Maddie Pulver: ‘Collarbomber’ Paul Douglas Peters Expected To Get Parole

BREAKING NEWS: ‘Collarbomber’ who strapped a fake explosive device around the neck of a Sydney schoolgirl FINALLY apologizes to his victim 10 years later – as he is likely to walk free in weeks

  • Madeleine Pulver had a fake collar bomb strapped to her neck for 10 hours
  • Paul Douglas Peters broke into the home of 18-year-old Mrs. Pulver . in August 2011.
  • During a conditional hearing on Friday, Peters offered ‘deeply well-founded’ apologies
  • Peters is expected to be released from prison in the coming months

The infamous “collar bomber” who broke into the home of a Sydney businessman and strapped an explosive device around a schoolgirl’s neck has publicly apologized to his victim ten years later.

Almost exactly 10 years ago, Paul Douglas Peters, 60, broke into a Mosman home and tied an alleged collar bomb around the neck of Year 12 student Madeleine Pulver.

The city was gripped by horror for 10 hours before it was determined to be a hoax. Peters was later jailed, but his sentence expires on August 14, and the State Parole Authority has indicated that it has accepted expert opinion recommending that he be released on parole.

At the conclusion of a brief Friday morning hearing, Peters made a surprising offer to apologize to his victim.

Madeleine Pulver fell victim to a terrifying 10-hour hoax bomb threat when Paul Douglas Peters broke into her home and tied a fake neck bomb around her neck in August 2011.

Paul Douglas Peters (left) has spent nearly a decade in jail after strapping a fake collar bomb around Sydney schoolgirl Madeleine Pulver's neck

Above a young Madeleine Pulver from about the time of the incident

Paul Douglas Peters (left) has spent nearly a decade in jail after strapping a fake collar bomb around Sydney schoolgirl Madeleine Pulver’s neck

Peters began: ‘If I may say something, if you don’t mind. I never had a chance to say in public that -‘

The false collar bomber was cut off by Judge Mark Marien, who said his lawyer probably told the court everything that can be said on his behalf.

Peters continued: ‘…A heartfelt apology to Madeleine Pulver, nothing more’.

Ms. Pulver was an 18-year-old HSC student when Peters broke into her house wearing a balaclava and placed the fake bomb on her.

A note attached to the device demanded money and said it would explode if tampered with.

At sentencing, a court judge discovered that Peters’ likely motivation was greed, hoping to blackmail Pulver’s father.

A file photo of the 'collar bomb' hoax made by Paul Douglas Peters, as presented in court during his case

A file photo of the ‘collar bomb’ hoax made by Paul Douglas Peters, as presented in court during his case

Above is Mosman's house which in 2011 became the scene of one of Sydney's most famous crimes

Above is Mosman’s house which in 2011 became the scene of one of Sydney’s most famous crimes

The State Parole Authority, the independent body that decides Peters’ fate, has received comments from authorities, Peter’s lawyer and the Community Corrections Office.

It has already received advice from the Serious Offenders Review Council, which has ruled that Peters is unlikely to repeat himself.

Peters claimed during his sentencing hearing that he could not recall attaching the device to Ms. Pulver’s neck.

Ms. Pulver and a team of police who helped her through the ordeal received bravery awards in 2017.

Judge Marien told Peters on Friday that he will be briefed on what happens next before his parole.

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