Home Politics Mayor says NYE fireworks show in Sydney Harbour was about ‘Blak power’

Mayor says NYE fireworks show in Sydney Harbour was about ‘Blak power’

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Ms Moore was a leading supporter of Indigenous Voice in Parliament and gave a telling hint that the night would be very political earlier in the evening.

Sydney Mayor Clover Moore has defended the New Year’s Eve fireworks show despite Australians criticizing the entertainment for its political overtones.

Ms Moore was a leading supporter of Indigenous Voice in Parliament and gave a telling hint that it would be a very political night on Sunday night.

In a New Year’s Eve speech, Ms Moore expressed her disappointment at the failure of the referendum while gloating about the fact that “70 per cent” of her electorate had voted Yes and calling for “real support for our First Nations people “.

His Sydney Town Hall came under fire hours later for the family-friendly 9pm fireworks show for its overtly political performance by indigenous rap group 3%.

The ‘Calling Country’ fireworks had references to the failed Voice to Parliament referendum, the colonization of Australia and the Stolen Generation.

Several outraged Australians took to social media to express their frustration, prompting Moore to intervene and defend the program.

Ms Moore was a leading supporter of Indigenous Voice in Parliament and gave a telling hint that the night would be very political earlier in the evening.

She argued in a social media post that the show was designed to “recognize Blak Power.”

“(The) 9pm Calling Country fireworks were intended to celebrate our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities,” he wrote.

‘It has been a difficult year for our indigenous communities as they have struggled to overcome the shameful referendum result.

“Tonight was about recognizing Blak’s power and resilience through music, art and fireworks.”

The City of Sydney had one of the largest votes in favor in the country, along with Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s Grayndler electorate and the Australian Capital Territory.

Ahead of the show, Ms Moore said the 9pm fireworks – usually known as family fireworks, as children are less likely to be awake for the midnight show – would “honour Australia’s indigenous heritage and Sydney.”

He said the show was titled ‘Calling Country’ and was done in collaboration with indigenous artists.

The show, Ms Moore said, would act as a reminder to the world that “Sydney is a global city… it is inclusive and diverse for all communities”.

Elsewhere in that New Year’s Eve speech, Ms. Moore revealed her hope that “2024 will be a much better year than 2023, with an end to the devastation of communities in Gaza, Israel and Ukraine.”

The fireworks broadcast also featured Melbourne singer Angie McMahon, who not only took to the stage to sing Sinead O’Connor’s Nothing Compares to You, but to make a statement about the Israel-Hamas conflict.

McMahon took the opportunity to weigh in on the Israel-Palestine conflict during his performance, telling the crowd, “Palestinians should be free.”

Ms Moore also called for an end to approval of coal mines and gas projects.

The taxpayer-funded national broadcaster has been widely criticized for its coverage of Sydney's 9pm New Year's Eve fireworks show, which was watched by millions of Australians, many of them under 12.

The taxpayer-funded national broadcaster has been widely criticized for its coverage of Sydney’s 9pm New Year’s Eve fireworks show, which was watched by millions of Australians, many of them under 12.

In a wide-ranging New Year's Eve speech, Mrs Moore (pictured wearing a Yes T-shirt and holding an umbrella) called for

In a wide-ranging New Year’s Eve speech, Ms Moore (pictured wearing a Yes T-shirt and holding an umbrella) called for “real support for our First Nations people following this year’s Vote No vote in Federal Parliament.” , noting that he was “very proud that 70 percent of the people of our city voted Yes.

The No vote was devastating for its staunch defenders.  Pictured: Yes supporters reacting after it became clear on October 14 that the vote would fail.

The No vote was devastating for its staunch defenders. Pictured: Yes supporters reacting after it became clear on October 14 that the vote would fail.

He was later asked why there was any need for a ‘Calling Country’ show in the schedule that normally prioritizes children’s entertainment.

Moore argued that the name of the program has not changed in three years and is an indication that Sydney is “proud to celebrate the world’s oldest culture.”

The taxpayer-funded national broadcaster has been widely criticized for its coverage of Sydney’s 9pm New Year’s Eve fireworks show, which was watched by millions of Australians, many of them under 12.

While the exhibition featured a screening of the popular children’s show Bluey on the pillars of the Sydney Harbor Bridge before the 9pm fireworks, it also featured an overtly political performance by indigenous rap group 3%.

The group’s song ‘Our People’ includes lyrics such as ‘They stole the land in the name of their kings’, ‘They locked us up and then they threw away the key’ and ‘You can suck my Moby D***’.

However, several changes were made to the song to fit the family show and the last lyrics changed to “You’re going to sink this ship Moby.”

Up-and-coming Melbourne singer Angie McMahon also received criticism for her participation in the widely criticized show.  She took to the stage wearing a t-shirt that said 'no children in prison' in reference to a campaign to raise the age of criminal responsibility in Australia, which is currently 10 years old.

Up-and-coming Melbourne singer Angie McMahon also received criticism for her participation in the widely criticized show. She took to the stage wearing a t-shirt that said ‘no children in prison’ in reference to a campaign to raise the age of criminal responsibility in Australia, which is currently 10 years old.

The display showed a projection of the popular children's show Bluey on the pillars of the Sydney Harbor Bridge before the 9pm fireworks.

The display showed a projection of the popular children’s show Bluey on the pillars of the Sydney Harbor Bridge before the 9pm fireworks.

References to the failed Voice to Parliament referendum, the colonization of Australia and the Stolen Generation led critics to question why the ABC chooses to politicize New Year’s Eve every year.

And up-and-coming Melbourne singer Angie McMahon also received criticism for her participation in the widely criticized show.

He took to the stage wearing a t-shirt that said ‘no children in prison’ in reference to a campaign to raise the age of criminal responsibility in Australia, which is currently 10 years old.

Then he waded into the conflict between Israel and Hamas, telling the crowd, “Palestinians should be free.”

Viewers criticized the singer as a “wannabe activist” and asked why taxpayer-funded performances had to be accompanied by a “painful political statement.”

And their social media pages have been inundated with mixed reviews from fans and viewers.

Some say they have found her music behind the political statement and are new fans, while others accuse her of “selective morality.”

It also featured an overtly political performance by indigenous rap group 3%.

It also featured an overtly political performance by indigenous rap group 3%.

Daily Mail Australia approached Ms McMahon and Ms Moore’s office regarding the public reception of the programme.

Prominent anti-Voice activist Warren Mundine told Daily Mail Australia it was “shameful” that New Year’s Eve entertainment was being politicised.

“We just want to start the year off and have fun, because this year is going to be a great year,” Mundine said.

‘New Year’s Eve is an incredible historic occasion for Sydney and indeed the world. It is broadcast on television all over the world and I think people are getting tired of the politicization of things.

‘We are sick and tired of the politicization of everything. We Australians are pretty calm.

An ABC spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia that family viewing was an important part of the broadcast.

He said before the fireworks there was an exclusive viewing of Muster Dogs Series 2, as well as a special surprise from Bluey and Calling Country, a celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait communities, produced by Indigenous social enterprise We Are Warriors .

“ABC’s New York concert also showcased the biggest names in Australian music, including Jessica Mauboy, Genesis Owusu, King Stingray, Confidence Man, Angie McMahon, Mark Seymour, Grentperez and the Queen of New Year’s Eve, Casey Donovan,” the spokesperson said.

“The ABC is proud to support all aspects of Australian culture and entertainment on New Year’s Eve and every other night of the year.”

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