Look at people's back and neck by clicking on what viewers call "better than porn"

Videos of people who have their necks and backs cracked in place are attracting millions of online visitors, as people say that the clips are addictive and fascinating in a similar way to see the places that appear.

Videos of people with giant spots have been gathering legions of viewers for years, but now another type of therapy attracts fans online.

Chiropractors who break people's neck and back are accumulating millions of visits in their sometimes grotesque videos.

More and more people are happy to see therapists pulling people's heads to one side and crunching ribs and shoulders.

Fans of the trend say the videos are "addictive", "more attractive than Love Island" and "better than porn".

And the satisfaction of seeing the pains and pains of people bruised with a snap of the back is enough for a video to have obtained 13 million visits.

Videos of people who have their necks and backs cracked in place are attracting millions of online visitors, as people say that the clips are addictive and fascinating in a similar way to see the places that appear.

Videos of people who have their necks and backs cracked in place are attracting millions of online visitors, as people say that the clips are addictive and fascinating in a similar way to see the places that appear.

Seeing a stranger wriggle and bend over the massage table or return to its original shape may not seem like the best television, but it seems to have an intrigue similar to that of the spots.

And while Dr. Pimple Popper is considered the queen of rude skin videos, a man named Dr. Ian Rossborough is one of the great names in the brittle world.

His Chiro Core channel has more than 330,000 subscribers and shows videos of his patients being pressured and rustled again at his clinic in Melbourne.

A 53 minute compilation on Dr. Ian's channel has been viewed 13 million times and has more than 3,500 comments.

And although some clips seem satisfactory and controlled readjustments, others show alarmingly fast head turns.

But something common to most of them is the satisfactory sound of the bones and the muscles that return to their place.

One fan said: "Chiropractic videos are so addictive and even more visible than Love Island," The Sun reported.

"The sounds are very satisfying, and the transformations in the patients can be incredible."

The clips posted online show chiropractors writhing and shaking people's necks and returning to their place, and fans say the videos are "even more visible than the island of love."

The clips posted online show chiropractors writhing and shaking people's necks and returning to their place, and fans say the videos are "even more visible than the island of love."

The clips posted online show chiropractors writhing and shaking people's necks and returning to their place, and fans say the videos are "even more visible than the island of love."

Some of the patients in the film feel so much pain that they can not walk properly or stand up, but a quick manipulation of a chiropractor seems to give a new boost to life.

Chiropractic is a therapy in which a chiropractor uses his hands to manipulate a patient's muscles, bones and joints to try to relieve pain or improve flexibility.

WHY DO PEOPLE ENJOY TIGHTENING POINTS?

In July 2018, a neuroscientist explained that it is normal for people to get involved and be surprised by the videos of the leaping grains.

Internet obsession is popular because certain people have evolved to get pleasure from the blows that are removed from the skin.

Videos like those made by dermatologist Sandra Lee, also known as Dr Pimple Popper, are common in social networks, and the Californian doctor even has his own television show.

The neuroscientist Heather Berlin, of Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, says that everything is due to the need of people to stay healthy and eliminate possibly dangerous things from their bodies.

She told the Washington Post: "Evolutely speaking, it's a normal behavior to want to eliminate the lumps on your skin."

This is because such blows are potentially parasites or other unwanted visitors, explained Dr. Berlin.

He added that the tightening points stimulate a part of the brain that reacts to dopamine, a chemical reward, and gives people "a little stroke of pleasure."

It is considered an alternative therapy, which means that it is not a normal medical therapy, and is generally not available in the NHS.

Under a video in which the patient moans during the procedure, a viewer commented: "This is better than pornography."

Another commentator said: "I can not be the only one who can sit here for hours listening to people who jump."

And one added: "Seeing this is a great fetish of mine … I do not know why."

One of Dr. Ian's videos shows him helping a 17-year-old boy who sent him a message on Facebook saying he could not stand or walk properly due to a numbness in his leg.

The boy had had "unbearable pain" three months after attempting to tear out the root of a tree, and entered the folded clinic.

But after some jolts in the back and neck by Dr. Ian, in the video that has been seen 8.6 million times, the child can stop and return to normal a week later.

And the videos could be promoting chiropractic services everywhere.

Dr. Mike Paull of the Wigan Family Chiropractic Clinic told The Sun that the videos are "an inspiration to chiropractors around the globe."

"As a chiropractor based in the United Kingdom," he said. "We have patients who come into our clinic, they show us the videos of Dr. Ian and they ask us:" Can you do this? "on a regular basis.

"His example makes me happy to be a chiropractor."

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