Man imprisoned for 12 years for trying to use Bitcoin to buy chemical weapon after messy breakup

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A former Missouri teacher has been sentenced to 12 years in prison for attempting to purchase a deadly chemical weapon on the dark web as part of a plot to kill a woman who broke up.

Jason Siesser, 46, of Columbia, got his sentence in Jefferson City federal court on Tuesday, prosecutors said in a press release.

In August, Siesser pleaded guilty to one attempt to obtain a chemical weapon and one time to aggravated identity theft.

Former Missouri teacher Jason Siesser, 48, was sentenced to 12 years in prison after pleading guilty to attempting to obtain a chemical weapon and aggravating identity theft

Former Missouri teacher Jason Siesser, 48, was sentenced to 12 years in prison after pleading guilty to attempting to obtain a chemical weapon and aggravated identity theft

Researchers said Siesser tried twice in 2018 to buy chemical dimethylmercury, which can kill hundreds, using Bitcoin on the dark web.

Siesser said to the seller, “I plan to use it shortly after receipt.”

He is accused of placing the order in the name of a young person in his care without permission, but authorities said he was the person who accepted the package he believed contained the chemical when it was delivered.

Authorities said the amount Siesser was looking for would have been enough to kill as many as 300 people.

Law enforcement officers executed a search warrant after delivery of the package, which contained a harmless inert substance.

Investigators found the package on a shelf in Siesser’s garage, as well as previously shipped packages containing the toxin cadmium arsenide, a poisonous substance that can be deadly if swallowed or inhaled; cadmium metal and hydrochloric acid.

Siesser lived and worked in this youth group home in Columbia, Missouri, using a young person's identity to order the deadly chemical

Siesser lived and worked in this youth group home in Columbia, Missouri, using a young person's identity to order the deadly chemical

Siesser lived and worked in this youth group home in Columbia, Missouri, using a young person’s identity to order the deadly chemical

A search of Siesser’s house had resulted in writings prosecuting for his heartbreak, anger and resentment over a breakup, and a longing for the person who caused the grief to die.

“They say I should let it go, but my hatred is just too strong,” Siesser wrote, according to an affidavit. “Letting go of anger is the right thing, but I feel so strong I dream about your ending. You burn in flames. You choke on your own blood. Your soul is completely empty. ‘

In another note, he wrote in part: “Our early ending was all wrong. You threw me out like garbage, but look how I got strong … The darkness that consumes me will one day overflow. You were there to teach me something I already knew. Now it’s my turn to teach you a lesson full of pain. Your life has been forfeited, washed away. ‘

According to the prosecuting documents, Siesser had two relationships with women that left him heartbroken.

Siesser was married to a woman and lived with her in the Netherlands until 2012. After years of separation, Siesser and his wife divorced in 2017 when he met another woman in Columbia, Missouri.

When federal agents raided Sister's home, they found writings expressing heartbreak, anger, and resentment over a breakup

When federal agents raided Sister's home, they found writings expressing heartbreak, anger, and resentment over a breakup

When federal agents raided Sister’s home, they found writings expressing heartbreak, anger, and resentment over a breakup

Although they only had three dates, Siesser felt a strong connection with his new girlfriend, and when she ended the relationship with him suddenly, Siesser was depressed for six months and sought advice.

The affidavit states that Siesser wrote fictional stories about men seeking revenge on ex-girlfriends. In one story, a man used a fertilizer spreader to string a woman’s garden with asbestos, which ultimately killed her decades later. In another story, a man locked a woman in scuba gear in a submerged box so that she would die if her oxygen tank was empty.

The youngster, whose name Siesser used to buy the toxic chemicals, revealed in an interview with federal agents that the man had told him he wanted to “ become a hitman and kill those who wronged him in the past, ” including his ex-wife. . and others.’

Prosecutors had previously said they did not believe a public attack was planned.

Siesser’s attorney told the New York Times that the 48-year-old, a former teacher and had served in the military, struggled with mental health issues and expressed regret.

A LinkedIn page associated with Siesser revealed that he served in the US military for four years, later worked in customer support in the Netherlands, and recently taught social studies at a high school in Higbee, Missouri.