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Max Manikhouth, 34, a former Dallas machine operator, lost Cindy, 32, on July 15, 2018, leaving their children Bree, seven, Neeci, three, and Cindy & 12-year-old son from an earlier relationship without a mother

A devastated man told how he tragically lost his wife, just a week after she placed a contraceptive coil.

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Max Manikhouth, 34, a former Dallas machine operator, lost Cindy on July 32, 2018, leaving their children Bree, seven, Neeci, three, and Cindy's 12-year-old son from an earlier relationship without a mother.

Shockingly, Cindy had contracted an irreversible infection in her contraceptive coil, causing toxic shock syndrome – a rare but life-threatening condition caused by bacteria that invade the body and release harmful toxins, according to the NHS.

Max claims that Cindy went to get the coil – a small T-shaped contraceptive in the womb of a woman – just a week before she died.

Max Manikhouth, 34, a former Dallas machine operator, lost Cindy, 32, on July 15, 2018, leaving their children Bree, seven, Neeci, three, and Cindy & 12-year-old son from an earlier relationship without a mother

Max Manikhouth, 34, a former Dallas machine operator, lost Cindy, 32, on July 15, 2018, leaving their children Bree, seven, Neeci, three, and Cindy & 12-year-old son from an earlier relationship without a mother

Shockingly, Cindy had contracted an irreversible infection in her contraceptive coil, causing toxic shock syndrome - a rare but life-threatening condition caused by bacteria that invade the body and release harmful toxins, according to the NHS

Shockingly, Cindy had contracted an irreversible infection in her contraceptive coil, causing toxic shock syndrome - a rare but life-threatening condition caused by bacteria that invade the body and release harmful toxins, according to the NHS

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Shockingly, Cindy had contracted an irreversible infection in her contraceptive coil, causing toxic shock syndrome – a rare but life-threatening condition caused by bacteria that invade the body and release harmful toxins, according to the NHS

Max said: & # 39; A few days after Cindy got the IUD, she was nauseous, had diarrhea and cramps – which we thought was normal in the beginning.

& # 39; However, she started showing signs of fever, so she called a doctor and explained her symptoms, but was told that everything she experienced was not uncommon. & # 39;

Max also claims that Cindy, who was a distributor of supplies for a children's hospital, was told by the doctor to use Advil – a type of Ibuprofen – for two days, which had no effect on her condition.

As her symptoms worsened, Max decided to take Cindy to the emergency room.

Max claims that Cindy went to get the coil - a small T-shaped contraceptive in the womb of a woman - just a week before she died

Max claims that Cindy went to get the coil - a small T-shaped contraceptive in the womb of a woman - just a week before she died

Max claims that Cindy went to get the coil – a small T-shaped contraceptive in the womb of a woman – just a week before she died

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He described her condition: & I realized when she left the bedroom after taking Advil twice that she was so pale – she looked like a zombie.

& # 39; I took her to the ER myself and saw the doctors and nurses giving her antibiotics, performing dialysis and other transfusions – her kidneys were already defective.

& # 39; It didn't look good and the doctor told me she only had a few hours left and that her chances of resuscitation were low. & # 39;

Tragically, Cindy died that day.

Max also claims that Cindy, previously seen on vacation, who was a distributor of supplies for a children's hospital, was told by the doctor to take Advil - a type of Ibuprofen - for two days, which had no effect on her condition

Max also claims that Cindy, previously seen on vacation, who was a distributor of supplies for a children's hospital, was told by the doctor to take Advil - a type of Ibuprofen - for two days, which had no effect on her condition

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Max also claims that Cindy, previously seen on vacation, who was a distributor of supplies for a children's hospital, was told by the doctor to take Advil – a type of Ibuprofen – for two days, which had no effect on her condition

Max had to ask another family member to bring his children, Bree, seven, Neeci, three and the 12-year-old son of Cindy from an earlier relationship to say goodbye, seen earlier

Max had to ask another family member to bring his children, Bree, seven, Neeci, three and the 12-year-old son of Cindy from an earlier relationship to say goodbye, seen earlier

Max had to ask another family member to bring his children, Bree, seven, Neeci, three and the 12-year-old son of Cindy from an earlier relationship to say goodbye, seen earlier

Max had to ask another family member to take his children, Bree, seven, Neeci, three and Cindy's 12-year-old son from an earlier relationship to say goodbye.

Max, who was previously a machine operator in a warehouse, but has not worked since Cindy's death, was married to Cindy two years earlier in 2016 after he introduced him to a flash mob.

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The couple married in a courthouse, but was planning to later & # 39; really & # 39; to hold a marriage.

The sweethearts from childhood met when they were only 16, but lost contact until they were reunited at a friend's party when Max was 25.

Max, who was previously a machine operator in a warehouse, but has not worked since Cindy's death, was married to Cindy two years earlier in 2016 after he introduced him to a flash mob

Max, who was previously a machine operator in a warehouse, but has not worked since Cindy's death, was married to Cindy two years earlier in 2016 after he introduced him to a flash mob

Max, who was previously a machine operator in a warehouse, but has not worked since Cindy's death, was married to Cindy two years earlier in 2016 after he introduced him to a flash mob

Max is seen with their daughters, their children Bree, seven, Neeci, three, who now know that their children are in heaven

Max is seen with their daughters, their children Bree, seven, Neeci, three, who now know that their children are in heaven

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Max is seen with their daughters, their children Bree, seven, Neeci, three, who now know that their children are in heaven

Max said: & # 39; We had our ups and downs, but we stayed together because we loved each other very much.

& # 39; She was a wonderful mother and incredible. Unfortunately, all children now know that Mom is in heaven.

& # 39; Life is very different now – humiliating, but different. & # 39;

Although the infection in Cindy & # 39; s IUD that led to the TSS is not confirmed, Max wants to draw attention to the toxic shock syndrome after the tragic incident.

& # 39; I want people to go to the hospital if they have a fever or suspect something is wrong, & # 39; he explained.

& # 39; Life is short and tomorrow is never promised, and this can happen to any woman.

& # 39; Even the most regular, everyday working mother who took care of her children and family lost her life. & # 39;

The couple, seen with Bree when Cindy was pregnant, married in a courthouse but planned to later become a & # 39; real & # 39; to hold a wedding

The couple, seen with Bree when Cindy was pregnant, married in a courthouse but planned to later become a & # 39; real & # 39; to hold a wedding

The couple, seen with Bree when Cindy was pregnant, married in a courthouse but planned to later become a & # 39; real & # 39; to hold a wedding

The youth favorites, seen in 2017, met when they were only 16, but unfortunately lost contact until they were reunited at a friend's party when Max was 25
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The youth favorites, seen in 2017, met when they were only 16, but unfortunately lost contact until they were reunited at a friend's party when Max was 25

The youth favorites, seen in 2017, met when they were only 16, but unfortunately lost contact until they were reunited at a friend's party when Max was 25

Although it is not confirmed what caused the infection in Cindy & # 39; s IUD, after the tragic incident, Max wants to draw attention to the toxic shock syndrome. Cindy is seen with her daughter

Although it is not confirmed what caused the infection in Cindy & # 39; s IUD, after the tragic incident, Max wants to draw attention to the toxic shock syndrome. Cindy is seen with her daughter

Although it is not confirmed what caused the infection in Cindy & # 39; s IUD, after the tragic incident, Max wants to draw attention to the toxic shock syndrome. Cindy is seen with her daughter

WHAT IS TOXIC SHOCK SYNDROME?

Toxic shock syndrome is a very dangerous bacterial infection – but it can get an incorrect diagnosis because the symptoms are similar to other diseases and because it is so rare.

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It occurs when usually harmless Staphylococcus aureus or Streptococcus bacteria, which live on the skin, penetrate the bloodstream and release dangerous toxins.

The prevalence of TSS is unclear, but doctors have claimed that it affects approximately one or two in every 100,000 women.

It has a death rate of five to 15 percent. And comes back in 30 to 40 percent of the cases.

Symptoms usually start with a sudden high fever – a temperature above 38.9 ° C / 102 ° F.

Within a few hours, a patient develops flu-like symptoms, including headache, muscle aches, sore throat, and cough.

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Nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, feeling weak, dizziness and confusion are also symptoms.

Women are most at risk of getting toxic shock syndrome during menstruation and especially if they are using tampons, have recently given birth or are using an internal barrier contraceptive, such as a diaphragm.

Although tampon boxes recommend changing them between four and eight o'clock, it is common for women to forget them and leave them overnight.

Treatment may include antibiotics to help fight the infection, oxygen to help with breathing, fluids to prevent dehydration and damage to organs, and medicines to control blood pressure.

Dialysis may also be necessary if the kidneys no longer work.

In severe cases, surgery may be required to remove dead tissue. In rare cases it may be necessary to amputate the affected area.

To prevent TSS, women should use tampons with the lowest absorbency for their flow, alternating a tampon and a sanitary napkin and washing their hands before and after insertion.

Tampons must also be replaced regularly, as indicated on the package – usually every four to eight hours.

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