May & # 39; s cabinet at war over No Deal: Andrea Leadsom says Britain must leave the EU on October 31

Theresa May was viewed from all sides tonight after she cast a vote on a second referendum in a desperate attempt to get her Brexit Bill through.

The Prime Minister emotionally argued for MPs to come aboard her & # 39; daring & # 39; package and said they & # 39; had one last chance & # 39; to get over the UK's departure from the EU before the opportunity slips & # 39 ;.

& # 39; I tried everything I could to get this through & # 39 ;, she said. & # 39; I offered to give up the job I love. & # 39;

In a speech in Westminster, Ms. May held the prospect of a temporary customs union with the EU until the next general election, as well as a vote on a referendum in an attempt to break the deadlock.

But MailOnline understands that she was forced to weaken her offer after a fierce uprising in the cabinet about the idea of ​​giving MPs a free vote on a referendum – something that would have made it much more likely.

Commons leader Andrea Leadsom and transport secretary Chris Grayling apparently threatened to stop during a loaded two-hour session on Downing Street this morning. No10 said that correct voting arrangements have yet to be decided.

The package that Mrs. May prepared in a speech this evening has only infuriated both parties, with Brexiteers calling it a & # 39; direct insult & # 39; and a & # 39; dog breakfast & # 39; while Labor and important remnants said it did not go far enough.

As the prime minister's problems got deeper, Jacob Rees-Mogg, the DUP, and more moderate Tories publicly declared that they would vote against the Bill – putting it on the right track for a crushing defeat.

Theresa May called on politicians this afternoon with her & # 39; daring & # 39; package on board in a speech in Westminster

In a passionate speech when dusk seemed to come to power in her time, Mrs. May:

  • Tried to reassure Brexiteers by saying that the government is still looking for & # 39; alternative arrangements & # 39; they could prevent the Irish border break from ever coming into effect.
  • Legal guarantees dedicated to Labor Labor MPs that workers' protection will be just as beneficial in the UK as it is in the EU.
  • Said parliamentarians will be able to decide between a temporary customs union with the EU and the customs proposals of the government.
  • Postponed a vote on a second referendum – but stopped saying that Tory MPs would get a free vote on the subject.

At the quickly arranged address, Ms. May warned that this was the last chance to & # 39; a future for nightmares of permanently polarized politics & # 39; to avoid.

She said: & # 39; If MPs vote against the second reading of this law, they vote to stop the Brexit.

& # 39; If they do, the consequences can hardly be greater – reject this deal and leave the EU in the water with a negotiated deal and what would we do then? & # 39;

Ms. May also gave the Brexiteers a clear message that their hardline demands risked keeping the UK in the EU.

& # 39; Some suggest leaving without an appointment, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; But whatever you think of that outcome – it is clear to Parliament that it will do everything to stop it.

& # 39; If not, it should be a general election or a second referendum that could lead to withdrawal – and no Brexit at all. & # 39;

The demand for labor for a second referendum caused an attempt to compromise between the parties on the Brexit last week.

In her attempt to win over the remaining Members, Mrs May said: "I recognize Parliament's sincere and genuine power in this important matter.

& # 39; The government will therefore include in the Revocation Agreement a requirement to vote on whether or not to hold a second referendum and this must take place before the withdrawal agreement can be ratified. & # 39;

But Mrs May's suggestion was dismissed by Labor members as & # 39; deception & # 39 ;. The last time a vote was held in a referendum, it was overwhelmingly defeated by 334 to 85 – and supporters don't believe the outcome would be different.

The ten promises of Theresa May to recruit MPs to vote for her deal

The & # 39; new & # 39; Theresa May's Brexit deal includes a ten-point offer to MPs.

1. Government will try to conclude alternative arrangements to replace the Irish backstop by December 2020;

2. A promise that the retroactive effect would come into effect, the government will ensure that Britain stays in line with Northern Ireland;

3. Negotiating objectives and final treaties for our future relationship with the EU will have to be approved by MPs;

4. A new law on workers 'rights guaranteeing workers' rights is no less favorable than in the EU;

5. There will be no change in the level of environmental protection if we leave the EU;

6. The United Kingdom will strive as close as possible to the frictionless trade in goods with the EU as far as possible outside the internal market and put an end to free movement;

7. EU rules for goods and agri-food products are aligned with British rules;

8. MPs vote on whether they prefer her deal with the customs union or the & # 39; compromise & # 39; that she has offered to Labor;

9. A vote for MPs on whether the deal should be subjected to a second referendum

10. A legal obligation to bring about changes to the EU and UK political statements to reflect this new agreement.

During the tough meeting of the cabinet, MailOnline understands that Julian Smith's main whip warned the prime minister that she was staring at the course of defeat.

But she was prevented from making deeper concessions through objections from important Brexiteer ministers.

Mrs. May told her team: & # 39; The withdrawal agreement is the vehicle that brings the UK out of the EU and it is essential to find a way to get it over and over again. & # 39;

A spokesperson for Downing Street said: & # 39; The government has discussed the new deal that the government will present to Parliament to secure the UK's exit from the EU.

& # 39; The discussion included alternative arrangements, employee rights, environmental protection and further guarantees, in particular the integrity of the UK in the unlikely event that the backstop is needed. & # 39;

The answer to Mrs May's last action was cruel.

The Westminster leader of the DUP, Nigel Dodds, said: “We will have to wait for the text of the bill to be published to see what the proposals actually mean, but the fact is that the fatal shortcomings of the draft treaty persist. & # 39;

Former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith said there was nothing new in Mrs. May's latest deal.

& # 39; The back drop is still there, it is a customs union in all but name and it puts Brussels firmly in control of our destination, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; There is nothing new or daring about this poor buffet with non-Brexit options.

& # 39; At a time when people are leaving the main parties, this is the Prime Minister's response to do everything they can to defy the outcome of the referendum.

Mr Rees-Mogg tweeted: & # 39; The latest proposals from the Prime Minister are worse than before and would allow us to be tied down deep in the EU. It is time to start on WTO conditions. & # 39;

Conservative MP and Brexiteer Charlie Elphicke hit the deal as a & # 39; dog breakfast & # 39; that he could not support, despite the fact that he had voted for Mrs. May & # 39; s deal last time.

He said: & # 39; This is even more a dog breakfast than the last deal, it is not a Brexit and I will not support it.

& # 39; The customs union for the backstop is still the core of the agreement and prevents us from concluding trade agreements with the fast-growing economies of the world. & # 39;

Theresa May suggested leaving No10 at the back door after intensive discussions with today's cabinet

Andrea Leadsom repulsed Chancellor Philip Hammond by saying that Great Britain must leave the EU on October 31, no matter what

Andrea Leadsom repulsed Chancellor Philip Hammond by saying that Great Britain must leave the EU on October 31, no matter what

To add to Tory issues tonight, Philip Hammond warns Boris Johnson and other Brexiteer party leader candidates that they & # 39; no mandate & # 39; have for No Deal

To add to Tory issues tonight, Philip Hammond warns Boris Johnson and other Brexiteer party leader candidates that they & # 39; no mandate & # 39; have for No Deal

Andrea Leadsom (pictured today) has returned to Chancellor Philip Hammond by saying that Britain must leave the EU on October 31, whatever happens

PvdA MP Wes Streeting tweeted: & # 39; Many of us have been very clear that the Prime Minister's deal can pass on the condition that people have to decide through a referendum.

& # 39; That is not what the Premier promises that I fear. & # 39; The detail will be reviewed first, but on that basis it is unlikely that I will vote on the bill in second reading. & # 39;

Jeremy Corbyn also made it clear that he would order MPs to oppose the law.

& # 39; Tonight's Prime Minister's proposal seems largely to revive the government's position in the talks between the parties that did not compromise last week, & # 39; he said.

Despite signing the attempt to push through the Brexit law, the government is already at war about what happens after Mrs. May has been driven out – pushing with open leadership.

Philip Hammond warns in a speech tonight that Brexiteer Tories & # 39; no mandate & # 39; has to fall out of the EU.

May & # 39; s emotional plea for MPs to support her Brexit Bill

& # 39; If MPs vote against the second reading of this bill, they vote to stop the Brexit.

& # 39; If they do, the consequences can hardly be greater – reject this deal and leave the EU in the water with a negotiated deal and what would we do then? & # 39;

& # 39; This is a huge opportunity for the UK ….

& # 39; It is practical. It is responsible. It is available.

& # 39; And right now it is slipping away from us. & # 39;

& # 39; Some suggest leaving without an appointment.

& # 39; But whatever you think of that outcome – it is clear to Parliament that it will do everything to stop it.

& # 39; If not, it should be a general election or a second referendum that could lead to withdrawal – and no Brexit at all. & # 39;

& # 39; My opinion about a second referendum is known.

& # 39; See what this debate does to our politics.

Extending for months – perhaps indefinitely – risks opening the door to a future of the nightmare of permanently polarized politics.

& # 39; Look around the world and consider the health of liberal democratic politics. & # 39;

But Mr. Leadsom hit the Chancellor back in an interview by saying that Britain must leave the EU at all costs on October 31.

Downing Street hopes to convince Labor MPs in Brexit areas to rebel against Jeremy Corbyn.

But with Tories turning over, dozens would be needed to get the legislation beyond its first major parliamentary obstacle.

Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay has said that the government should now & # 39; prepare for no deal & # 39; when members of parliament throw away Mrs May's deal for the fourth time.

Barclay has the support of new defense minister Penny Mordaunt and leader of the Lower House Lindsom, who said today that a customs union demanded by Labor would not be acceptable to her.

the bill of the termination agreement, but warned against it and stressed the need to be prepared for a no-deal Brexit.

She said she would only support the bill & # 39; as long as she left the European Union & # 39; – something that she described as outside the internal market and the customs union.

Mrs. Leadsom told BBC Radio 4 today: "I will continue to support the Prime Minister to get her law-repair agreement through. It will leave the European Union and as long as it continues to leave the European Union, I will continue to support it.

& # 39; What I do think is that for a negotiation to succeed, you must be prepared to walk away. & # 39;

She added: & # 39; I would like us to have a deal, but if we come to the end of October and it is not possible to close a deal, leaving the EU is the most important thing & # 39 ;.

On the other hand, Mr Hammond will use a keynote speech tonight to explode top candidates, including Boris Johnson, by saying that those who advocate No Deal hijack the result of the referendum & # 39 ;.

Rory Stewart, the new international development secretary, said that No Deal should come off the table before God and that should be a second referendum.

Cabinet minister Amber Rudd (pictured today) has warned against the party moving to & # 39; extremist forces & # 39; swings

Cabinet minister Amber Rudd (pictured today) has warned against the party moving to & # 39; extremist forces & # 39; swings

Liz Truss, Treasury's chief secretary, has not ruled out No Deal

Liz Truss, Treasury's chief secretary, has not ruled out No Deal

Cabinet minister Amber Rudd (pictured today) has warned against the party moving to & # 39; extremist forces & # 39; bounces to fight the rise of the Brexit party and is opposed to a No Deal pastor like Liz Truss

Health Secretary Matt Hancock arrives with caramel waffles to attend the cabinet's weekly meeting

Health Secretary Matt Hancock arrives with caramel waffles to attend the cabinet's weekly meeting

Health Secretary Matt Hancock arrives with caramel waffles to attend the cabinet's weekly meeting

State Secretary for International Development Rory Stewart has said that No Deal should be completely taken off the table

State Secretary for International Development Rory Stewart has said that No Deal should be completely taken off the table

Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt disagrees and says No Deal should be the last resort, but remains on the table

Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt disagrees and says No Deal should be the last resort, but remains on the table

State Secretary for International Development Rory Stewart has said that No Deal should be taken off the table completely – Foreign Minister Jeremy Hunt disagrees

In a podcast for the ConservativeHome site, Mr. Rees-Mogg was asked about his intentions in the impending Brexit vote.

& # 39; The reason for voting (the Prime Minister's Brexit deal) on the third attempt was to ensure that we were able to leave well in time. That was lost, & he said.

Corbyn says he does NOT support PM's Brexit plan and calls it a & # 39; rehash of the same old deal & # 39;

Jeremy Corbyn accused the & # 39; brave & # 39; New Deal Brexit from Theresa May as a & # 39; rehash & # 39; tonight when her last attempt to rattle an agreement by Parliament seemed doomed to fail.

The opposition leader, who broke talks with the Prime Minister's top team last week after weeks of deadlock, actually called it & # 39; repackaging the same old bad deal, rejected three times & # 39 ;.

His cruel assessment came when Labor MPs from across the party were out to condemn the new plan before it was even put to the vote.

A large number of Jeremy Corbyn's backbenchers said they would not support it, although she had made a whole series of concessions to get them into the aylobby.

Mr Corbyn said: “With regard to the key elements – customs, market coordination and environmental protection – what the Prime Minister calls her new Brexit deal, it is in fact a repackaging of the same old bad deal, rejected three times by the Parliament.

& # 39; We will of course look seriously at the details of the law amendment agreement when it is published.

& # 39; But we will not support a repackaged version of the same old deal – and it is clear that this weak and disintegrating government is unable to meet its own obligations. & # 39;

Mr Rees-Mogg said that Mrs. May's deal was very bad & # 39; used to be. & # 39; As we have already been delayed, it is difficult to see any point in having a bill that does not comply with the European elections, does not bring us out on time, does not initiate the process in a way who may have worked with a new one. leader comes in. & # 39;

The move is more proof that Mrs May's support is slipping away, putting her on the right track for an even more serious rejection than in March – when the third attempt to close her deal was rejected with 58 votes.

Mr Rees-Mogg said that he had previously supported the Brexit package so that the United Kingdom & # 39; in good time & # 39; could leave, but it would now have a & # 39; weight around the neck & # 39; from the next Tory leader.

Former Brexit secretary David Davis has also announced that he will oppose the bill when it comes to a vote, expected on 7 June.

Boris Johnson has yet to say if he will change sides, with leadership enemies insisting that the decision is a & # 39; huge test & # 39; will be to determine if he is fit to fill the top job.

In a speech to the CBI tonight, the Chancellor rounds up those who claim that leaving without a deal is the only & # 39; legitimate Brexit & # 39; is.

He will say: & # 39; On the populist right there are people who claim that the only outcome that counts as a truly legitimate Brexit is to leave with No Deal.

& # 39; Let me remind them – the 2016 Leave campaign was clear that we were leaving with a deal.

& # 39; So to argue for No Deal is to hijack the result of the referendum and thereby knowingly and harmfully harm our economy and standard of living, because all preparation in the world will not avoid the effects of No Deal. & # 39;

He will warn that if MPs do not quickly accept a deal, there is a & # 39; real risk & # 39; exists that the next prime minister & # 39; leaves the search for a deal and shifts to looking for a harmful No Deal exit as a matter of policy & # 39 ;.

Colleague minister Amber Rudd warned yesterday against the party moving to & # 39; extremist forces & # 39; stumbled to fight the rise of the Brexit party. She also took a vague veil from Johnson and others who wore a No Deal Brexit and said: & # 39; We must … accept the untruths presented as simple choices. & # 39;

Miss Rudd spoke for the launch of the One Nation Caucus group of Tory MPs, opposing candidates who support No Deal. Sir Nicholas Soames, another founder of the 60-strong group, said that Tories must resist demands from & # 39; the crazy edge of the party & # 39 ;.

At a cabinet meeting today, ministers will wonder whether Labor's request to the UK to continue accepting new EU laws on labor rights and environmental standards after the Brexit.

Labor deal & # 39; a boost for EU polls & # 39;

The Tories and Labor would be rewarded by voters if Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn made a deal to stay in the customs union, it was claimed last night.

A poll showed that on Thursday the parties would get more seats in the elections to the European Parliament if they reached an agreement on the Brexit.

The projection by Electoral Calculus, using a ComRes survey of 4,161 people, found that the Brexit party from Nigel Farage is expected to get 28 MEPs, Labor 20, Liberal Democrats 11, Tories six and Greens a. But if Mrs. May and Mr. Corbyn had made a deal where they stayed in the customs union until 2022, the Tories would get ten seats and work 22.

Pro-Remain activist Gina Miller, who commissioned the investigation, said it demonstrated that Mr. Corbyn's unwillingness to leave the Brexit behind really harms his party's election prospects.

Yesterday, former Secretary for Work and Pensions, Esther McVey, was the first leading candidate who made it clear that she was willing to leave the EU without closing a deal.

She said it was & # 39; essential & # 39; was that Britain left as planned, insisting that there would be no & # 39; relapse, & # 39 ;, and added: & # 39; If it means without a deal, we are free. & # 39;

Her fellow candidates Boris Johnson, Dominic Raab, Andrea Leadsom and Liz Truss are also expected to confirm that they are serious about the No Deal option if the EU refuses to avenge itself.

In the meantime, potential leaders with leadership links got close to each other in a debate about the future of the party.

Liz Truss, Treasury Secretary, said she & # 39; maybe & # 39; would run for the top course. She added that members & # 39; proud & # 39; must be conservative, and claim: & # 39; If we don't look like a fun party, no one else will vote for us. & # 39;

Health Secretary Matt Hancock refused to exclude running and said the Tories & # 39; toast & # 39; would be if they would call an election before the Brexit.

The former Brexit secretary, Mr. Raab, warned that this week's European election results give an idea of ​​what will happen if we do not understand what will happen if you fail to keep your promises & # 39 ;.

Brexit minister James Cleverly told the group: & # 39; The time you start running in a race is just after the starting gun, not just before. & # 39;

Boris Johnson scrambles to relieve Tory's embarrassment because of his tough Brexit plans amid claims that allies could be MPs if they block him for a leadership struggle

Boris Johnson (shown last week in London) scrambles to help Tory feel moderate fears about his hard Brexit plans

Boris Johnson (shown last week in London) scrambles to help Tory feel moderate fears about his hard Brexit plans

Boris Johnson (shown last week in London) scrambles to help Tory feel moderate fears about his hard Brexit plans

Boris Johnson scrambles to calm Tory, moderate fears about his tough Brexit plans as the battle for success warms up Theresa May.

The former Foreign Minister praised a number of & # 39; One Nation Conservative & # 39; principles, drafted by dozens of moderate MPs who insisted on Twitter: & # 39; Agree with all this. & # 39;

The intervention comes when a & # 39; Stop Boris & # 39; campaign in the parliamentary party starts and many MPs are concerned that he will dramatically shift the Tories to the right.

Secretary of Work and Pensions Amber Rudd – an important remnant in the cabinet – fed up talking about a & # 39; dream card & # 39; alliance with Mr. Johnson by appreciating his tweet.

A source in the One Nation Tory block told the Newsnight of the BBC: & We want candidates to work with us to shape the policy. Not just on Brexit but on everything.

& # 39; The entire game will be a big test for Boris to prove that he can really unite the party as he says he can. & # 39;

Boris Johnson praised a number of & # 39; One Nation Conservative & # 39; principles, drafted by dozens of moderate MPs, and insisted on Twitter: & # 39; Agree with all this. & # 39;

Boris Johnson praised a number of & # 39; One Nation Conservative & # 39; principles, drafted by dozens of moderate MPs, and insisted on Twitter: & # 39; Agree with all this. & # 39;

Boris Johnson praised a number of & # 39; One Nation Conservative & # 39; principles, drafted by dozens of moderate MPs, and insisted on Twitter: & # 39; Agree with all this. & # 39;

Mr Johnson's prospects could also be strengthened by a Labor activist survey suggesting that he is the opponent they most fear in the next election

Mr Johnson's prospects could also be strengthened by a Labor activist survey suggesting that he is the opponent they most fear in the next election

Mr Johnson's prospects could also be strengthened by a Labor activist survey suggesting that he is the opponent they most fear in the next election

Mr Johnson's prospects could also have been stimulated by a poll of workers' activists who suggested that he was the opponent they most feared in the next election.

The rising tensions between Tory, however, were underlined by claims that Mr. Johnson's allies are ready to take on a legal challenge if MPs block him for the final vote.

Under the rules of the competition, MPs smaller the candidates to two, with activists choosing the winner.

But an ally of Mr. Johnson said to the sun: “We have legal advice prepared for Boris that proves that in large numbers members want to have a chance to vote for him, MPs and CCHQ can't prevent that. & # 39;

Auxiliary staff denied knowledge of the legal advice and said it was & # 39; total nonsense & # 39; used to be.

Approximately 60 Tory MPs have joined the One Nation principles drawn up by Ms. May & # 39; s former policy chief George Freeman.

.