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Man, 28, who worked as covid tracer, found dead FIVE DAYS after he failed to clock in

A 28-year-old man in Los Angeles died at his home and was only found five days after his death when a friend checked his apartment.

Dominic Green was a contract employee for the Los Angeles Department of Public Health and helped the city government track COVID-19 cases.

Green worked for Healthcare Staffing Professionals, a company that has provided Los Angeles County with nearly 1,000 employees since the start of the pandemic, 80% of whom are working from home.

“Good afternoon everyone, my shift is over,” Green emailed one afternoon last winter when his shift ended at 4:30 PM

Green had never met any of his colleagues because his work was remote, and a supervisor told his father, “We don’t really know people anywhere other than the work they do.”

Five days later, his parents, Joseph and Jeannine, checked his cell plan and realized he hadn’t used it.

They asked a nearby family friend to check on him, where he lay motionless on his bed.

Dominic Green, 28, was working as an epidemiologist in Los Angeles when he died suddenly of heart disease.  His body was not discovered until five days after his death

Dominic Green, 28, was working as an epidemiologist in Los Angeles when he died suddenly of heart disease. His body was not discovered until five days after his death

Green is seen here with family before he died in January 2022. Due to the way his body was decomposing, Green's family was unable to hold the open casket funeral they wished for.

Green is seen here with family before he died in January 2022. Due to the way his body was decomposing, Green’s family was unable to hold the open casket funeral they wished for.

It would later be revealed that Green died of cardiomyopathy, a heart condition that can sometimes lead to sudden death Los Angeles Times reported.

Because his body was decomposing, a coroner’s office detective told his parents ‘he is not visible’.

After earning a Master’s Degree in Public Health, Green moved from his family home in Michigan to Los Angeles for his new job in epidemiology, where he found an apartment in Koreatown.

Green told his parents that the job was a stepping stone and that he eventually wanted to earn a doctorate in epidemiology that he would use to help underserved communities.

He helped stack his resume with a part-time job on the weekends, conducting academic research on sickle cell disease.

On January 17, Joseph Green called a number his son had texted and reached Lisa Smith, a supervisor who worked with Dominic.

Green pictured with his mother Jeannine and sister.  Green's family are devout Seventh-day Adventists

Green pictured with his mother Jeannine and sister. Green’s family are devout Seventh-day Adventists

Green's family wanted to have an open casket, but due to decomposition they chose to show a life-sized cardboard cutout of Dominic next to his casket

Green’s family wanted to have an open casket, but due to decomposition they chose to show a life-sized cardboard cutout of Dominic next to his casket

Smith said she was concerned about Dominic after not hearing from him, but said “technically, he doesn’t work for us.”

After learning of his death, Green’s parents traveled to Los Angeles to sort out his belongings.

They had to wait to enter the apartment while a team equipped with hazmat suits and respirators cleaned the apartment.

Although Dominic was known to be an introvert, his family noticed that he had just amassed a wardrobe worth thousands of dollars, possibly in the hopes that he would soon stop working remotely.

His parents prepared his funeral in Michigan but were frustrated that he was not contacted earlier about their son’s absence from work.

Both his parents and his brother, Adriel, were listed as emergency contacts, and they believed a phone call would have allowed them to discover his body earlier.

His work did notice the absence and sent Green emails and texts asking him where he was.

When his father called one of his supervisors, Nathan Lehman, he asked Lehman, “Dominic didn’t show up. Why didn’t you check him?’

Lehman replied that he oversees more than 100 people and doesn’t like to get those employees in trouble because of absences.

A colleague said of Green: 'Dominic was known for his strong work ethic and character.  Character is what a person does when no one is looking'

A colleague said of Green: ‘Dominic was known for his strong work ethic and character. Character is what a person does when no one is looking’

“The job is your first point of contact,” says Jeannine, who believes there should be a law that allows employers to quickly call emergency contacts.

Lehman did give the family a few kind words before the funeral, saying, “Among the staff under my care, Dominic stood out for being exceptionally punctual — always logging in and out of his shifts right on time.”

The county health department believes they did everything they could to track down Green after he failed to show up for work. non-working holiday.’

“Public Health takes the wellbeing of our staff seriously and remains saddened by the passing of Dominic Green,” a department spokesman said in a statement. “During his time as a remote contract worker for DPH, Dominic’s hard work and dedication to public health impressed those he worked with.”

Only 16% of companies only hire remote workers, and 44% of companies do not allow remote work at all.

But since the start of the pandemic, nearly 70% of full-time workers have started doing at least some of their work from home.

On Friday, February 4, the Greens flew Dominic’s body to Florida, where the family has a crypt near Orlando. He was buried next to his maternal grandfather.

His family are devout Seventh-day Adventists and, in keeping with tradition, invited close friends and relatives to visit the coffin the night before the official funeral.

The family wanted to hold an open casket funeral for Dominic, but were told by the undertaker that “even with the embalming, he’s in pretty bad shape,” which prevented them from doing so.

Taking Dominic out of the refrigerator would be risky, and his father told those who spoke at the funeral to stick to the allotted time, because the undertakers feared “people will smell him.”

Instead, the family chose to display a life-sized cardboard cutout of Dominic next to his coffin.

The undertaker was able to save a lock of Dominic’s hair, which his mother kept.

During his talk, Joseph sharply reminded the audience, “Please know that no employer will take care of you like your family.”

After the funeral, his staff sent the family an e-card to express their condolences.

“Dominic was known for his strong work ethic and character,” Smith said. “Character is what a person does when no one is looking.”

One woman who worked with Dominic said ‘although we only shared a few emails here and there, he was very nice and will be missed very much.’

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