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Mark Latham cuts solar energy and says that it has fed ZERO percent of the grid after a storm outage

Mark Latham deposits solar energy as an ‘irresponsible experiment’ and claims that it fed NUL percent of the electricity grid after heavy rain left 150,000 without electricity

  • One nation leader Mark Latham has closed the renewable energy source
  • He said “sunbeds” and described resource as “irresponsible experiment.”
  • He claimed that solar energy contributed zero percent to the NSW energy network
  • Fuel data seems to support Mr. Latham’s claim that solar energy was not used during a storm
  • But at a certain point during a record-breaking flood, the use of solar energy reached six percent
  • The NSW government also maintains that solar energy has grown strongly in the last ten years

Mark Latham has slammed solar energy and claims it didn’t help after the heaviest downpour in 30 years that led to widespread power outages.

The leader of One Nation New South Wales on Tuesday destroyed the renewable resource after heavy wet weather during the weekend in New South Wales.

He said that “sunbeds are out” and is the “most irresponsible” public policy experiment in Australia’s history.

A leader of the state of New South Wales, Mark Latham, has slammed solar energy and claimed it didn't work when heavy rain caused a huge power outage

A leader of the state of New South Wales, Mark Latham, has slammed solar energy and claimed it didn’t work when heavy rain caused a huge power outage

He said “sunbeds out” and is the “most irresponsible experiment” the Australian government has ever conducted

Data from the Australian energy market operator appear to support Latham's claim that solar energy played a negligible role during the height of the flood (stock image of solar panels in the ponds in northwest Sydney)

Data from the Australian energy market operator appear to support Latham's claim that solar energy played a negligible role during the height of the flood (stock image of solar panels in ponds in northwest Sydney)

Data from the Australian energy market operator appear to support Latham’s claim that solar energy played a negligible role during the height of the flood (stock image of solar panels in the ponds in northwest Sydney)

“If it rains, it shows how ineffective solar panels can be,” Mr. Latham wrote on Facebook.

‘At NSW, the energy network is currently 93% powered by Black Coal, 4% hydro, 2% wind and ZERO solar.

“Frankly, renewable energy sources are the wildest, most irresponsible experiment in Australian public policy history.”

Data from the Australian energy market operator appear to support Latham’s claim that solar energy played almost no role during the peak of the Sunday afternoon flood.

On Sunday morning at 6 am, according to the AEMO data, solar energy in New South Wales represented zero percent of fuel consumption.

The use of black coal was 83 percent, with solar energy that generated 0 MWh in the direction of state consumption.

Later in the day, however, the data show that solar energy use has increased to six percent at 1 p.m. and 3 percent at 5 p.m. while the storm continued to drag Sydney and the surrounding regions.

A wet and windy Bondi in the eastern suburbs of Sydney is depicted during the record-breaking rainfall on Sunday

A wet and windy Bondi in the eastern suburbs of Sydney is depicted during the record-breaking rainfall on Sunday

A wet and windy Bondi in the eastern suburbs of Sydney is depicted during the record-breaking rainfall on Sunday

The AEMO also pointed out that their fuel mix graph does not contain any electricity “generated by solar panels on the roof” because it “exists behind the meter”.

The NSW government has also reported that the use of solar, wind and bioenergy has more than doubled between 2013 and 2017 from four to nine percent.

Utility companies and large commercial solar energy companies – those of more than 100 kW – have also shown significant growth during that period, according to a report from the state government.

In 2017, major operations generated 400 MW of the state’s solar energy per year.

Fuel mix data shows that the energy consumption of solar energy (shown at two percent at 6:00 pm on Sunday) has risen to a whopping six percent during the record-breaking rainstorm

Fuel mix data shows that the energy consumption of solar energy (shown at two percent at 6:00 pm on Sunday) has risen to a whopping six percent during the record-breaking rainstorm

Fuel mix data shows that the energy consumption of solar energy (shown at two percent at 6:00 pm on Sunday) has risen to a whopping six percent during the record-breaking rainstorm

The total solar growth on all scales has grown nine-fold from 200 MW per year in 2010 to 1800 MW per year in 2017, according to the report.

Solar advocacy body Solar Citizens told Daily Mail Australia in response to the politician’s comments that the Australians were tired of “people like Mark Latham who play small politics with energy.”

‘It is time to continue with the transition to clean, cheap fuel such as wind and solar energy. Millions of Australian households investing in solar panels can’t be wrong, “said national director Ellen Roberts.

‘Renewable energy sources ensure a more stable energy supply during extreme weather conditions.

“Community micro grids, connecting local renewable energy sources, will mean that cities and communities can maintain their electricity supply, even if poles and wires are hit by storms and fires.”

What is solar energy?

There are two methods for generating solar energy.

Photovoltaic solar energy – the kind of solar panel that you might see built into a calculator – are capable of converting light directly into electrical power.

However, in concentrated solar energy systems, mirrors or lenses are first used to capture and focus the sunlight that falls on a large area – it creates heat that can be used to power a steam turbine and generate electricity.

The productivity of solar panels depends on the sunlight they receive at a certain location – a factor that depends on both latitude and climate.

Optimal locations for solar parks include the dry tropics and subtropics, with deserts that lie at such low latitudes, are often clear and receive about 10 hours of sunlight every day.

According to NASA, the eastern part of the Sahara – the Libyan desert – is the sunniest place on earth.

Solar energy accounted for 1.7 percent of worldwide electricity production in 2017 and grows by 35 percent each year.

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