Man whose American wife died serving in the fight returns to the US after the illegal deportation of ICE

Deported Mexican widower, whose American wife died in Afghanistan, may return to the US after ICE ignored a judicial order and threw it out

  • Immigration kicked José Arturo González Carranza from the US on April 10, despite a 2018 court order that allowed him to stay in the United States
  • The 30-year-old Mexican returned to Phoenix on Monday afternoon
  • González Carranza was married to Barbara Vieyra, who died during a combat mission in 2010 when he served for the US Army in Afghanistan
  • ICE arrested him in 2017 but an immigration judge dismissed the deportation case a year later
  • He was then admitted to the Parool in Place program that allows undocumented family members of military personnel to remain on the other side
  • ICE deported him after missing a judicial appointment, but González Carranza claims that he never received the notice to appear

The deported husband of an American veteran who died in Afghanistan was allowed to return from Mexico on Monday after ICE kicked him out of the country.

José Arturo González Carranza, 30, was arrested at gunpoint by immigration agency agents while driving to his welding job in Phoenix on April 8.

The Mexican citizen, whose 22-year-old American wife Barbara Vieyra was killed by insurgents during a 2010 US uprising during an uprising in the US Army, was told he would be deported on Wednesday.

Immigration officials, however, allowed him to re-enter Monday after public outrage.

José Arturo González Carranza was arrested by ICE on April 8 and deported two days later despite judgment of a judge who had canceled an expulsion from 2018

José Arturo González Carranza was arrested by ICE on April 8 and deported two days later despite judgment of a judge who had canceled an expulsion from 2018

Barbara Vieyra died during a combat mission in 2010 while serving for the US Army in Afghanistan. She was married to José Arturo González Carranza, who is involved in a lawsuit with ICE after the agency overlooked the decision of a judge and expelled him from the US.

Barbara Vieyra died during a combat mission in 2010 while serving for the US Army in Afghanistan. She was married to José Arturo González Carranza, who is involved in a lawsuit with ICE after the agency overlooked the decision of a judge and expelled him from the US.

Barbara Vieyra died during a combat mission in 2010 while serving for the US Army in Afghanistan. She was married to José Arturo González Carranza, who is involved in a lawsuit with ICE after the agency overlooked the decision of a judge and expelled him from the US.

US Army soldier Barbara Vieyra died on September 18, 2010, the same day her husband celebrated his birthday

US Army soldier Barbara Vieyra died on September 18, 2010, the same day her husband celebrated his birthday

US Army soldier Barbara Vieyra died on September 18, 2010, the same day her husband celebrated his birthday

He told the Republic of Arizona that he crossed the US illegally in 2004 and married Vieyra three years later. However, he failed to file a petition for a permanent residence permit or a green card before his wife died.

Immigration officials started deportation proceedings against him in 2017, but a judge granted his right to hold the parole in place [PIP] program available to some undocumented family members of active or retired US soldiers.

Later that year, ICE González Carranza issued a Notice to Appear in which the widower was to appear in court in December. He says that he did not receive the warning, which forced another judge to order his deportation last week.

It is unclear why ICE reversed their decision, but the news about the deportation led to a major public setback on social media.

Shortly before he returned, González Carranza destroyed immigration officials because they had overlooked the original sentence that allowed him to stay.

& # 39; The judge gave me the opportunity to obtain my legal documents so that I could stay the country & # 39 ;, he told Univision.

& # 39; I never thought they never cared about a court ruling. They did what they wanted to do. & # 39;

Gonzalez Carranza has a 12-year-old daughter from his marriage to Vieyra, who lives with her grandparents.

González Carranza (photo) was allowed to return to the United States on Monday afternoon

González Carranza (photo) was allowed to return to the United States on Monday afternoon

González Carranza (photo) was allowed to return to the United States on Monday afternoon

While living in Mexico in half a house in Nogales, Sonora, he wasn't sure when he would see his daughter again.

& # 39; Whether it was a mistake, we'll never know & # 39 ;, said Ezequiel Hernández, González Carranza's immigration lawyer, to NBC affiliated with KPNX.

José Arturo González Carranza (left) married the American soldier Barbara Vieyra, but the couple never applied for his permanent residence permit

José Arturo González Carranza (left) married the American soldier Barbara Vieyra, but the couple never applied for his permanent residence permit

José Arturo González Carranza (left) married the American soldier Barbara Vieyra, but the couple never applied for his permanent residence permit

& # 39; But I think the second notification to the court was a mistake. & # 39;

González Carranza and his lawyer will now insist on the termination of future deportation procedures.

& # 39; I think her death wasn't worth defending this country & # 39 ;, he said about his wife. & # 39; President Trump would strongly support the soldiers. & # 39;

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