Married actress Jeni Barnett says tying the knot is a patriarchal tradition

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Married actress and broadcaster Jeni Barnett has argued that marriage is a patriarchal tradition, urging tied women to ‘stay who you are’.

Jeni, 72, of London, who married 11 years after their relationship with actor Jim Bywater, appeared on Good Morning Britain alongside Debbie McGee today to discuss whether the marriage is inherently sexist.

The host of Great Food Live said she only married her long-term partner so that her child would become ‘legit’ but felt too ‘trapped’ to wear her wedding ring for six months – and told women that ‘you don’t chattel ‘.

Meanwhile, Debbie, 62, who was married to the late magician Paul Daniels for 28 years, like several other traditions, said marriage has evolved over the years, with viewers agreeing that it is up to individual couples which ones they use on. their big day.

It comes after the news that both the mother and father of the bride and groom will be named on marriage certificates, rather than just fathers, in the biggest shake up of the registry system in 200 years.

Married actress Jeni Barnett (pictured) claims marriage is a patriarchal tradition, calling on women who do get married to ‘stay who you are’

Jeni appeared on Good Morning Britain today alongside Debbie McGee (pictured) to discuss whether the marriage is inherently sexist

Jeni appeared on Good Morning Britain today alongside Debbie McGee (pictured) to discuss whether the marriage is inherently sexist

“It’s definitely a sign of love and commitment and all things romantic,” Jeni said. But the romance ends after a few years. I think the tradition is being turned upside down, which means the traditions are changing.

“What we old feminists say is it’s okay to get married and have a wonderful romantic gesture, but you have to be who you are and you have to stay who you are, and you are not a possessor.”

When her host Susannah Reid asked her why she decided to get married, despite believing the institution to be sexist, she said, ‘Only after 11 years and I did it because we had a kid and I was afraid if I died , he should have done paperwork and he wouldn’t have done it, i got married so the child would become legit, that’s why we did it. ‘

Jeni went on to say that progress still needs to be made on equality for women, and that she did not want to wear her wedding ring or take her husband’s name for months.

Viewers were unimpressed by Jeni's argument, with some claiming that sexist customs, such as wearing white or being walked down the aisle by your father, are not prerequisites for a wedding

Viewers were unimpressed by Jeni’s argument, with some claiming that sexist customs, such as wearing white or being walked down the aisle by your father, are not prerequisites for a wedding

‘We’ve made tremendous strides for women to be in the 21st century, but there are things we haven’t done.

‘I couldn’t wear the ring for six months because I felt like I was a little bit trapped and didn’t take his name, but I can say after years of marriage you get on with your life and he keeps on being, but I wouldn’t have cared if I hadn’t.

Viewers weren’t impressed by Jeni’s argument, with some claiming that sexist customs, such as wearing a white or being walked down the aisle by your dad, aren’t prerequisites for a wedding.

Is marriage sexist? What about those who want to get married do that and those who don’t. ‘Said one.

Another said, “Isn’t it up to each individual person to decide whether to get married and take their partner’s last name (regardless of the gender of that particular couple)?”

When her host Susannah Reid asked her why she decided to get married, despite believing the institution to be sexist, she said, 'Only after 11 years and I did it because we had a kid'

When her host Susannah Reid asked her why she decided to get married, despite believing the institution to be sexist, she said, ‘Only after 11 years and I did it because we had a kid’

Meanwhile, Debbie said that while weddings may be rooted in sexism, traditions evolve over time.

Meanwhile, Debbie said that while weddings may be rooted in sexism, traditions evolve over time.

Another said: ‘Very little forced with regard to marriage. No one has to wear white, a bride does not have to be ‘given away’ and the bride does not have to take the name of the husband. It is up to each couple to decide; What’s the problem?’

Meanwhile, Debbie said that while weddings may be rooted in sexism, traditions evolve over time.

She said, ‘I just think there are a lot of other traditions, like Christmas trees, Prince Albert was the one who dressed them, that’s a tradition, and it’s your choice these days.

Maybe 50 years ago it was always the father, but it doesn’t have to be. Usually the girl is very close to her father, so I don’t think it has anything to do with the man who says, “This is my wife.”

She believes that certain laws – such as couples’ inheritance tax benefits – should be repealed to prevent people from marrying for legal reasons alone.

“So much has changed and it’s great,” said Debbie. ‘But a lot of people still get married because of our laws and I think they are either laws that need to be changed.

“It should just show that this is the one I love over anyone else, it shouldn’t be about what other people think it should be about two people.”

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