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Mayor Adams turns on NYC’s 2,000 speed cameras 24 hours a day

New York City Mayor Eric Adams has declared war on motorists by expanding the city’s speed camera program to operate 24/7 – while also generating millions in revenue for the city – as the Big Apple continues to rot and violent crime rises. .

The city’s 2,000 speed cameras in 750 school zones were already in use on weekdays from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m., but the New York state legislature passed a law in June that allows the city to expand around the clock.

Adams held a press conference earlier this week to “turn the switch” on the 24/7 camera enforcement program, which issues $50 tickets to cars that are caught going at least 11 mph above the city’s 25 mph speed limit for residential streets. In other words, drivers who drive at a speed of 36 km/h or more will be fined.

“Road safety is public safety, and today marks the beginning of a new chapter for road safety in our city,” Adams said. “A city that never sleeps deserves a camera system that doesn’t nap.”

This year, there have been 142 traffic fatalities in the city this year, up 20 percent from the pre-pandemic baseline in 2019.

Two pedestrians have been killed since the camera switches were ‘flipped’. On Wednesday, a BMW sedan hit another car in the Inwood neighborhood of Manhattan. The second car then hit two parked cars and two men, aged 31 and 32, were killed. It is not clear which of the vehicles hit them.

Still, some critics argue that automated speeding enforcement is a government oversight or a cynical method of monetizing — with the city issuing more than 1.2 million violations in the first four months of 2022, equating to $61.3 million worth of money. Fines.

Meanwhile, the war on speeding comes as the NYPD revealed this week that homicides and violent crime in the city rose 40% in the first six months of this year, compared to the same period in 2021.

On Monday, Adams held a press conference to

On Monday, Adams held a press conference to “flick the switch” on the 24/7 camera enforcement program, which issues $50 tickets to cars that are at least 11 mph over the limit.

The city's 2,000 speed cameras in 750 school zones were already in use from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, but the New York state legislature passed a law in June to expand the program.

The city’s 2,000 speed cameras in 750 school zones were already in use from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. weekdays, but the New York state legislature passed a law in June to expand the program.

New York first introduced speed camera enforcement in 2014, and city officials say that speeding at camera locations has dropped an average of 72 percent since the program began.

According to data from the city’s Department of Transportation, the number of people injured in the corridors with cameras in the speed zones of schools has fallen by 14 percent overall.

However, New York has been struggling of late with a rising number of road deaths, which increased during the pandemic as empty streets encouraged reckless speeding.

In 2020, 54 percent of traffic-related deaths in camera zones occurred when cameras had to be turned off at night and on weekends, city says

In 2020, New York City issued a total of 4,397,375 speed camera liability notices, raising more than $219 million in potential fines, according to one city. report on the program.

The tickets generated by speed cameras are sent to the registered owner of the vehicle and do not identify the driver. Unlike citations issued by traffic cops, they don’t come with penalty points on a driver’s license.

The tickets are limited to $50, with no additional penalties for repeat offenders. A state law that would have increased fines for repeat offenders fell through this summer.

However, registered vehicle owners who have received 15 or more camera tickets within a year may be required to take a safe driving class.

The city does not disclose the location of the speed cameras on any list or map, but each camera is preceded by a photo enforcement warning sign.

The automated speed enforcement program was first rolled out under former Mayor Bill de Blasio in 2014.

The cameras initially operated from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. before expanding to 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. in 2019.

The number of cameras has continued to grow steadily, with the DOT installing about 60 new cameras per month last year.

In 2020, New York City issued a total of 4,397,375 speed camera liability notices, raising more than $219 million in fines (file photo)

In 2020, New York City issued a total of 4,397,375 speed camera liability notices, raising more than $219 million in fines (file photo)

City says 54% of road deaths occurred in school speed zones when cameras had to be turned off earlier

City says 54% of road deaths occurred in school speed zones when cameras had to be turned off earlier

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Because the system was running 24/7 this week, Adams said he was in favor of further expanding the number of speed cameras in the city.

“I’m not satisfied until we have zero deaths and accidents. So we continue to push to go beyond school zones,” he said.

“Technology works, and I don’t know why we’re afraid of technology… There’s a real loophole in the tickets, you know: don’t speed,” the mayor added.

The expansion of speed camera enforcement in New York follows the promotion of speed cameras by the federal transportation department as part of the National Roadway Safety Strategy in January.

Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg faced some criticism after his department rolled out the plan, which will be supported by $5 billion in federal grants over the next five years.

Currently, eight US states have laws specifically banning speed cameras.  Only 18 states plus DC have speed cameras by law, while the other states have no law

Currently, eight US states have laws specifically banning speed cameras. Only 18 states plus DC have speed cameras by law, while the other states have no law

Buttigieg said new federal data released next week will show another increase in road deaths through the third quarter of 2021

Buttigieg said new federal data released next week will show another increase in road deaths through the third quarter of 2021

The number of road deaths rose sharply in 2020 as empty roads led to more speeding violations

The number of road deaths rose sharply in 2020 as empty roads led to more speeding violations

The New York City DOT did not immediately respond to a question about whether the speed camera program is supported by federal funding through the program.

Driver advocacy groups reacted with caution to the federal plan to promote more speed cameras across the country.

“Speed ​​cameras can help effectively reduce excessive speeds and mitigate legitimate concerns about fairness in traffic enforcement,” an American Automobile Association spokesperson told the DailyMail.com in January.

That said, to reap these benefits from this technology, governments that implement them must ensure that they do so deliberately and use data to guide decision-making as to where there is a legitimate security need for them,” the group added. ready.

Currently, eight US states have laws specifically banning speed cameras.

Only 18 states plus DC have speed cameras in use by law, while the other states have no law on the books permitting their use.

Buttigieg’s strategy recommends pilot programs to study and promote the use of speed cameras, which he says could provide more “equitable” enforcement than stopping police traffic because the cameras are oblivious to the race of the driver.

The reason for the plan is a sharp increase in the number of road deaths in recent years.

Buttigieg said federal data shows another increase in road deaths through the third quarter of 2021.

Those numbers indicate a significant increase in deaths compared to the same period in 2020, adding to a six-month road death total of 20,160, already the highest six-month figure since 2006.

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