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Maryland woman, 73, is impaled in the groin by a 100-pound SAILFISH that leapt out of the ocean

Maryland woman, 73, is impaled in the groin by a 100-pound SAIL FISH that jumped out of the ocean at her while fishing off the coast of Florida

  • Katherine Perkins, 73, was struck by a sailfish off the coast of Stuart, FL on Tuesday
  • The fish jumped out of the water and speared her while she was in the boat
  • Her fishing buddy had caught the 100-pounder and tried to take a picture
  • She told the deputy it happened so fast she didn’t have time to react

A 73-year-old woman was stabbed by a 100-pound sailfish while fishing with some friends off the coast of Florida.

The fish speared Katherine Perkins, of Maryland, in the groin area with its pointed bill on Tuesday while standing in the boat when two companions tried to reel it in on a fishing line.

Her friends called 911 and applied pressure to the wound as she was transported to nearby HCA Florida Lawnwood Hospital.

While her current condition is unknown, Perkins is said to be in hospital on Thursday to recover.

Katherine Perkins, 73, (pictured) was stabbed Tuesday by a 100-pound sailfish while fishing with some friends off the coast of Stuart, Florida

Katherine Perkins, 73, (pictured) was stabbed Tuesday by a 100-pound sailfish while fishing with some friends off the coast of Stuart, Florida

Perkins and her friends were in a boat near Stuart, a coastal town north of West Palm Beach that is considered the sailfish capital of the world, when they caught the 100-pound sailfish (file photo)

Perkins and her friends were in a boat near Stuart, a coastal town north of West Palm Beach that is considered the sailfish capital of the world, when they caught the 100-pound sailfish (file photo)

Perkins and her friends were in a boat near Stuart, a coastal town north of West Palm Beach that’s considered the sailfish capital of the world, when they caught the 100-pound sailfish.

The big fish attacked Perkins, who was standing next to the center console, as her companions tried to take a picture with it, the Martin County Sheriff’s Office confirmed. Treasure Coast Newspapers.

“The sailfish jumped out of the water and stabbed Katherine in the groin area as she stood next to the center console,” authorities said.

Stuart residents Louis Toth, 75, and Dominic Bellezza, 77, applied pressure to her wound as she was transported to hospital.

It’s unclear if either of the two were responsible for bringing in the 100-pounder.

Perkins told a sheriff’s deputy that the incident happened so quickly she didn’t even have time to respond.

Perkins and her fishing buddy were in a boat near Stuart (pictured) when the 100-pound fish jumped out of the water and impaled her crotch

Perkins and her fishing buddy were in a boat near Stuart (pictured) when the 100-pound fish jumped out of the water and impaled her crotch

Her friends called 911 and put pressure on the wound as she was transported to nearby HCA Florida Lawnwood Hospital (pictured), where she was reportedly recovering on Thursday.

Her friends called 911 and put pressure on the wound as she was transported to nearby HCA Florida Lawnwood Hospital (pictured), where she was reportedly recovering on Thursday.

Sailfish can grow to 11 feet in length and up to 220 pounds and are among the fastest species of fish in the ocean.

Like the swordfish, sailfish are recognizable by their elongated, pointed beaks. They are strong fighters and are known for diving deep and pulling on trolling reels in an attempt to dislodge fish hooks.

While sailfish are usually released, Floridians try to fish for them. There’s even a tournament where many residents of Stuart and nearby Fort Pierce try to land sailfish.

The largest sailfish caught in Florida weighed 126 pounds, according to state records. It was brought in on June 13, 2009 by Larry Maier of Big Pine Key.

During the Pelican Yacht Club Invitational Billfish Tournament in January 2019, 38 fishing boats caught and released a record 969 sailfish over the course of three days.

Wildlife experts advise people to photograph sailfish without pulling them out of the water.

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