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Lorna Jane is fined $ 40,000 for claiming that their ‘antivirus LEGGINGS’ could protect against COVID-19

Iconic activewear company Lorna Jane is fined $ 40,000 for ‘claiming his’ antivirus LEGGINGS could protect against COVID-19′

  • Lorna Jane has been fined $ 40,000 for violating the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989
  • The new line of the Activewear brand is said to have claimed that it was protected against viruses
  • Medical professionals accuse the brand of trying to exploit COVID-19 panic

Lorna Jane was reportedly fined $ 39,960 are activewear ‘protected against viruses and germs’.

The company was forced to advertise its ‘exclusive’ LJ Shield technology after it was accused of taking advantage of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Therapeutic Goods Association imposed the fine on the company on Friday after an investigation.

“This type of advertising can have an adverse effect on the Australian community, create a false sense of security and make people less vigilant about hygiene and social distance,” Adj. Professor John Skerritt, deputy secretary for the Department of Health, said.

Lorna Jane was fined $ 39,960 for claiming their activewear was “protected against viruses and germs” (shown: model in Lorna Jane clothes)

A Lorna Jane spokesperson denied that they were trying to take advantage of the environment of fear (Image: Lorna Jane Clarkson)

A Lorna Jane spokesperson denied that they were trying to take advantage of the environment of fear (Image: Lorna Jane Clarkson)

A Lorna Jane spokesperson denied that they were trying to take advantage of the environment of fear (Image: Lorna Jane Clarkson)

Lorna Jane was forced to advertise the 'exclusive' LJ Shield technology (photo)

Lorna Jane was forced to advertise the 'exclusive' LJ Shield technology (photo)

Lorna Jane was forced to advertise the ‘exclusive’ LJ Shield technology (photo)

The TGA claims that the company could be penalized under the Therapeutic Goods Act 1989 for calling the product “antivirus activewear.”

The advertisement for the product, which reportedly did not list the side effects, was considered “seriously concerned” due to the pandemic.

Currently, all references to COVID-19 are limited in all forms of promotion and advertisements are considered illegal without permission from the TGA.

Online marketing material suggested that Lorna Jane had developed a technology that could be sprayed onto clothing to stop the spread of bacteria.

The website reportedly claimed that the LJ shield “breaks through the membrane shell of all toxic diseases,” including “bacteria or germs that come into contact with it, not only kill those microbes but prevent them from multiplying.”

The President of the Royal Australian College of General Practition, Dr. Harry Nespolon, beat the company and accused it of deliberately misleading buyers.

“Activewear is great for the gym, but it can’t protect you from viruses or bacteria,” said Dr. Nespolon.

The Therapeutic Goods Association imposed the fine on the company on Friday after an investigation (photo: model in Lorna Jane clothes)

The Therapeutic Goods Association imposed the fine on the company on Friday after an investigation (photo: model in Lorna Jane clothes)

The Therapeutic Goods Association imposed the fine on the company on Friday after an investigation (photo: model in Lorna Jane clothes)

“I suspect Lorna Jane is cynically trying to exploit the fears associated with the COVID-19 pandemic to sell clothes.”

He said it was irresponsible advice that could appease people into a false sense of security.

“If you spray their product on a fabric and expect it to act as a ‘shield of protection’ for you by breaking through the ‘membrane of all toxic diseases’, I have bad news for you – this won’t happen,” he said .

“The only thing” ended “by the” shield particles “is the money in your bank account.”

The alleged branding has since been taken from the website and changed to remove every mention of the word virus.

The new materials call the technology ‘antibacterial’.

Since complaints were made about the new active wear technology, the branding has been removed from the website and changed to remove every mention of the word virus

Since complaints were made about the new active wear technology, the branding has been removed from the website and changed to remove every mention of the word virus

Since complaints were made about the new active wear technology, the branding has been removed from the website and changed to remove every mention of the word virus

The new materials instead refer to the technology as 'antibacterial'

The new materials instead refer to the technology as 'antibacterial'

The new materials instead refer to the technology as ‘antibacterial’

“We don’t want to alarm you, but we’ve been avoiding germs long before COVID-19,” the website now reads.

A Lorna Jane spokesperson denied that they were trying to take advantage of the fear environment.

“We started working on this technology at the beginning of the year when we mentioned it … we didn’t want to mislead anyone,” the spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia.

The active clothing brand was founded by Lorna Jane Clarkson (photo)

The active clothing brand was founded by Lorna Jane Clarkson (photo)

The active clothing brand was founded by Lorna Jane Clarkson (photo)

“We’re not trying to take advantage of the fear surrounding COVID-19 in any way because we were developing it and working on it with our partners before the outbreak.

“Our tests show that LJ Shield is an important part of stopping the spread of both bacteria and viral infections and should be used in conjunction with other precautions such as face masks and thorough and frequent hand washing.”

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