Manchester United: Brandon Williams fined for failing to provide police with information on speeding offenses

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Man United’s Brandon Williams is fined £ 1,000 for ignoring police letters after his father was caught speeding in the £ 40,000 Mercedes he bought for him … and even the famous lawyer named ‘Mr Loophole’ can not saving the ‘naive’ defender from financial penalty

  • Brandon Williams has been fined £ 1,000 for failing to report a speeding offense
  • The Manchester United defender appeared in court on the charge
  • A car registered at Williams’ address was caught speeding on a road in North Wales
  • The player’s father, Paul, admitted to being the driver and filled out a police form

Manchester United defender Brandon Williams has been slapped with a £ 1,000 fine for ignoring police over a speeding ticket in Wales – but avoided further punishment thanks to famed lawyer known as’ Mr. Loophole ‘.

The 20-year-old was represented at the Mold Magistrates Court on Thursday by famed lawyer Nick Freeman after a £ 40,000 Mercedes registered to the player’s name was caught speeding on a road in North Wales.

The court was told that the police had sent a form to Williams, who registered the luxury car at an address in Manchester, which was completed by his father Paul after admitting he was the driver caught speeding. the A55 in Rhaullt Hill.

The prosecution then said a response had been sent directly to Williams, but he failed.

Williams, who earns £ 40,000 a week at United, argued that his father is the person handling his mail and he never responded to the second letter from the police.

Manchester United defender Brandon Williams (pictured right in 2020) has been slapped with £ 1,000 fine for ignoring police over speeding offense committed by father Paul (left)

Manchester United defender Brandon Williams (pictured right in 2020) has been slapped with £ 1,000 fine for ignoring police over speeding offense committed by father Paul (left)

The £ 40,000 Mercedes (pictured), which Williams bought as a 50th birthday present for his father, was being driven by Paul Williams when he was clocked for speeding.

The £ 40,000 Mercedes (pictured), which Williams bought as a 50th birthday present for his father, was being driven by Paul Williams when he was clocked for speeding.

The £ 40,000 Mercedes (pictured), which Williams bought as a 50th birthday present for his father, was being driven by Paul Williams when he was clocked for speeding.

Despite this, Williams was found guilty of failing to provide information and was fined £ 1,000 and sentenced to £ 720 in costs.

While the England Under 21 international was found guilty, famed lawyer Freeman successfully argued that no points should be imposed on the player’s license.

The fullback claimed he focused solely on his football and that his father, who was clocked at an average speed of 85 mph in a zone of 70 in North Wales, was handling his mail.

The Mercedes, which Williams bought as a 50th birthday present for his father, never ran through the left back and stayed at the Lowry Hotel in Manchester at the time of the incident.

Williams said it was “not reasonably feasible” for him to provide the information since his father had intercepted the message.

“The defendant is the innocent victim here. He has nothing to gain, ”Mr. Freeman insisted.

Williams was staying at the Lowry Hotel with his United teammates at the time of the offense

Williams was staying at the Lowry Hotel with his United teammates at the time of the offense

Williams was staying at the Lowry Hotel with his United teammates at the time of the offense

Magistrates chairman Andrew Stubbs, however, refused to let the player run free and fined him.

Stubbs believed there were “significant extenuating circumstances” in the case and that Williams had been naive.

Mr. Freeman said out of court on Thursday: “This was a technical offense in every way and the magistrates had great sympathy for Brandon’s plight.

Section 172 was completed by his father without Brandon’s knowledge to fairly reflect the speeding offense his father committed. It was unusual for the magistrates to refuse to impose a mandatory six-point penalty, reflecting their sympathy with the circumstances.

“This case highlights the need for registered holders to ensure that they complete the communications themselves and that no one else completes the form on their behalf.”

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