Man finds 2.2-carat diamond in state park while searching for gemstone to propose to girlfriend

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After three days of digging into the earth for something sparkly, a 26-year-old man was rewarded with a beautiful find: a glittering 2.2-carat triangular yellow diamond.

Christian Liden came across the beautiful rock in Arkansas’s Crater of Diamonds State Park on May 10 while foraging the Earth with a friend.

“I was shaking so bad, I asked my buddy to get him out of the gravel for me!” Liden said of the moment he recognized his impressive find.

The Washington resident told park officials he made the 2,000-mile road trip in search of a rock he could use to propose to his girlfriend Desirae, whom he’s had for two years.

Christian Liden, 26, shows off the stunning After spending a few days digging into the earth for something sparkly, 26-year-old Christian was rewarded with a stunning find: a glittering, triangular-shaped 2.2-carat yellow diamond.

Christian Liden, 26, shows off the incredible 2.2-carat yellow diamond he unearthed at the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas

The 2.2-carat, triangular yellow diamond is just one of 121 registered in the park this year

The 2.2-carat, triangular yellow diamond is just one of 121 registered in the park this year

During a walk in the woods, Liden took out the diamond in the rough and asked Desirae.  in marriage

During a walk in the woods, Liden took out the diamond in the rough and asked Desirae. in marriage

Liden had already stocked enough gold after scouring his home state for five years, but his latest excursion led him to his biggest discovery yet.

‘I never expected anything like this. I was just hoping to find one—just a small one—so I could put it on the ring and say, “Hey, I dug that diamond out,” Liden said. CNN.

A two-carat diamond can be worth anywhere from $8,500 to $59,000, according to diamonds.pro.

Waymon Cox, a park interpreter at the Crater of Diamonds, says it’s impossible to know the diamond’s market value until it’s appraised by a certified gemologist, who considers its quality based on the four C’s: color, carat, clarity and cut shape.

Although Liden has been mining his own rocks for years, it wasn’t until a colleague told him about the Arkansas park that he decided to check it out for himself.

“I was shaking so bad, I asked my buddy to get him out of the gravel for me!” member said:

Like any responsible tourist, he began his research online, watching videos of others excavating their own gems on the site.

He built his own mining equipment while his now fiancé was at work. He then had to come up with a ruse after his friend Josh agreed to take the trip with him.

“She knew I was going on a road trip, but she didn’t know what we were doing. I told her we were going to visit some state parks and some national parks, but other than that she didn’t know we would find gems,” Liden said.

They left Washington on May 1, dug up some sapphires in Yellowstone National Park along the way, and reached the Crater of Diamonds on May 7.

The state bought the park from General Earth Minerals in 1972 for $750,000, according to the park website. It features a 37.5-acre diamond mining area where visitors regularly find jewels.

So far this year, 121 diamonds weighing more than 20 carats have been registered in the park.

Liden proposed to his girlfriend during a walk in the woods the day after he returned, although he gave her another ring while they let the diamond form into a ring.

Liden proposed to his girlfriend during a walk in the woods the day after he returned, although he gave her another ring while they let the diamond form into a ring.

Park Assistant Superintendent Dru Edmonds called Liden’s find “one-of-a-kind.”

“As beautiful as this diamond is, I think the best part is the story behind it,” Edmonds said. “Since eighth grade, Mr. Liden has dreamed of making a special ring for his wife-to-be with stones and gold that he won himself. And now he can make that dream come true!’

Liden proposed to his girlfriend during a walk in the woods the day after he returned, although he gave her another ring while they let the diamond form into a ring.

“After she said yes, I pulled the ring out, gave it to her and told her this is only temporary while we find someone who can design a ring around this,” he said. Today.

Entry to the Crater of Diamonds State Park costs $10 and places are limited to 1,500 per day.

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