Louisiana loses a piece of land from the football field to the ocean every 90 minutes

Since the late 1920s, Louisiana has shrunk by more than 2,000 square miles due to man-made control over the Mississippi River, and now the state is fighting a staggering rate of land loss.

Every 90 minutes, the Pelican state loses 100 yards, or the equivalent of a soccer field, on land.

The changing landscape of the state is so fast that maps must be constantly redrawn, but every update is quickly made irrelevant, as depicted by Nola.com writer Brett Anderson.

The & # 39; land-loss crisis & # 39; as it is called is caused by the need to control the Mississippi River and the resulting loss of land formation in sediment areas in sensitive areas, the Louisiana State University Center for River Studies and the state's Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority (CPRA) have explained the New Yorker.

The state hopes to combat land loss through controlled flood and land creation projects with the aid of $ 20 billion BP oil spill.

But to keep up with the loss, the state would have to build 168 hectares of new land every nine days.

It means that state officials are virtually helpless in stopping parts of the state that disappear under water.

& # 39; We are in a tough fight against sea level rise and fall & # 39 ;, said CPRA engineer Brad Barth. & # 39; We will each try to dredge our river sediment that we can say, but added: & # 39; We must dare to be. & # 39;

Louisiana has shrunk by more than 2,000 square kilometers as a result of man-made control over the Mississippi River since the 1920s, and now the state is fighting an astounding amount of land loss. An image of Louisiana as depicted on maps is shown on the left, next to what could be a more accurate drawing of the state, on the right

Louisiana has shrunk by more than 2,000 square kilometers as a result of man-made control over the Mississippi River since the 1920s, and now the state is fighting an astounding amount of land loss. An image of Louisiana as depicted on maps is shown on the left, next to what could be a more accurate drawing of the state, on the right

The loss of land is due to the closure of the Mississippi River, which has ensured that sediment has not been rebuilt because the land has been damaged by the ocean. These satellite images of the Isle de Jean Charles were captured on April 9, 1985 (left) and April 1, 2017 (right). Pay attention to the blue colored areas, which represent water between brown pieces of land

& # 39; We are in a tough fight against sea level rise and fall & # 39 ;, said CPRA engineer Brad Barth. & # 39; We will try to dredge every ounce of sediment from the river that we can, he said, but added: & # 39; We must be bold. & # 39;

The amount of land lost in Louisiana in the last 100 years is larger than the size of Rhode Island, and almost as large as the state of Delaware.

The drastic amount of erosion is due to the complicated system of dikes, flood walls and shelters that the Flood Control Act of 1928, passed on after the Great Flood, one of the huge disasters in New Orleans, demanded.

The great Mississippi River was finally controlled, much to the delight of the settlers and the Army Corps of Engineers at the time, who said: "We used it, straightened it, regularized it, glued it in."

But the shackles eventually led to the loss of much of the land that these engineers tried to protect, because the sediments used to replenish lost land when the Mississippi flooded also remained entangled in the river and in the carefully deposited overflow intended to minimize the destruction of the rough waters.

Due to a lack of sediment that fed the country in Louisiana in recent years, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has officially deprived 31 plaquemines of parish placements because the landmass simply no longer exists.

So while you still see Bay Jacquin and Dry Cypress Bayou appearing on a map, if you try to visit it, nobody will be home.

Now the state hopes to use the same method to control the river to undo part of the unintended damage.

A new project for public works aims to create man-made parishes, with the most developed plan to date focused on the Plaquemines Parish.

The state hopes to combat land loss through controlled flood and land creation projects with price tags of up to tens of millions of dollars. This file photo of February 14, 2017 shows Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, one of the small, shrinking islands of the state

The state hopes to combat land loss through controlled flood and land creation projects with price tags of up to tens of millions of dollars. This file photo of February 14, 2017 shows Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, one of the small, shrinking islands of the state

The state hopes to combat land loss through controlled flood and land creation projects with price tags of up to tens of millions of dollars. This file photo of February 14, 2017 shows Isle de Jean Charles, Louisiana, one of the small, shrinking islands of the state

The plan included an amount of concrete and loose stones that was sufficient to cover Greenwich Village in New York City (covering 185 hectares), and will make a stream of water so strong that it becomes the twelfth largest river in the country. .

These plans are sorted by experts such as those at LSU & # 39; s Center for River Studies in Baton Rouge, where engineers are working on a scale model of the Mississippi region of 1: 6,000 to try to understand where we went wrong and how we can try to repair it, or at least reduce the damage.

As the New Yorker put it while observing the operating model of how the Mississippi River has been manipulated over time: & # 39; Here, in black and white, was the land loss dilemma of Louisiana. If the river had been left to its fate, a super-wet spring like that of 2011 would have let the Mississippi and its distributions flow down their banks.

& # 39; The water would have been disastrous, but they would have tens of millions of tons of sand and clay spread over thousands of square kilometers of countryside. The new sediment is said to have formed a new layer of soil and in this way prevented subsidence.

& # 39; Thanks to the intervention of the engineers there had been no spillover, no havoc and therefore no land formation. The future of southern Louisiana was exhausted in the sea instead. & # 39;

The CPRA, founded in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina destroyed the area, is an organization that works to prevent the disappearance of Louisiana.

The CPRA, founded in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina destroyed the area, is an organization that works to prevent the disappearance of Louisiana. A wetland is seen on August 18, 2015 near the city of New Orleans, Louisiana

The CPRA, founded in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina destroyed the area, is an organization that works to prevent the disappearance of Louisiana. A wetland is seen on August 18, 2015 near the city of New Orleans, Louisiana

The CPRA, founded in 2005 after Hurricane Katrina destroyed the area, is an organization that works to prevent the disappearance of Louisiana. A wetland is seen on August 18, 2015 near the city of New Orleans, Louisiana

Its mission is to implement & # 39; projects related to the protection, conservation, enhancement and restoration of the coastal area of ​​the state & # 39 ;.

The organization has a comprehensive master plan & # 39; came up with dozens of & # 39; marsh creation & # 39; projects as planned for the Plaquemines Parish, each expected to cost millions to tens of millions of dollars.

CPRA & # 39; s costly program would essentially be eight holes in existing dikes along the Mississippi River two by TS main distribution, the Atchafalaya.

Those openings will be controlled with gates and channels, which will be imposed themselves, all in the hope that the sediment & # 39; of course & # 39; flows as it would have been if people had never intervened in the first place.

The first of such projects, called Mid-Barataria Sediment Diversion, is expected to cost $ 1.4 billion.

The & # 39; Mid-Breton & # 39; is next in line, expected to cost $ 800 million, and is planned to rebuild the east bank of the Plaquemines.

The financing comes from the BP oil spill, thanks to the tragic disaster in 2010, when more than three million barrels of oil entered the Gulf of Mexico, polluting the coast of Florida to Texas.

In addition to the cost of land creations, Louisiana must also spend moving people who are caught without a house in the mess.

In March 2018, the Louisiana Office of Community Development announced that it would spend $ 11.7 million on a 515-acre piece of land to relocate around 80 residents of the Isle de Jean Charles.

Since last year, the island has lost 98 percent of its land area since 1955 because sea level has risen due to climate change.

Most residents of the sinking area are Indians, as members of the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Indians and the United Houma Nation.

Groundbreaking is expected this year at the Schriever resettlement project in the northern part of the Terrebonne parish.

In addition to the cost of land creations, Louisiana must also spend moving people who are caught without a house in the mess. In March 2018, the Louisiana Office of Community Development announced that it would spend $ 11.7 million on a 515-acre piece of land to relocate around 80 residents of the Isle de Jean Charles. This satellite image of the Isle de Jean Charles was captured on 5 February 1963

In addition to the cost of land creations, Louisiana must also spend moving people who are caught without a house in the mess. In March 2018, the Louisiana Office of Community Development announced that it would spend $ 11.7 million on a 515-acre piece of land to relocate around 80 residents of the Isle de Jean Charles. This satellite image of the Isle de Jean Charles was captured on February 5, 1963

In addition to the cost of land creations, Louisiana must also spend moving people who are caught without a house in the mess. In March 2018, the Louisiana Office of Community Development announced that it would spend $ 11.7 million on a 515-acre piece of land to relocate around 80 residents of the Isle de Jean Charles. This satellite image of the Isle de Jean Charles was captured on 5 February 1963

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