Magnetic resonance imaging reveals differences in how beatboxers and guitarists respond to music

It can be a surprise to discover that musicians perceive sounds differently than the average person. But according to a new study, there are also notable differences among the artists themselves. Stock image

It can be a surprise to discover that musicians perceive sounds differently than the average person.

But according to a new study, there are also notable differences among the artists themselves.

The magnetic resonances in the brains of guitarists and beatboxers have revealed that their answers to listen to unknown songs differ according to their trade; Meanwhile he “hand area” of a guitarist's brain lights up, is the “mouth area” which is activated for beatboxers.

It can be a surprise to discover that musicians perceive sounds differently than the average person. But according to a new study, there are also notable differences among the artists themselves. Stock image

It can be a surprise to discover that musicians perceive sounds differently than the average person. But according to a new study, there are also notable differences among the artists themselves. Stock image

“Most of the research in this area has focused on classically trained musicians, who have received extensive teaching since they were very young, but we discovered that beatboxers and professional guitarists also show typical neuronal patterns of these expert classical musicians.”, said the lead author, Dr. Saloni Krishnan, who completed the study while at the University College London.

“We are excited about these findings because they indicate that the experience of producing music changes the way we perceive it, perhaps explaining why professional musicians can refine their technical knowledge so easily to play complex pieces without having to think about each note.”.

In the new study published in the journal Cerebral Cortex, the researchers recruited 60 people to listen to recordings of beatbox and guitar melodies.

Half of the group were not musicians, while the rest were professional beatboxers and guitarists with an average of 8-9 years of experience.

Each of the clues was produced specifically for the study, so it would not be familiar to the participants; co-author Harry Yeff, known by the stage name Reeps One, produced the beatbox song.

And, the study revealed a series of differences.

While areas of the sensorimotor brain, which control movement, were activated in the brains of the musicians, this effect was not observed in non-musicians.

Areas of activity linked to where the activity to listen to beatboxing exceeds that of listening to guitar music are shown in red-yellow, the regions where guitar music activity exceeds that of guitar music are shown in blue-light blue . This highlights that beatboxers and guitarists show increases in activity over dorsal flow regions for the music they can produce. Non-musicians do not show a modulation by condition in these dorsal flow regions, but they do show a higher activity for beatbox> guitar music in the upper temporal cortex bilaterally.

Areas of activity linked to where the activity to listen to beatboxing exceeds that of listening to guitar music are shown in red-yellow, the regions where guitar music activity exceeds that of guitar music are shown in blue-light blue . This highlights that beatboxers and guitarists show increases in activity over dorsal flow regions for the music they can produce. Non-musicians do not show a modulation by condition in these dorsal flow regions, but they do show a higher activity for beatbox> guitar music in the upper temporal cortex bilaterally.

The red-yellow regions on the map show where the beatboxing activity exceeds that of listening to guitar tracks. Blue-light blue shows where the guitar exceeds

For the musicians, however, this activation was only seen when they heard a track of their own field.

This suggests that the brain is connecting the movements associated with making that music while the musician is listening, the researchers say.

The scans also showed an increase in brain activity in a region linked to language tasks, such as naming or reading images.

“We have identified a perception network that participates when you listen to an instrument that you can play and that shows how the acquisition of this experience has shaped your brain responses”, said the lead author, Professor Sophie Scott.

“There is already a lot of evidence that music education is good for you, here is an example of what makes the brain”.

<img id =”i-b97c3acc09e2b14f” src =”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/09/06/21/4FCBDF4600000578-0-image-a-13_1536264126469.jpg” height =”425″ width =”634″ alt =”Meanwhile he “hand area” of a guitarist's brain lights up, is the “mouth area” which is activated in the beatboxers. Positive values ​​indicate more activity for beatboxing, while negative values ​​suggest more activity for guitar music” class=”blkBorder img-share” />

<img id =”i-b97c3acc09e2b14f” src =”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/09/06/21/4FCBDF4600000578-0-image-a-13_1536264126469.jpg” height =”425″ width =”634″ alt =”Meanwhile he “hand area” of a guitarist's brain lights up, is the “mouth area” which is activated in the beatboxers. Positive values ​​indicate more activity for beatboxing, while negative values ​​suggest more activity for guitar music” class=”blkBorder img-share” />

Meanwhile he “hand area” of a guitarist's brain lights up, is the “mouth area” which is activated in the beatboxers. Positive values ​​indicate more activity for beatboxing, while negative values ​​suggest more activity for guitar music

The areas activated in the brains of the musicians also differed.

For beatboxers, listening to a beatboxing track spurred activity in the region that controls mouth movements.

For guitarists, on the other hand, listening to a guitar track led to greater activity in an area responsible for the movement of the hand.

COULD YOUR BRAIN PREDICT IF YOU ARE A MUSICIAN OR NOT?

Scientists from Finland's Aarhus University conducted a study of 18 musicians and 18 non-musicians.

The participants listened to several different genres of music throughout the study

The researchers measured their brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

<img id =”i-319cb423dbeef23b” src =”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2018/01/24/00/4883FEFF00000578-5304983-The_brain_areas_hat_can_best_predict_musicianship_are_located_i-m-10_1516752769192.jpg” height =”400″ width =”586″ alt =”The brain areas that can best predict musical mastery are in the right hemisphere” class=”blkBorder img-share” />

<img id =”i-319cb423dbeef23b” src =”https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2018/01/24/00/4883FEFF00000578-5304983-The_brain_areas_hat_can_best_predict_musicianship_are_located_i-m-10_1516752769192.jpg” height =”400″ width =”586″ alt =”The brain areas that can best predict musical mastery are in the right hemisphere” class=”blkBorder img-share” />

The brain areas that can best predict musical mastery are in the right hemisphere

The scans showed that certain areas of the brain can predict musicality

In particular, the frontal and temporal areas of the right hemisphere of the brain indicate musicality

The scientists also developed an automatic learning algorithm to predict behavior

The algorithm was able to accurately predict musicality 77% of the time

“This study reveals the intimate empathy that began when observing or listening to another specialist in his field”said Yeff.

“Surprisingly, beatboxing in 2018 embraces a new kind of vocal technique, challenging the previously established limitations of what is vocally possible.

“This study is an example of how beatboxing is revealing the many lessons that the human voice has about how our minds interact with our bodies”.

The researchers say the discovery could have implications beyond the music industry.

“Perhaps more research could tell us if beatboxing could be a way to get people to reconnect their vocal cords with the act of making sounds related to speech, for people who have lost the mechanical ability to produce speech”Professor Scott said.

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