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Raymond Lazarine, 67, admits that he killed his wife, but claims that he cannot be held fully responsible for her murder because he was sleepwalking at the time

Raymond Lazarine, 67, admits that he killed his wife, but claims that he cannot be held fully responsible for her murder because he was sleepwalking at the time

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Raymond Lazarine, 67, admits that he killed his wife, but claims that he cannot be held fully responsible for her murder because he was sleepwalking at the time

A man from Houston admitting that he killed his wife claims that he cannot be held fully responsible for her death because he was sleepwalking at the time of the murder, a court heard Tuesday.

Raymond Lazarine, 67, was charged with murder in the death of his wife, Deborah Lazarine, 63, on December 18, 2013, after having shot her six times in their home in Dillon, including twice in the head and once in the back .

Shortly after the fatal shooting Lazarine called his son, Nathan, just before noon to tell him he dreamed he had killed Deborah, but woke up to find her lifeless in a pool of blood on the floor, lawyers claimed.

Lazarine later repeated to the police that he thought he was in a dream while he executed the murder. Because of his apparent sleepy condition, Lazarine claims that his actions were involuntary.

& # 39; Our position here is that this was a dream and not voluntary. And he does, we had him evaluated, and of course the experts come along to say, hey, we think he is suffering from a medical condition in which it is involuntary, & # 39; said Lazarine & # 39; s lawyer Feroz F Merchant against the jury yesterday.

Deborah Lazarine, 63, was killed on December 18, 2013, after her husband shot her six times in their home in Dillon
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Deborah Lazarine, 63, was killed on December 18, 2013, after her husband shot her six times in their home in Dillon

Deborah Lazarine, 63, was killed on December 18, 2013, after her husband shot her six times in their home in Dillon

A diagram shows the six bullet wounds that Deborah suffered, including two in the head and one in the back

A diagram shows the six bullet wounds that Deborah suffered, including two in the head and one in the back

A diagram shows the six bullet wounds that Deborah suffered, including two in the head and one in the back

Fil Waters, a now retired murder investigator in Houston, who was one of the first to arrive at the scene of the crime, revealed to the court what Lazarine first told him.

& # 39; He mentioned something there that was previously a ready-made comment about: & # 39; This is like a dream. I wish I could wake up. & # 39; Something like that, & he said.

Prosecutors called 46-year-old Krysta Johns – the daughter of Deborah and the stepdaughter of Lazarine – to the tribune shortly thereafter, accusing the defendant of being abused and alcoholic.

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Johns said Lazarine was also very in control of Deborah, who acted as his caretaker, and had threatened to kill her so many times that she was no longer afraid of him when he said it.

She remembered a special incident in court when she was in high school where she walked into her parents' room to ask her mother, who was a hangover, for Raymond for water.

Johns said when her mother asked him for another cup, he sat down on top of her, pinned her and held a gun under her chin.

Just after the fatal shoot, Lazarine called his son Nathan just before noon to tell him he dreamed he had killed Deborah and woke up to find her lifeless in a pool of blood on the floor, lawyers claimed

Just after the fatal shoot, Lazarine called his son Nathan just before noon to tell him he dreamed he had killed Deborah and woke up to find her lifeless in a pool of blood on the floor, lawyers claimed

Just after the fatal shoot, Lazarine called his son Nathan just before noon to tell him he dreamed he had killed Deborah and woke up to find her lifeless in a pool of blood on the floor, lawyers claimed

Lazirene's son testified that his father had been under the care of a psychiatrist for more than a decade. He said that Lazirene had been prescribed psychotropic drugs, which he sometimes mixed with alcohol (Lazarine & # 39; s family home pictured above)
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Lazirene's son testified that his father had been under the care of a psychiatrist for more than a decade. He said that Lazirene had been prescribed psychotropic drugs, which he sometimes mixed with alcohol (Lazarine & # 39; s family home pictured above)

Lazirene's son testified that his father had been under the care of a psychiatrist for more than a decade. He said that Lazirene had been prescribed psychotropic drugs, which he sometimes mixed with alcohol (Lazarine & # 39; s family home pictured above)

Lazarine later repeated to the police that he thought he was in a dream while he executed the murder. Because of his apparent sleepy condition, Lazarine claims that his actions were involuntary

Lazarine later repeated to the police that he thought he was in a dream while he executed the murder. Because of his apparent sleepy condition, Lazarine claims that his actions were involuntary

Deborah Lazarine

Deborah Lazarine

Lazarine later repeated to the police that he thought he was in a dream while he executed the murder. Because of his apparent sleepy condition, Lazarine claims that his actions were involuntary

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Raymond Lazarine ran and owned a successful electrical engineering company. He and Deborah had been married 35 years before the murder, with no serious violations of the law or reports of abuse at home.

The defense called on four men, all of whom were locked up in one phase with Lazerine, to testify on Tuesday.

One by one, each of the men told them that they had woken up when he saw Lazerine walking in his sleep, both at night and during the day.

& # 39; There are witnesses there who have seen the manifestation of his sleep disorder, and we thought it would be important for the jury to know, & # 39; said Lazerine & # 39; s lawyer Feroz Merchant.

Lazarine's son testified that his father had been cared for by a psychiatrist for more than ten years. He said that Lazarine was prescribed psychotropic medication, which he sometimes mixed with alcohol.

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Lazarine told the police that he was talking about his prescription medication on the day of the shooting, NBC Houston reported.

If found guilty, Lazerine can face life in prison. Deborah's family says they just & # 39; want justice & # 39; after five long years of waiting.

The trial will resume on Wednesday.

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