Master's student takes the university to court after failing a task about dogs

The student of masters of the University of Monash Chinmay Naik failed a task that did on the negative stereotypes of the dogs

Master's student takes the university to the Supreme Court for failing a task about dogs, after complaining to the prime minister about his low qualification

  • A student from Melbourne is determined to pass a task he wrote about dogs
  • Chinmay Naik will take Monash University to court after failing to evaluate
  • He is determined to approve, he has even asked for help from the former prime minister

Kelsey Wilkie for Daily Mail Australia

A journalism student takes his college to court after he failed a task.

The student of masters of the University of Monash Chinmay Naik failed a task on the negative stereotypes of the dogs.

His task, which included interviews with people walking dogs, initially received 12 points out of 100. He was marked for the second time, but that only improved his qualification a bit.

But Mr. Naik is not accepting his result, the Herald Sun reported.

The student of masters of the University of Monash Chinmay Naik failed a task that did on the negative stereotypes of the dogs

The student of masters of the University of Monash Chinmay Naik failed a task that did on the negative stereotypes of the dogs

The man from Oakleigh South has taken his case to the Supreme Court in the hope of revoking his trademark.

According to court documents, Naik claims that the university acted "illegally". by not revealing who marked the task a second time. He believes that the same person rated the task twice.

Mr. Naik feels he deserves a "minimal approval mark," according to court documents.

Marker notes state that the task questions about dogs were too general and not connected. "There is no narrative structure, only one photo of overlap, there are no interviews with experts, there is no clear beginning / middle / end," the notes say.

His task, which included interviews with people walking dogs, initially received 12 points out of 100 (stock image)

His task, which included interviews with people walking dogs, initially received 12 points out of 100 (stock image)

His task, which included interviews with people walking dogs, initially received 12 points out of 100 (stock image)

"For what is supposed to be the main allocation of the unit, this does not meet any of the minimum criteria."

Your case before the Supreme Court this month is not your first attempt to change your brand.

The dispute over the failed brand has been brought to the office of the Australian Prime Minister, the Human Rights Commission and the Ombudsman. However, all your requests for help have been rejected.

The notes of the markers read: "For what is supposed to be the main allocation of the unit, this does not meet any of the minimum criteria."

The notes of the markers read: "For what is supposed to be the main allocation of the unit, this does not meet any of the minimum criteria."

The notes of the markers read: "For what is supposed to be the main allocation of the unit, this does not meet any of the minimum criteria."

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