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Study corrected the timeline of when the & # 39; Late Heavy Bombardment & # 39; ended and it states that life could flourish between 4.2 billion and 3.5 billion years ago (stock photo)

Mars may have hosted life BEFORE the earth as scientists change the timeline of the red planet and say it could have been habitable 4.2 billion years ago

  • Study corrected the timeline of when the & # 39; Late Heavy Bombardment & # 39; ended up
  • Evidence of ancient Martian rocks claims it stopped 4.48 billion years ago
  • Life could flourish between 4.2 billion and 3.5 billion years ago
  • This is from before the time that life on earth first flourished with around 500 million years
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Scientists have adjusted the timeline of the formative years on Mars and claim that the red planet could be the home of life before the earth was habitable.

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A study has the timing of the moment when the crater surface was no longer bombarded with meteorites and says that life developed between 4.2 billion and 3.5 billion years ago.

This, the authors claim, dates back to the time that the earth became a thriving oasis for 500 million years.

Study corrected the timeline of when the & # 39; Late Heavy Bombardment & # 39; ended and it states that life could flourish between 4.2 billion and 3.5 billion years ago (stock photo)

Study corrected the timeline of when the & # 39; Late Heavy Bombardment & # 39; ended and it states that life could flourish between 4.2 billion and 3.5 billion years ago (stock photo)

WHAT IS THE LAST HEAVY DEATH?

Much of the action on Mars took place during a period known as the Late Heavy Bombardment, about 3.9 billion years ago, when the developing solar system was a shooting gallery of comets, asteroids, moons and planets.

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Unlike Earth, which has appeared again and again & # 39; & # 39; due to erosion and plate tectonics, heavy crater is still visible on Mercury, the Earth's moon and Mars.

The end of the Late Heavy Bombardment has been heavily discussed.

Studies claim it ended about 4.5 billion years ago, and the relative calm that ensued ensured that life could flourish.

Like most of the inner solar system, the planets formed about 4.5 billion years ago and it was a chaotic environment full of impacts and meteors and the planets continued to form and grow.

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The disorder of the solar system eventually calmed down and the impact of the so-called Late Heavy Bombardment ceased.

This then gave birth to a calmer period around 4.48 billion years ago, when giant, life-threatening meteorites stopped hitting the red planet and Mars the first & # 39; real opportunity & # 39; gifts to develop life.

The end of the Late Heavy Bombardment has been heavily discussed, but a team from Western University studied the oldest mineral grains from meteorites that are believed to have originated from the southern highlands of Mars.

They were once part of Mars, but came into the air during a violent collision and landed on Earth. There are around 120 known monsters in the world.

They studied them at an almost atomic level and were able to take a snapshot of what the surface of Mars was billions of years ago.

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Dr. Desmond Moser found the oldest minerals in these rocks, zircon and baddeleyite, dating between 4.43 and 4.48 billion years old.

They also did not show the significant signs of huge meteor effects, such as high temperatures and pressures. This indicates that they were formed after the bombing stopped.

It was dated using the slow decay of uranium in lead in the samples, which can be mapped to give a correct picture of the actual age.

& # 39; We have not found any of these bombardment signatures in the zircon and baddeleyite grains of Mars & # 39 ;, Dr. Moser New scientist.

& # 39; We know there was a huge impact on Mars, but it must be older than 4.48 billion years ago.

It is generally believed that the earth became an oasis some 3.5 billion years ago and the latest study claims that this is around 500 million years after Mars would have been inhabited after the end of the Late Heavy Bombardment.
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It is generally believed that the earth became an oasis some 3.5 billion years ago and the latest study claims that this is around 500 million years after Mars would have been inhabited after the end of the Late Heavy Bombardment.

It is generally believed that the earth became an oasis some 3.5 billion years ago and the latest study claims that this is around 500 million years after Mars would have been inhabited after the end of the Late Heavy Bombardment.

& # 39; The implication is that perhaps half a billion years ago there could be a platform that honored life than previously thought it was possible in the inner solar system. & # 39;

It is believed that the huge event, which is now being pushed back further into Mars' childhood, may have contributed to laying the platform for creating viable conditions.

& # 39; Gigantic meteorite effects on Mars between 4.2 and 3.5 billion years ago may have accelerated the introduction of early waters from the interior of the planet, creating the stage for life-forming responses & # 39 ;, said dr Moser in a statement.

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& # 39; This work may indicate good places to get monsters back from Mars. & # 39;

The work was published in the magazine Nature Geoscience.

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