Loose Women viewers argue that women should be on transitional leave

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Should employers offer menopause leave? Loose Women’s Jane Moore claims it would be ‘detrimental’ to women’s equality – but viewers claim the symptoms could be ‘physically and mentally debilitating’

  • Loose Women hosts debated whether employers should give menopause leave
  • Comes after Sadiq Khan announced plans for a ‘menopausal policy’ at City Hall
  • Jane Moore and Brenda Edwards argued it would put women back into work
  • However, viewers felt that people with severe symptoms should be given sick leave

Loose Women Jane Moore says employers should not offer time off work for menopausal symptoms because it can “ harm women in the workplace. ”

Host Jane, 58, who appeared on the ITV show today, debated with fellow presenters Brenda Edwards and Penny Lancaster about whether women should be released for symptoms of their menopause.

It comes after London Mayor Sadiq Khan announced he wants to introduce a ‘menopause policy’ at City Hall to support workers.

While Jane and Brenda were against the idea, believing that it would eventually put women back in the workplace, viewers said the symptoms could be “ debilitating physically and mentally. ”

Loose Women’s Jane Moore (pictured) says employers shouldn’t offer time off for menopausal symptoms because it could “ harm women in the workplace ”

Host Jane, who appeared on the ITV show today, spoke with fellow presenter Brenda Edwards (left) about whether women should be given time off for symptoms of their menopause

Host Jane, who appeared on the ITV show today, spoke with fellow presenter Brenda Edwards (left) about whether women should be released for symptoms of their menopause

When asked if she thought women should be on menopause leave, Jane said, “ If you have severe symptoms, yes.

‘But I think if you apply the overarching sentiment to menstruation, pregnancy, menopause, natural things in a woman’s life, if you impose the overarching feeling that they are going to be a big deal, I think it will be women in the world harm. workplace.

“But if you have severe symptoms during those natural life events, then you should absolutely be able to go to your boss and say,” I need some time off because I’m not feeling well, “as with any illness.

“But I don’t think there should be a blanket” Women need extra time when they go through menopause, “because some women have no problem with it and go on perfectly normal.”

Viewers quickly took to Twitter to voice their opinions, arguing that for many women, the symptoms can be `` physically and mentally disabling. ''

Viewers quickly took to Twitter to voice their opinions, arguing that for many women, the symptoms can be “ physically and mentally disabling. ”

WHAT IS THE MENOPAUSE AND HOW CAN YOU DELAY IT?

Menopause is defined as the changes a woman goes through just before and after she stops her period and is no longer able to conceive naturally.

Some women go through this time with little or no symptoms, about 60 percent will experience symptoms that lead to behavioral changes, and one in four will suffer severely.

Common symptoms include hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness leading to discomfort during sex, disturbed sleep, decreased sex drive, problems with memory and concentration, and mood swings.

Last year, a fertility doctor revealed that women can delay menopause for up to 20 years with a 30-minute operation that makes their biological clocks think they are much younger than they are.

Conceived by the fertility expert who pioneered IVF, the surgical procedure sees tissue from the ovaries thawed and then transplanted back into the armpit.

It also has the potential to increase fertility – although doctors say the goal is to delay menopause rather than give women the chance to have babies into their 60s.

Ovarian transplantation or cyrop preservation of ovarian tissue involves taking healthy tissue from a woman’s ovaries to delay the onset of menopause.

In the 30-minute operation, which is privately available in the UK, a surgeon takes healthy cells from the woman’s ovary and freezes them at temperatures of -150 ° C.

If the patient wishes, they can be thawed and reinserted through the armpit.

When the ovarian tissue begins to function, it produces hormones that prevent menopause.

Brenda, 52, agreed that although she suffers from symptoms herself, she is an ‘open person’ and is happy to discuss any additional needs in the workplace.

She continued: ‘I know it can be grueling for so many women, but as Jane says, I think we’ve come this far in terms of women’s equality at work – I just don’t think it’s necessary to do anything else. to emphasize. ‘

But Penny, 50, argued it’s “important” to highlight the problems women experience during menopause, including mental health issues.

Jane went on to argue that while women should be able to talk about their health, it could be “ problematic ” for small businesses to give women days off because of their menopause symptoms.

Brenda, 52, agreed that although she suffers from symptoms herself, she is an 'open person' and is happy to discuss any additional needs in the workplace.

Brenda, 52, agreed that although she suffers from symptoms herself, she is an ‘open person’ and is happy to discuss any additional needs in the workplace.

Penny, 50, argued it's 'important' to highlight the problems women experience during menopause, including mental health issues

Penny, 50, argued it’s ‘important’ to highlight the problems women experience during menopause, including mental health issues

Viewers quickly took to Twitter to voice their opinions, with one writing, “Severe symptoms should be accepted as a reason for absenteeism.”

Another said, ‘Think it would be helpful to have the option as some symptoms can be quite debilitating both physically and mentally.

A third agreed, “ I think the offer should be there for extreme symptoms (anything out of control). I also think the same is true for menstrual symptoms – because some are just unbearable, making you unusable for work, but unless you have found it difficult to understand. ‘

Another wrote: ‘I think the offer should be there for extreme symptoms (anything out of control). I also think the same is true for menstrual symptoms – as some are just unbearable, making you unusable for work, but unless you have found it difficult to understand. ‘

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