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Marble head believed to be the missing piece a 2,000-year-old headless statue of Hercules

The 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck off the coast of Antikythera, a Greek island with the oldest known analog computer, has recently shared more treasures with the world.

A larger-than-life marble head of a bearded man has recently been recovered from the depths and archaeologists believe it could be the missing piece from the headless statue of ‘Hercules of Antikythera’.

The statue, which was found in 1901, is in the National Archaeological Museum in Greece.

Two human teeth were also found in the sunken ship, which will be analyzed to hopefully reveal the individuals they belonged to.

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The 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck off the coast of Antikythera, a Greek island home to the oldest known analog computer, has recently shared more treasures with the world

The 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck off the coast of Antikythera, a Greek island home to the oldest known analog computer, has recently shared more treasures with the world

“Important information is expected to be extracted from two human teeth, discovered in a solid agglomerate of marine deposits along with fragments of copper, wood and other materials typical of a maritime disaster,” said the team, led by the Hellenic Ephorate. of Underwater Antiquities, said in the blog post

“Genetic and isotope analysis of the teeth may be useful to derive information about the genome and other features relevant to the origin of the individuals to which they belonged.”

The team also collected sediment samples from the ship’s final resting place, allowing for a microanalysis that will lead to a better understanding of the shipwreck’s dimensions and precise position.

“Along with the ongoing analysis of artifacts, the newly applicable micro-arachaeological practices will enhance the ability to accurately reconstruct the wreck’s disposition and the conditions of the ship’s sinking sometime in the first half of the 1st century BC, ‘ the team shared in the post.

A larger-than-life marble head of a bearded man was recently recovered from the depths

A larger-than-life marble head of a bearded man was recently recovered from the depths

The marble head is so massive that the team had to tie it up to bring it to the surface

The marble head is so massive that the team had to tie it up to bring it to the surface

In 1901, divers searching for sponges off the coast of Antikythera, a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, stumbled upon a Roman-era shipwreck that contained the highly sophisticated astronomical calculator, or the oldest known analog computer.

The Antikythera Mechanism has captivated the scientific community and the world with wonder ever since, as well as sparking a more than century-long investigation into how an ancient civilization created such an incredible device.

The highly complex mechanism, consisting of up to 40 bronze gears and gears, was used in ancient times to track the cycles of the solar system.

The scans also revealed that the mechanism was originally housed in a rectangular wooden frame with two doors, covered with instructions on how to use it.

On the front was a single dial with the Greek zodiac and an Egyptian calendar.

Archaeologists say it may be the missing piece from the headless statue of 'Hercules of Antikythera'.

Archaeologists say it may be the missing piece from the headless statue of ‘Hercules of Antikythera’.

The marble head had deteriorated over the years, but experts hope to conduct a deeper analysis to prove it is the missing head of the Hercules statue

The marble head had deteriorated over the years, but experts hope to conduct a deeper analysis to prove it is the missing head of the Hercules statue

The mechanism (pictured) was found in a Roman freighter off the coast of the Greek island of Antikythera

The mechanism (pictured) was found in a Roman freighter off the coast of the Greek island of Antikythera

On the back were two more dials with information about lunar cycles and eclipses. The calculator would have been powered by a hand crank.

The device was able to track the movements of Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn — the only planets known at the time, the position of the sun, and the moon’s location and phases.

The researchers were able to read all the month names on a 19-year calendar on the back of the mechanism.

Scientists have suggested the mechanism could be somehow related to Archimedes, after an investigation found that language was engraved on the device.

The inscriptions suggested it was made in Corinth or Syracuse, where Archimedes lived.

But Archimedes was killed in 212 BC, while the ship carrying the device is said to have sunk between 85 and 60 BC.

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