Max Mosley is elevated in new film about his campaigns in India and against the British press

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Spider from the grave? Former F1 chief Max Mosley is elevated in new film about his campaigns in India and against the British press (made by a company in which he owned shares)

  • Mosley: It’s Complicated Has Been Announced As An Independent Film For Release
  • But the former Formula 1 chief had a stake in production company Media Diamond Ltd
  • Their financial interest in the company is not indicated in an advance on the film

Anti-press campaigner Max Mosley is hated in a big-screen documentary made by a film company in which he was a shareholder.

Mosley: It’s Complicated has been announced as an independent film ahead of its scheduled release in theaters next month.

But documents show that the former Formula 1 chief, who died last month at the age of 81, had a stake in the production company Media Diamond Ltd with his wife.

Their financial stake in the company is not indicated in an advance of the 90-minute documentary that The Mail on Sunday saw.

Mosley: It’s Complicated has been announced as an independent film ahead of its scheduled release in theaters next month. He is pictured with Hugh Grant in 2011

The film largely focuses on his efforts to reduce road deaths in India by improving car safety and his press regulation campaign after winning £60,000 in damages from News of the World.

The now-defunct newspaper is said to have invaded its privacy by revealing a sadomasochistic orgy involving five prostitutes in 2008.

But questions about his father, Sir Oswald Mosley, leader of the British Union of Fascists, and his own involvement in far-right politics are scarce.

Asked about his father’s opinion, Mr. Mosley says, “Everything he did… he did because he thought it would benefit other people.”

The film largely focuses on his efforts to reduce road deaths in India by improving car safety and his press regulation campaign after winning £60,000 in damages from the News of the World

The film largely focuses on his efforts to reduce road deaths in India by improving car safety and his press regulation campaign after winning £60,000 in damages from News of the World

The documentary features an interview with Bernie Ecclestone, who, along with Mr Mosley, revolutionized F1.

The billionaire apologizes for not supporting his boyfriend after the sex scandal and reveals that he suggested Margaret Thatcher give Mosley a job in her cabinet. he thought his father’s history might be holding him back.’

Actor Hugh Grant, who supported Mosley’s crusade against newspapers, also praises him, although there is no room for comment from anti-racism groups or those in the newspaper industry who are heavily criticized.

Mr Mosley claims that one or more of the three F1 figures orchestrated the News of the World sting but does not name them and provide no evidence of collusion.

He denies a friend’s claim that he leaked a photo of Jean-Marie Balestre, the former president of F1’s governing body, wearing a Nazi uniform during a bitter battle for control of the sport.

At the release of the film, director Michael Shevloff calls Mr. Mosley “an extraordinary man” who has saved tens of thousands of lives with his work on car safety.

He said the work was “completely conceived, created and edited independently” and that Mr Mosley “had no editorial input or control”.

When asked why it was about road safety and not Mosley’s far-right affiliations, he added: ‘The film is my portrait of his life and a record of the time we followed him. Everyone is entitled to their opinion. I believe the film speaks for itself.’

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