Mass migration costs taxpayers more than $ 4.5 billion while Australia struggles with 160,000 a year

Billions of dollars will be spent on infrastructure to cope with the population pressure caused by years of mass migration, the government's new population plan has revealed.

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The plan, released on Monday, revealed that Sydney, Melbourne and Southeast Queensland have absorbed 75 percent of the nation's population growth over the past 10 years, crushing public transport, blocking roads, driving up housing costs and putting infrastructure under pressure .

& # 39; The motorways have been delayed, trains sometimes have a crushing capacity and housing has not always kept pace & # 39 ;, the report said, Planning for the future population of Australia.

& # 39; Avoidable congestion is estimated to cost $ 25 billion and is expected to reach $ 40 billion by 2030 without further changes. & # 39;

Since 2010, migration rates have been higher than birth rates, with around 59 percent of Australia's total population growth through migration and 41 percent due to natural increase, the report said.

Of those who migrate to Australia, the vast majority have moved to urban areas.

Over the past 20 years, migrants have contributed nearly two-thirds of Sydney's population growth and half of all population growth in Melbourne and Perth, the report said.

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The number of migrants has overwhelmed the natural increase in births from deaths since 2010 by 59 percent to 41 percent each year.

The number of migrants has overwhelmed the natural increase in births from deaths since 2010 by 59 percent to 41 percent each year.

International students have increased the pressure, with more than 1,400,000 international student visas since June 2015 according to figures from the Interior Department.

The population growth must be sustainable, according to the report.

& # 39; It has to happen at a pace where infrastructure and services can be set up that connect to the growing population. If this does not happen, the result is increased congestion, house pressure, pollution and lack of support and facilities. This has negative consequences for the quality of life. & # 39;

The report revealed that permanent migration will remain at a high level in the near future, with 160,000 people – more than the Darwinian population – imported every year for the next four years.

The government has said it will try to persuade foreign students to study at regional universities to relieve pressure on cities. More than 1.4 million foreign students have received a visa since 2015

The government has said it will try to persuade foreign students to study at regional universities to relieve pressure on cities. More than 1.4 million foreign students have received a visa since 2015

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The government has said it will try to persuade foreign students to study at regional universities to relieve pressure on cities. More than 1.4 million foreign students have received a visa since 2015

The total population of Australia is expected to increase from 25 million to 29.5 million by 2029, the report said.

Both Sydney and Melbourne are expected to add just over a million people each, rising to 6.4 million and 6.3 million respectively in the next decade, according to the figures in the report.

The Morrison government said Monday that the permanent migration intake was reduced from 190,000 a year and that it would try to divert new migrants to regional areas to relieve pressure on Sydney and Melbourne.

The population minister, Alan Tudge, said the annual cap of 160,000 would include 23,000 skills visas, requiring people to work outside the big cities for three years before being eligible for permanent residence.

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Seven designated area migration agreements have been concluded to allow regional employers to sponsor skilled workers.

Changes have also been made to the temporary graduate visa for international students who have completed their studies on a regional campus of a university so that they can continue to live and work in regional Australia, the report said.

$ 4 billion will be spent on an urban congestion fund to try to reduce the pressure on the roads

$ 4 billion will be spent on an urban congestion fund to try to reduce the pressure on the roads

$ 4 billion will be spent on an urban congestion fund to try to reduce the pressure on the roads

Mr. Tudge said the plan would also create incentives to encourage international students to go to regional areas and smaller cities to study.

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The government will also spend billions of dollars on infrastructure to try to alleviate congestion in the pressure capitals.

The report marked an urban congestion fund of $ 4 billion to try and reduce pressure on the roads, such as last year when thousands of potential beachgoers walked the streets of Sydney for miles.

Other infrastructure expenditures to relieve pressure and move people to the & # 39; s regions include $ 4.5 billion of regional roads connecting ports, airports and freight routes in an effort to boost regional employment, $ 9.3 billion for an indoor corridor that stretches from Melbourne to Brisbane and $ 2 billion for a fast train connection from Melbourne to Geelong.

Economist Leith Van Onselen, who worked for Treasury, Goldman Sachs and now writes for the Macrobusiness website, was dizzy about both the coalition and the Labor plans to cope with mass migration through infrastructure spending or redirection to regional areas.

Commuters at Flinders Street Station in Melbourne. The population of Melbourne is expected to swell by more than one million people by 2029, putting additional pressure on infrastructure

Commuters at Flinders Street Station in Melbourne. The population of Melbourne is expected to swell by more than one million people by 2029, putting additional pressure on infrastructure

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Commuters at Flinders Street Station in Melbourne. The population of Melbourne is expected to swell by more than one million people by 2029, putting additional pressure on infrastructure

& # 39; The only & # 39; & # 39; solution to maintain Australia's viability is to reduce immigration to historical levels – well below 100,000 people per year – so that housing and infrastructure can keep pace, & # 39; he wrote Monday.

& # 39; Everything else deals with symptoms, not the cause, and are only policy smoke screens. & # 39;

Daily Mail Australia has asked Mr. Tudge's office for economic modeling to show the cost-benefit analysis of mass migration set at 160,000 a year.

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