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Man demands trial by battle with Japanese swords in battle against ex-wife

Man demands trial by fight with Japanese swords in fight against ex-wife – but asks the judge for 12 weeks lead time so that he can forge or buy the metal

  • Man in court case with ex-wife requested trial by fight with Japanese swords
  • He asked the court to allow him 12 weeks to find or fake the katana swords
  • He pointed out that dueling had been used “as recently as 1818 for the British court”

A man locked up in a lawsuit with his former wife has requested a trial by fighting Japanese swords to resolve the dispute.

David Ostrom, 40, from Paola, Kansas, said he would give his ex-wife Bridgette Ostrom, 38, the choice of a lawyer or a “stand-in-hunter” to fight him.

He argued in legal documents that dueling was never “explicitly prohibited or restricted” in the United States.

He pointed out to the Iowa District Court in Shelby County that the method was “only used in British Court in 1818”.

David Ostrom, 40, has requested a trial through battles with Japanese swords. He pointed out to the Iowa District Court in Shelby County that the 'British Court' method was not used until 1818 (stock image)

David Ostrom, 40, has requested a trial through battles with Japanese swords. He pointed out to the Iowa District Court in Shelby County that the ‘British Court’ method was not used until 1818 (stock image)

Ostrom told the Des Moines Register that his inspiration came from a 2016 case in which New York Supreme Court Justice Philip Minardo admitted that duels had not been abolished.

In the documents, Ostrom expressed the desire to meet his ex-wife and her lawyer “on the battlefield where (he) will get their soul out of their bodies.”

He added that his wife, from Harlan, “had legally destroyed him.”

He asked the Iowa District Court to give him 12 weeks ‘lead time’ so that he could find or forge katana and wakizashi swords.

Iowa District Court in Shelby County. The court has yet to decide on the motion of both parties

Iowa District Court in Shelby County. The court has yet to decide on the motion of both parties

Iowa District Court in Shelby County. The court has yet to decide on the motion of both parties

The lawyer of his former wife, Matthew Hudson, opposed the request, pointing out that Mr. Ostrom had spelled incorrectly “physically” and added: “Although (Ostrom) and potential fighters have souls to be let, they ask respectfully not let the court do this. ”

Hudson argued that a duel could lead to the death of one or both parties, which would be disproportionate to issues of custody and property taxes.

He asked the court to order Ostrom to undergo psychological treatment.

In response, Ostrom admitted the spelling error, but denied psychological problems.

The Iowa court has yet to decide on the motion of both parties.

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