Marine scientists spot the ‘real’ SpongeBob SquarePants and Patrick Star

The ‘real’ SpongeBob SquarePants and Patrick Star! Marine scientists spot a yellow sponge and pink starfish deep beneath the Atlantic waves that look just like the cartoon characters

  • Marine scientists have seen a yellow sea sponge and pink starfish in real life
  • They were found on an underwater mountain 200 miles east of New York City
  • Several impressed Twitter users commented on the photo, with one joking that the pair had “frozen” just before the camera appeared

Since it first aired in 1999, SpongeBob SquarePants has been one of the most popular cartoons around the world.

The Nickelodeon series follows the main character, a yellow sea sponge named SpongeBob and his best friend, a pink starfish named Patrick Star on their adventures around Bikini Bottom.

Now marine scientists have seen a yellow sea sponge and a pink starfish together in real life.

The adorable duo were spotted on the side of an underwater mountain called Retriever Seamount, about 200 miles east of New York City.

Christopher Mah, a scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shared his findings on: Twitter, joking: ‘I normally avoid these refs… but WOW. REAL LIFE SpongeBob and Patrick!’

Marine scientists have spotted a yellow sea sponge and pink starfish in 'real life'.  The adorable duo were spotted on the side of an underwater mountain called Retriever Seamount, about 200 miles east of New York City.

Marine scientists have spotted a yellow sea sponge and pink starfish in ‘real life’. The adorable duo were spotted on the side of an underwater mountain called Retriever Seamount, about 200 miles east of New York City.

The animals were spotted by a remotely operated vehicle (ROVs) dispatched from NOAA’s Okeanos Explorer ship.

Mr. Mah explained that they are a Hertwigia (sponge) and a Chondra star (starfish).

Speak with Insider, he added: ‘I thought it would be funny to make the comparison, which for once was actually a bit similar to the iconic images/colors of the cartoon characters.

The Nickelodeon series follows the main character, a yellow sea sponge named SpongeBob and his best friend, a pink starfish named Patrick Star on their adventures around Bikini Bottom

The Nickelodeon series follows the main character, a yellow sea sponge named SpongeBob and his best friend, a pink starfish named Patrick Star on their adventures around Bikini Bottom

The Nickelodeon series follows the main character, a yellow sea sponge named SpongeBob and his best friend, a pink starfish named Patrick Star on their adventures around Bikini Bottom

“As a biologist specializing in starfish, most of the images of Patrick and Spongebob are wrong.”

Several impressed Twitter users commented on the photo, with one joking that the pair had “frozen” just before the camera appeared.

They wrote, “You just know they were cutting it up right before the camera came… they were like FREEZE.”

Another said: ‘The Netflix adaptation looks great!’

The NOAA’s Okeanos mission has been underway since 2009 with the aim of deepening our understanding of the waters and seafloor off the US coast.

NOAA explained: “The baseline data collected during these missions help close significant gaps in our basic understanding of the US deep waters and seafloor and the resources they contain, and provide information critical to supporting of our nation’s economy, health and safety.’

This is not the first time that a ‘real’ Patrick Star has been spotted in person.

In 2019, a photo of a Patrick Star-esque starfish went viral on Twitter for a rather “brutal” reason.

In the image, the starfish looks like it has a rather peachy bottom, or “thicc a**,” as the photographer describes it.

The photo was posted by Akari on Twitter late last month after spotting the hilarious animal at the Aquarium of the Pacific in California.

Although the starfish looks like it has a human-like ass, this is not the case.

Speaking to USA Today, Nate Jaros, curator of fish and invertebrates at the Aquarium of the Pacific, explained: “Starfish are actually invertebrates or animals without spines and not fish, despite people commonly calling them ‘starfish’.

‘In this photo, the starfish stands on a vertical rock face with two arms holding the rock and two arms hanging in a relaxed position. Starfish sometimes relax their arms, such as when they are eating.

“Because the starfish is oriented vertically, gravity causes the internal components to collapse.”

Starfish or starfish?

Scientists recently made the decision to change the name “starfish” to “starfish” because they aren’t actually fish.

NOAA explains: ‘Starfish live underwater, but that’s where their resemblance to fish ends. They have no gills, scales or fins. Starfish only live in salt water. Seawater, rather than blood, is actually used to pump nutrients through their bodies through a “water circulatory system.”

‘Starfish also move with the help of small tube feet on the underside of their bodies. Adult sunflower starfish can move at an astonishing speed of one meter per minute with 15,000 tube feet. Tube feet also help starfish to hold onto their prey.

Starfish are related to sand dollars, sea urchins and sea cucumbers, all of which are echinoderms, meaning they have a five-point radial symmetry.

‘However, this does not mean that all starfish have five arms and that there are species with 10, 20 or even 40 arms! If one of these arms is lost, a starfish has the amazing ability to regenerate it.”

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