Mark Zuckerberg ‘gave $419.5 MILLION to nonprofits to help likely Democratic voters’

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his wife gave nearly $420 million to nonprofits that helped drive and infrastructure for the 2020 election — and strongly favored Democratic counties, according to a new report.

Zuckerberg, 37, and his wife Priscilla Chan, 36, donated $419.5 million to The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) and The Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR), nonprofit organizations that provide grants to counties and helped fund the election administration.

CTCL and CEIR provided funds to local governments and helped implement administrative practices, voting methods, data sharing agreements and outreach programs, according to the New York Post.

The Chan Zuckerberg Initiative gave CTCL a whopping $350 million in 2020, while the nonprofit’s budget was just $1.4 million in 2018.

But counties that won Biden were three times more likely to get funding than Trump’s, and the Democrat reportedly got a significant boost in swing states.

According to an analysis by the New York Post, Zuckerberg’s money may have helped drive more voters to the polls in Arizona, which Biden won by 10,000 and Georgia by 12,000.

CTCL reportedly demanded the promotion of postal voting practices — which were heavily supported by Democrats — and also helped fund polls and temporary staff, and the rapid proliferation of unsupervised private drop boxes for mail votes.

And in Wisconsin, the money funded “vote navigators” who “help voters, possibly at their front door, answer questions…and witness signatures on absentee ballots.”

Zuckerberg’s contributions to the groups nearly matched federal and state funding for COVID-19-related election costs, which totaled $479.5 million during the 2020 election.

Mark Zuckerberg, 37, and wife Priscilla Chan, 36, funneled $419.5 million to two nonprofits that funded largely Democratic territories in the 2020 election

Mark Zuckerberg, 37, and wife Priscilla Chan, 36, funneled $419.5 million to two nonprofits that funded largely Democratic territories in the 2020 election

CTCL grants, which largely went to Democratic counties, boosted the dollar's value per vote of a Biden voter.  A county that won Biden was 3.5 times more likely to be funded by CTCL and Trump, and on average the dollar per vote for Biden was $2.85 compared to just $0.59 for Trump.  In Philadelphia, Biden's most funded county, the average dollar per vote was $6.32 compared to Berks, Trump's most funded county, which was just $1.12.

CTCL grants, which largely went to Democratic counties, boosted the dollar's value per vote of a Biden voter.  A county that won Biden was 3.5 times more likely to be funded by CTCL and Trump, and on average the dollar per vote for Biden was $2.85 compared to just $0.59 for Trump.  In Philadelphia, Biden's best-funded county, the average dollar per vote was $6.32 compared to Berks, Trump's best-funded county, which was just $1.12.

CTCL grants, which largely went to Democratic counties, boosted the dollar’s value per vote of a Biden voter. A county that won Biden was 3.5 times more likely to be funded by CTCL and Trump, and on average the dollar per vote for Biden was $2.85 compared to just $0.59 for Trump. In Philadelphia, Biden’s most funded county, the average dollar per vote was $6.32 compared to Berks, Trump’s most funded county, which was just $1.12.

Zuckerberg's contributions to the groups nearly matched federal and state funding for COVID-19-related election costs, which totaled $479.5 million during the 2020 election.

Zuckerberg's contributions to the groups nearly matched federal and state funding for COVID-19-related election costs, which totaled $479.5 million during the 2020 election.

Zuckerberg’s contributions to the groups nearly matched federal and state funding for COVID-19-related election costs, which totaled $479.5 million during the 2020 election.

Despite CTCL and CEIR being registered as non-partisan organizations, the New York Post’s analysis found that groups had mainly distributed their money in Democratic areas.

CTCL provided 25 counties with grants of $1 million or more in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia, for a total of $87.5 million in grants. Biden won 23 of those counties in the election.

Wisconsin’s Brown County, which Trump won, received a $1.1 million grant from the nonprofit, which totaled just 1.2 percent of the grants offered in the 25 counties.

But within the province, the financing differences were large.

The Wisconsin legislature gave the city of Green Bay about $7 per voter to conduct the election, while rural areas received $4 per voter.

But CTCL raised funds in Green Bay, an area high in Democrats, to $47 per voter, while rural counties typically stayed at $4.

Similar differences were found in Detroit, Atlanta, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Flint, Dallas and Houston, among others, which received large grants from the nonprofit, according to the New York Post.

CTCL provided 25 grants worth more than $1 million each, totaling $87.5 million, during the election in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia.  Biden won 23 . out of 25 counties

CTCL provided 25 grants worth more than $1 million each, totaling $87.5 million, during the election in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia.  Biden won 23 . out of 25 counties

Wisconsin's Brown County, which Trump won, received a $1.1 million grant from the nonprofit, totaling just 1.2 percent of the grants offered in those 25 counties.

Wisconsin's Brown County, which Trump won, received a $1.1 million grant from the nonprofit, totaling just 1.2 percent of the grants offered in those 25 counties.

CTCL provided 25 grants worth more than $1 million each, totaling $87.5 million, during the election in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Texas and Virginia. Of the 25 counties, Biden won 23. Wisconsin’s Brown County, which won Trump, received a $1.1 million grant from the nonprofit, totaling just 1.2 percent of the grants awarded in that year. 25 provinces were offered.

Preliminary studies of CTCL spending showed that states like Texas received large amounts of money per vote in Democratic counties, such as Dallas, Webb, Cameron and Harris — all of which Hillary Clinton won in the 2016 election.

The most money per vote allocated to a Republican county by the CTCL group was less than $2 in Hays County, compared to the highest Democratic county, which received $10 in Webb County.

Republican strongholds, such as Denton and Collin counties, were not included in the New York Post’s survey because they did not receive CTCL funding.

The New York Post also found that Biden’s counties were 3.5 more likely to receive funding from CTCL. In addition, Trump’s counties received an average of $0.69, while Biden’s counties received an average of $2.85 per capita.

In Georgia, the average Trump counties received an average of $1.91, while the Biden counties received more than $7. Similarly, Philadelphia – the most well-funded Biden district – received an average of $6.32 per capita, compared to just $1.12 in Berks – the most funded Trump area.

Zuckerberg (pictured with his wife) donated money to The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) and The Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR), nonprofit organizations that provided grants to counties and helped fund the election

Zuckerberg (pictured with his wife) donated money to The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) and The Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR), nonprofit organizations that provided grants to counties and helped fund the election

Zuckerberg (pictured with his wife) donated money to The Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) and The Center for Election Innovation and Research (CEIR), nonprofit organizations that provided grants to counties and helped fund the election

Similar analyzes of Georgia and Wisconsin resulted in similar effects, according to the New York Post.

In total, $64.2 million of Zuckerberg’s money was distributed by CEIR to 22 states and the District of Columbia.

The Post report was criticized by Republicans, who accused Zuckerberg of influencing the outcome of the election.

Wisconsin Senator Ron Johnson said, “I keep wondering if Mark Zuckerberg’s highly partisan 2020 election spending was legal.”

And Kentucky Senator Rand Paul tweeted, ‘Are our elections for sale? Did Mark Zuckerberg buy the Wisconsin presidential election?’

The non-profit organizations defended their role.

“These grants helped states inform voters about changes to electoral procedures, polling stations and recruiting polling stations in response to the pandemic,” said David Becker, CEIR’s founder and executive director.

CTCL spokesperson Ben LaBolt told the Post: “While Mark and Priscilla have provided a general grant to CTCL [to] ensured funding was available, they did not participate in the process of determining which jurisdictions received funding, and as a: [nonprofit organization] CTCL is prohibited from engaging in partisan activities.’

Funding and administering elections is generally a government function, not a private function. Private organisations, such as CTCL and CEIR, do not have to follow the same rules as public institutions.

They are not required to hold public hearings, cannot be verified through open records requests, or are subject to government checks and balances.

Biden won the popular election with 81,283,098 votes (51.3 percent), while Trump had 74,222,958 (46.8 percent).

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