ingredients and the sandwich itself.

All in all I think it is safe to say that this burger was the best of the bunch and much better than many burgers I have had in my time.

Price: $ 10.50

The saté marinated tofu was soft and paired with apple slaw, aoili sauce and tomato sauce on a wheat bread.

The saté marinated tofu was soft and paired with apple slaw, aoili sauce and tomato sauce on a wheat bread.

The saté marinated tofu was soft and paired with apple slaw, aoili sauce and tomato sauce on a wheat bread.

Garden Goodness – Grill’d, 654 Calories – 4 out of 10

This just didn’t do it for me.

From what I’ve heard, Grill’d has a large number of options for vegans and vegetarians, but the Garden Goodness burger left a lot to be desired.

The green vegetarian patty looked like he didn’t spend enough time in the food processor and there was excessive salad spilling from the sides. I almost didn’t know where to start.

Texture is without a doubt the most important thing for me when it comes to food – if it looks like porridge and feels like porridge, I don’t have it.

Shown: the promotional inclusion of the Garden Goodness citizen and the Daily Mail Australia at version

The hamburger itself was pretty messy and a little hard to eat, purely based on its mammoth size and the pie itself seemed to let all the moisture flow out of my mouth.

On the positive side, the pie offers vegetarians the opportunity to eat something based on vegetables instead of a meat substitute that mimics the real thing.

The burger contains 654 calories and is packed with beetroot, tasty cheese, avocado, salad, sauce and spiced mayo on a huge sandwich.

Price: $ 13

The hamburger itself was rather sloppy and a bit difficult to eat purely based on its mammoth size

The hamburger itself was rather sloppy and a bit difficult to eat purely based on its mammoth size

The hamburger itself was rather sloppy and a bit difficult to eat purely based on its mammoth size

Rebel Whopper – Hungry Jacks – 5 out of 10

I’ve heard good things about the Rebel Whopper burger since Hungry Jacks first released it.

Advertised as “100 percent Whopper, 0 percent beef,” I was a little skeptical about a hamburger that was so determined to drop it as something that it isn’t.

But I decided to take the taste test with an open mind.

It was the most calorie-rich option on the plate with 666 calories, but was a decent size full of the perfect amount of lettuce, tomato, onion, pickles, mayonnaise, and ketchup.

Shown: the promotional photo and the actual Rebel Whopper that Daily Mail Australia has sampled

It was also the first of the series to imitate beef, and it actually smelled so – an imitation.

I found the fleshy odor rather unpleasant and the feeling continued when I took my first bite.

Citizens would have benefited more from being completely vegetarian, instead of replacing meat with a vegetable option to grill it only on the same platforms on which the meat was grilled.

In general, I see the attraction for people trying to slowly eliminate or remove meat from their diet.

Price: $ 8.15

.