Massive earthquakes can cause tremors on the opposite side of the Earth

The maps above show how large earthquakes (small red circles) trigger other tremors within 30 degrees of their antipodes, or opposite points (green dots). (a) M8.8 earthquake in Chile, February 27, 2010, followed by ten events (b) M7.6 in the Solomon Islands, 12/4/2014, followed by M6.8. (c) M7.7, 11/14/2007 and M6.8 shown (d) M7.6, 2/2/1975 and M7.0. 4.5 days of data shown in both. (e, f) When the first source event initiates a second large event, it follows the seismic chaining. (e) illustrate M7.6 in Nicaragua (9/2/1992) followed by M6.7 in Indonesia (3.5 days of data shown). (f) starts with an event M7.7 (10/10/2002) followed by an M6.9 in Brazil (5.5 days of data are shown)

Earthquakes are sometimes so powerful that they cause other earthquakes on the other side of the world.

New research on seismic data from 1973 to 2016 found that a three-day window tends to follow large earthquakes, during which other tremors are more likely to occur.

While aftershocks in the same region as the initial earthquake are often considered the only resulting seismic activity, the new study shows a "clearly detectable" increase in earthquakes of 5.0 or more after the first event.

The maps above show how large earthquakes (small red circles) trigger other tremors within 30 degrees of their antipodes, or opposite points (green dots). (a) M8.8 earthquake in Chile, February 27, 2010, followed by ten events (b) M7.6 in the Solomon Islands, 12/4/2014, followed by M6.8. (c) M7.7, 11/14/2007 and M6.8 shown (d) M7.6, 2/2/1975 and M7.0. 4.5 days of data shown in both. (e, f) When the first source event initiates a second large event, it follows the seismic chaining. (e) illustrate M7.6 in Nicaragua (9/2/1992) followed by M6.7 in Indonesia (3.5 days of data shown). (f) starts with an event M7.7 (10/10/2002) followed by an M6.9 in Brazil (5.5 days of data are shown)

The maps above show how large earthquakes (small red circles) trigger other tremors within 30 degrees of their antipodes, or opposite points (green dots). (a) M8.8 earthquake in Chile, February 27, 2010, followed by ten events (b) M7.6 in the Solomon Islands, 12/4/2014, followed by M6.8. (c) M7.7, 11/14/2007 and M6.8 shown (d) M7.6, 2/2/1975 and M7.0 (e) M7.6 in Nicaragua, 9/2/1992, followed by M6.7 in Indonesia (f) event M7.7, 10/10/2002 followed by M6.9 in Brazil

Researchers at Oregon State University investigated the side effects of earthquakes of magnitude 6.5 or greater over 44 years of data.

To accompany the test cases, which represented a three-day window "injected" with one of these large earthquakes, the team also used a control group of 5,355 three-day periods that did not have an earthquake injection.

And they discovered that larger earthquakes seemed to trigger other earthquakes outside the replica area in the following days.

"The test cases showed a clearly detectable increase over the reference rates," said the study's corresponding author, Robert O'Malley, a researcher at OSU's School of Agricultural Sciences.

The researchers also warn that larger earthquakes have also become more common in recent years. An image of the devastation that followed the Fukushima earthquake in 2011 is shown

The researchers also warn that larger earthquakes have also become more common in recent years. An image of the devastation that followed the Fukushima earthquake in 2011 is shown

The researchers also warn that larger earthquakes have also become more common in recent years. An image of the devastation that followed the Fukushima earthquake in 2011 is shown

& # 39; Earthquakes are part of a cycle of accumulation and release of tectonic stress. As fault zones near the end of this seismic cycle, inflection points can be reached and firing can occur. "

According to the researchers, earthquakes of greater magnitude were more common after major events than smaller ones.

They also found that these follow-up events were more likely to occur almost exactly on the other side of the Earth, with most occurring within 30 degrees of the point opposite the initial earthquake.

HOW IS THE EARTHQUAKE MEASURED?

The magnitude of an earthquake differs from its intensity.

The magnitude of an earthquake refers to the measurement of the energy released where the earthquake originated.

The magnitude is calculated based on measurements on seismographs.

The intensity of an earthquake refers to the force of the tremor produced by the sensation.

A 5.3-magnitude earthquake shook the Channel Islands off the coast of southern California on Thursday at 10:30 a.m.

A 5.3-magnitude earthquake shook the Channel Islands off the coast of southern California on Thursday at 10:30 a.m.

A 5.3-magnitude earthquake shook the Channel Islands off the coast of southern California on Thursday at 10:30 a.m.

According to the United States Geological Survey, "intensity is determined from the effects on people, human structures and the natural environment."

Earthquakes originate below the surface of the earth in a region called hypocenter.

During an earthquake, a part of a seismograph remains stationary and a part moves with the surface of the earth.

The earthquake is then measured by the difference in the positions of the still and moving parts of the seismograph.

The tremors of greater magnitude, the researchers point out, have also become more common in recent years.

"Understanding the mechanics of how an earthquake might start another while separating widely in the distance and time is still largely speculative," O & # 39; Malley said.

"But regardless of the specific mechanics involved, the evidence shows that activation occurs, followed by a period of rest and recharge."

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