Louisiana teacher loses her job because of the racist Facebook comment about the Nike Colin Kaepernick campaign

Valerie Scogin, a high school math teacher in Slidell, Louisiana, lost her job after posting a racially insensitive Facebook comment about the Nike Colin Kaepernick campaign, in which she wrote:

Valerie Scogin, high school math teacher at Slidell, Louisiana, lost her job after posting a racially insensitive Facebook comment about the Nike Colin Kaepernick campaign, in which she wrote: "Tell people of that color to stop act like animals "

A teacher in Louisiana lost her job because of a racially insensitive comment from Facebook about the Nike Colin Kaepernick campaign in which she wrote: "Tell people of that color to stop acting like animals."

Math teacher Valerie Scogin provoked outrage in the suburb of Slidell, Louisiana, when screenshots of her post about the former San Francisco 49ers quarterback were distributed to students and parents.

Kaepernick sparked controversy when he began to kneel during the national anthem in the 2016 NFL season as a way to protest against racial inequality and police brutality.

Nike focused its 30th anniversary campaign on "Just Do It" on the movement of the soccer player, and posted an ad with the words: "Stand for something, even if that means sacrificing everything" for Kaepernick's face.

On September 5, two days after the campaign came out, Scogin commented in a Facebook post: "You do not have to live in that country. They could return. But it was their own people who sold them into slavery to start and tear them even worse in those countries of origin.

"I do not want to be stereotyped, to tell people of that color to stop acting like animals and perpetuate the stereotype, many are average people, the few ruin it."

The screen captures of Scogin's commentary on September 5 have been distributed in the community

The screen captures of Scogin's commentary on September 5 have been distributed in the community

The screen captures of Scogin's commentary on September 5 have been distributed in the community

Scogin's comment was in response to the campaign & # 39; Just Do It & # 39; of the 30th anniversary of Nike, which presents the words: "Defend something. Even if that means sacrificing everything & # 39; on the face of the former NFL quarterback

Scogin's comment was in response to the campaign & # 39; Just Do It & # 39; of the 30th anniversary of Nike, which presents the words: "Defend something. Even if that means sacrificing everything & # 39; on the face of the former NFL quarterback

Scogin's comment was in response to the campaign & # 39; Just Do It & # 39; of the 30th anniversary of Nike, which presents the words: "Defend something. Even if that means sacrificing everything & # 39; on the face of the former NFL quarterback

While it was not clear who exactly the publication referred to, many parents have criticized Scogin's comment as racist.

"Absolutely the connotations, I could not miss that, I could not lose that, I do not know who could do it," said Cadra Menard, father of Slidell High School, to WWL-TV.

"It makes me furious to know that such an adult can influence our children for eight hours a day without our consent, which only bothers me a lot."

Mother Susan Gould said: "That's something I do not want with my children."

Another father who knows that Scogin personally defended the educator, saying he does not think the words were so incendiary.

"If I did not know her, I would take it as an insult," said Kristan Wilson, "but I know her, so I'd say she said it wrong and that people took it the wrong way."

Scogin had worked at Slidell High School (above) in the suburb of New Orleans since 2008

Scogin had worked at Slidell High School (above) in the suburb of New Orleans since 2008

Scogin had worked at Slidell High School (above) in the suburb of New Orleans since 2008

Kaepernick (left) sparked controversy when he began to kneel during the national anthem in the 2016 NFL season as a way to protest against racial inequality and police brutality.

Kaepernick (left) sparked controversy when he began to kneel during the national anthem in the 2016 NFL season as a way to protest against racial inequality and police brutality.

Kaepernick (left) sparked controversy when he began to kneel during the national anthem in the 2016 NFL season as a way to protest against racial inequality and police brutality.

Scogin, who had worked at Slidell High School since 2008, then posted an apology, according to nola.com.

"I made some comments that went against my better judgment (sic) and sensitivities, now I wish I had not done it," he wrote.

"Anyone who has known me for some time should know that the last thing I want to do is hurt someone.

"I apologize for what I said and I sincerely wish to avoid this in the future."

The School Board of San Tammany Parish issued a statement saying that it had initiated an investigation of the episode.

"This incident does not reflect the values, mission and vision of our district, and we remain committed to providing a school culture that is inclusive and meets the needs of all of our students, employees and community," the board statement said.

The school authorities have refused to comment on whether Scogin resigned or was fired.

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