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Maria Menounos, 40, opened up learning that she had a brain tumor while her mother fought stage four brain cancer on Fox News Radio with Brian Kilmeade

Maria Menounos urges the public not to dismiss the symptoms as mere & # 39; work stress & # 39; as she did before her brain tumor diagnosis.

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The 40-year-old Sirius XM host revealed in July 2017 that she had the mass of a golf ball and that she had undergone surgery to remove it.

In a recent appearance Fox News Radio, Menounos said she experienced symptoms such as headache and blurred vision, but she swept them aside – mainly because she channeled all her energy into caring for her mother, who had stage 4 brain cancer.

& # 39; I wasn't listening to my body. Every time my body would scream and make noises, I would be like, "Keep your body closed, I'm busy," she told Brian Kilmeade.

& # 39; I got a headache, my vision became a little blurry … But I swear God let these things happen so that I could see what was happening. & # 39;

Maria Menounos, 40, opened up learning that she had a brain tumor while her mother fought stage four brain cancer on Fox News Radio with Brian Kilmeade

Maria Menounos, 40, opened up learning that she had a brain tumor while her mother fought stage four brain cancer on Fox News Radio with Brian Kilmeade

The 40-year-old Sirius XM host revealed in July 2017 that she had a tumor the size of a golf ball and that she had surgery to remove it. Pictured: Menounos on Fox News Radio
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The 40-year-old Sirius XM host revealed in July 2017 that she had a tumor the size of a golf ball and that she had surgery to remove it. Pictured: Menounos on Fox News Radio

She admitted that she ignored symptoms such as headache and blurred vision because she was so busy. Pictured: Menounos on Fox News Radio

She admitted that she ignored symptoms such as headache and blurred vision because she was so busy. Pictured: Menounos on Fox News Radio

The 40-year-old Sirius XM host revealed in July 2017 that she had a tumor the size of a golf ball and that she had surgery to remove it. But she admitted that she ignored symptoms such as headache and blurred vision because she was so busy. Pictured, left and right: Menounos on Fox News Radio

Menounos told Fox News Radio that she had so many responsibilities that she didn't have time to let herself be sorted out.

& # 39; I was doing a million things … and besides, I am a woman, so my hair must be perfect, and my nails must be perfect, and I must send the flowers, and I must plan the vacations and I have to do everything because all the women who listen to this know it, & she said.

Menounos said she went to a doctor at the UCLA Medical Center in February 2017 and told him that because she was experiencing ear pain, she thought she had an ear infection.

Unconvinced, he asked her if she had any other symptoms.

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& # 39; When I listed the symptoms, I said, "Oh my god, I think I have a brain tumor like my mother, but I know you're going to think I'm crazy", & # 39; she said.

& # 39; And he says, "No, let's get an MRI and check." And then, see, I had it. & # 39;

Menounos, a former host of E! News, was diagnosed with meningioma, which is a tumor of the meninges, which is the tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord.

However, it is classified as a brain tumor because it puts pressure on the nerves of the brain. The tumor generally forms in the head and about 85 percent of the cases are benign.

Because the tumors grow slowly, a patient can live for years with a meningioma before it is noticed.

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Symptoms are usually blurred vision, painful headache, hearing loss, memory loss and loss of smell.

If the tumor is asymptomatic, doctors can do that recommended regular monitoring with brain scans.

However, if the tumor grows or symptoms begin to develop, patients must undergo surgery to remove all or most of the mass.

If the tumor is cancerous, radiation can be used to kill cancer cells or on parts of the mass that the surgeon could not remove.

Menounos' mother, Litsa, has been fighting stage four brain cancer since August 2016, particularly a rare and aggressive cancer known as glioblastoma. Pictured: Menounos, on the right, with her mother

Menounos' mother, Litsa, has been fighting stage four brain cancer since August 2016, particularly a rare and aggressive cancer known as glioblastoma. Pictured: Menounos, on the right, with her mother

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Menounos' mother, Litsa, has been fighting stage four brain cancer since August 2016, particularly a rare and aggressive cancer known as glioblastoma. Pictured: Menounos, on the right, with her mother

The former E! The news host tumor is called a meningioma and is a lump of the meninges, the tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord

The former E! The news host tumor is called a meningioma and is a lump of the meninges, the tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord

The former E! The news host tumor is called a meningioma and is a lump of the meninges, the tissue that surrounds the brain and spinal cord

Meanwhile, Menounos & # 39; mother Litsa has been fighting since August 2016 with stage 4 brain cancer, especially glioblastoma.

Also known as Glioblastoma Multiforme, this is a rare, aggressive form of brain tumor that is found in the brain or in the spinal cord.

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They form star-shaped cells in the brain that are known as astrocytes and that make their own blood supply, allowing them to grow quickly.

Symptoms include constant painful headache, vomiting, seizures, double vision, and difficulty speaking.

According to the American Brain Tumor Association, around 14,000 new cases are diagnosed each year.

Treatment options to slow and control tumor growth include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation – but the cancer usually comes back.

The tumors are grade IV, the most deadly form, and the survival rate after five years is only five percent.

Menounos said she didn't want to burden her parents with her diagnosis, so she kept it a secret. She didn't tell until two days before her surgery.

Menounos said she didn't want to burden her parents with her diagnosis, so she told them only two days before her surgery. Pictured: Menounos, on the right, with her mother during the broadcast of Stand Up To Cancer in September 2018

Menounos said she didn't want to burden her parents with her diagnosis, so she told them only two days before her surgery. Pictured: Menounos, on the right, with her mother during the broadcast of Stand Up To Cancer in September 2018

Menounos said she didn't want to burden her parents with her diagnosis, so she told them only two days before her surgery. Pictured: Menounos, on the right, with her mother during the broadcast of Stand Up To Cancer in September 2018

She recently announced on social media that her mother's tumor has shrunk considerably, Pictured: Menounos in April 2019

She recently announced on social media that her mother's tumor has shrunk considerably, Pictured: Menounos in April 2019

She added that her mother's cognitive function has decreased from treatments. Pictured: Menounos in February 2019

She added that her mother's cognitive function has decreased from treatments. Pictured: Menounos in February 2019

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She recently revealed on social media that, although her mother's tumor has shrunk considerably, her cognitive function has declined from treatments. Pictured: menounos in April 2019, left and in February 2019, right

& # 39; At that time we had heard that my mother's tumor was growing and it was really a dangerous time and really scary, & # 39; said Menounos.

& # 39; My mother was diagnosed in August almost three years ago and about eight months later I was diagnosed and so we both had brain surgery within one year of each other, within the same year. & # 39;

She recently revealed on social media that, although her mother's tumor has shrunk considerably, her cognitive function has declined from treatments.

& # 39; My mother is a miracle … but cognitively she has a lot of damage, & # 39; Menounos said in an Instagram story, according to the Boston Herald.

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& # 39; She's not my mother anymore and I don't know how to explain it differently. Sometimes she doesn't know what's going on, she can't remember anything, sometimes she does crazy things. & # 39;

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