Londoners rage on the second day of the Extinction Rebellion promotion

Nearly 300 people have been arrested in London for ongoing protests against climate change. The organizers now promise to escalate their disruption and reach the London metro tomorrow.

When the second day of coordinated protests at five locations in London came to an end, groups of police officers kept activists off the ground and kept them away from demonstrations in Oxford Circus and Waterloo Bridge that had issued Section 14 messages that ordered the crowd to turn around spreading.

Earlier, organizers Extinction Rebellion called on more protesters to help the bridge with their stand-off, which police said they had closed 55 bus routes and would have harassed 500,000 people.

Another 168 people were arrested in the course of today, the Metropolitan Police said, bringing the total arrests to 290 since the protests started yesterday morning. Almost all of them are meant to obstruct the highway, in violation of a police order that tries to limit the protests to the area around Marble Arch.

Tomorrow, the group threatened to focus on subway stations, with the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, saying that he & # 39; extremely concerned & # 39; was about the prospect of the intended transport hubs.

The campaign group said it plans to launch & # 39; Tube services & # 39; to disrupt the need for ecological collapse if the government does not meet its members.

It added: & # 39; Participants will peacefully break the law to stop the tube and then wait to be arrested.

# We offer our sincere apologies to anyone who may suffer as a result of this disruption. In all other circumstances we would never dream of disrupting the pipe, but this is an emergency.

& # 39; We ask that employees do not intervene in the protests to ensure that they go as smoothly and safely as possible for all involved. & # 39;

It is not clear how the group intends to disrupt Tube services.

When night fell, police continued to arrest detainees and remove non-existent protesters who had refused to leave the Oxford Circus demo

When night fell, police continued to arrest detainees and remove non-existent protesters who had refused to leave the Oxford Circus demo

Police begin arrests after handing out Protestants with a message in Section 14 at an improvised rave in Oxford Circus as hundreds of environmental activists from the Extinction Rebellion

Police begin arrests after handing out Protestants with a message in Section 14 at an improvised rave in Oxford Circus as hundreds of environmental activists from the Extinction Rebellion

Police begin arrests after handing out Protestants with a message in Section 14 at an improvised rave in Oxford Circus as hundreds of environmental activists from the Extinction Rebellion

Yesterday, police ordered demonstrators to disperse from Waterloo Bridge and today issued the same instruction for Oxford Circus - before they went across the street when they were ignored

Yesterday, police ordered demonstrators to disperse from Waterloo Bridge and today issued the same instruction for Oxford Circus - before they went across the street when they were ignored

Yesterday, police ordered demonstrators to disperse from Waterloo Bridge and today issued the same instruction for Oxford Circus – before they went across the street when they were ignored

Today, police warned people blocking Waterloo Bridge under public order and arrested them when they refused to move to Marble Arch

Today, police warned people blocking Waterloo Bridge under public order and arrested them when they refused to move to Marble Arch

Today, police warned people blocking Waterloo Bridge under public order and arrested them when they refused to move to Marble Arch

A police officer talks to a demonstrator as they remove people from a blockade on Waterloo Bridge during the second day of a coordinated protest by the Extinction Rebellion group

A police officer talks to a demonstrator as they remove people from a blockade on Waterloo Bridge during the second day of a coordinated protest by the Extinction Rebellion group

A police officer talks to a demonstrator as they remove people from a blockade on Waterloo Bridge during the second day of a coordinated protest by the Extinction Rebellion group

The activists – responsible for a naked protest in parliament earlier this month – want ministers to set a legally binding target to reduce net carbon emissions to zero by 2025.

It turned out this evening that the police met members of Extinction Rebellion several times when they decided to close London.

How a police cell shortage may have made arrests more difficult

The police had to postpone arresting protesters because they reportedly had no cells.

The Met has 638 cells that work 24 hours a day. But renovations at the Charing Cross police station, which has 42 cells, are hampering efforts to arrest eco-activists yesterday.

The only other custody suites in central London are in Belgravia, which has 12 cells, and West End Central, which has 28 cells.

The police heard how they & # 39; maximum capacity & # 39; had reached, which led to a break in arrests.

Activists also claimed that officers had told that cells & # 39; full & # 39; goods. Last night, the 204 who were arrested to protest at Waterloo Bridge were all in custody.

On Monday, many activists were surprised when the police were pleased that their demonstration went ahead. Despite the protest that destroyed the motorists, the first arrests were made only after the vandalism of Shell's headquarters.

Roger Hallam, one of the founders of Extinction Rebellion, said the group & # 39; four or five encounters & # 39; with the police before the protests began.

Scotland Yard Chief Inspector Colin Wingrove said: “We need to ensure that we find the right balance between allowing the right to peaceful protest and at the same time keeping the disruption of communities to a minimum.

& # 39; We have significant resources at our disposal to resolve any incidents and on-site officers who have been properly trained in maintaining public order. & # 39;

The mayor said that he & # 39; the passion & # 39; shared among those who protested against climate change and remained & # 39; a fervent supporter & # 39; of the right to peaceful protest, but said: "I am, however, very concerned about the plans that some protesters will have to make tomorrow on the London Underground.

& # 39; It is absolutely crucial to let more people use public transportation, as well as walking and cycling, if we want to tackle this climate disaster – and millions of Londoners depend on the underground network to manage their daily lives in our city .

& # 39; Targeting public transport in this way would only harm the cause of anyone who wants to tackle climate change and risk the safety of Londoners, and I would beg anyone thinking about doing this to think again & # 39;

The police have now banned Protestants from Waterloo Bridge for the rest of the week, but it is unclear how many people are staying there.

Earlier, a Metropolitan Police Service spokesperson said: “On Monday, April 15, at 6:55 pm, a 24-hour condition was imposed which stipulated that demonstrators at Waterloo Bridge should only continue demonstrations in the Marble Arch area.

& # 39; From 4:45 pm today, the same situation has been implemented as in the Oxford Circus area. Demonstrators are again advised to continue demonstrations in the Marble Arch area. & # 39;

Police said they had evidence that there was & # 39; serious disruption & # 39; was caused – including 55 closed bus routes and 500,000 people affected.

Approximately 122 people were arrested for the demonstrations of the rapid extinction at five locations in 24 hours, demonstrators using the slogan & # 39; this is an emergency & # 39; – but many commuters get angry at the disruption.

In stunning scenes, demonstrators of all ages were taken away by up to four officers while others clung to the sidewalk because they blocked important bus routes for a second day – forcing employees to walk to their subway stations.

Scotland Yard said that 500,000 people have been hit by the chaos, with now 55 bus routes and major delays on roads around Waterloo and Marble Arch, where police have asked protesters to meet.

On Waterloo Bridge, loud cheering, the ringing of the bells and the whistling of whistles were heard when protesters were arrested and taken to police vans – but many remained, shouted for climate justice and refused to move.

Members of the Extinction Rebellion group in Bristol, who participated in the protests in London, tweeted: & # 39; Escalation day one: swarms. The police arrest at Waterloo Bridge, south side. We have to overload them now! & # 39; They urged at least 30 people to & # 39; arrests & # 39; committing at Waterloo Bridge, without thinning out their other locations.

Demonstrations continued today for a possible fourteen days of action, with the scolding extinction spreading five locations in London, including Oxford Circus and Piccadilly Circus, held by up to 10,000 people.

Earlier in the day, police removed protesters from Waterloo Bridge after sending a message ordering them to disperse and meet again at Marble Arch if they wanted

Earlier in the day, police removed protesters from Waterloo Bridge after sending a message ordering them to disperse and meet again at Marble Arch if they wanted

Earlier in the day, police removed protesters from Waterloo Bridge after sending a message ordering them to disperse and meet again at Marble Arch if they wanted

Police officers take a climate change activist away from Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion in London today

Police officers take a climate change activist away from Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion in London today

Police officers take a climate change activist away from Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion in London today

Police officers carry activists while removing them from Waterloo Bridge on the second day of the afternoon's protest

Police officers carry activists while removing them from Waterloo Bridge on the second day of the afternoon's protest

A woman is taken from Waterloo Bridge by the police

A woman is taken from Waterloo Bridge by the police

Police officers carry activists while removing them from Waterloo Bridge on the second day of the afternoon's protest

Policemen assist an activist in removing her from the Waterloo Bridge blockade in today's environmental protest

Policemen assist an activist in removing her from the Waterloo Bridge blockade in today's environmental protest

Policemen assist an activist in removing her from the Waterloo Bridge blockade in today's environmental protest

Metropolitan Police officers carry an activist because they remove him from Waterloo Bridge during today's protests

Metropolitan Police officers carry an activist because they remove him from Waterloo Bridge during today's protests

Metropolitan Police officers carry an activist because they remove him from Waterloo Bridge during today's protests

Police officers are going to lift a climate change activist on Waterloo because they are taking her away from the protest today

Police officers are going to lift a climate change activist on Waterloo because they are taking her away from the protest today

Police officers are going to lift a climate change activist on Waterloo because they are taking her away from the protest today

Protesters are being taken from Waterloo Bridge during the second day of the extinction eradication protest today

Protesters are being taken from Waterloo Bridge during the second day of the extinction eradication protest today

A man raises his hand while being taken away by the police

A man raises his hand while being taken away by the police

Protesters are being taken from Waterloo Bridge during the second day of the extinction eradication protest today

A police officer removes an activist from the blockade on the Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against today's rebellion

A police officer removes an activist from the blockade on the Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against today's rebellion

A police officer removes an activist from the blockade on the Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against today's rebellion

The (very middle class) voices of the rebellion

Jane Augsburger, 54, from Stroud, Glos was arrested Monday for criminal damage outside Shell's headquarters

Jane Augsburger, 54, from Stroud, Glos was arrested Monday for criminal damage outside Shell's headquarters

Jane Augsburger, 54, from Stroud, Glos was arrested Monday for criminal damage outside Shell's headquarters

The rescuer: Jane Augsburger, 54, from Stroud, Gloucestershire, was one of those arrested for criminal damage outside Shell's headquarters on Monday. Photos & # 39; s show the mother-of-one kneeling down grinning and kneeling next to a smashed glass door at the front of the company's office building. The rescuer, a supporter of Jeremy Corbyn, previously lived in the Dordogne in a luxury house with a swimming pool.

The proud parent: Katerina Hasapopoulos, 40, hit Shell headquarters on Monday. Before her arrest, the mother-of-three said: “Shell is already responsible for destroying lives in places such as Nigeria. Shell only cares about profit and I have three beautiful young girls that I want to see grow up to have a future. & # 39; She previously participated in the Stroud City Council to ask questions about climate change.

The highway killer: Simon Bramwell, 46, also from Stroud, is a co-founder of Extinction Rebellion and a former builder. He was taken into a police bus after he had thrown himself at Shell's headquarters on Monday. He was part of a group of fanatics who brought the M4 to a halt by protesting plans to expand Heathrow in 2016. fewer birds convinced him to form an environmentally conscious environmental movement.

The jet dismantler: Angie Zelter, 76, was arrested yesterday and taken away Waterloo Bridge after refusing to give way. The veteran protester has been arrested more than 100 times around the world and describes himself as a & # 39; world citizen & # 39 ;. In 1996 she was part of a group that disarmed a BAE Hawk Jet, which prevented it from being exported to Indonesia.

The meter: Dr. Gail Bradbrook, 47, is described as & # 39; the meter & # 39; of extinction rebellion. She became an activist as a result of taking psychedelic drugs. Dr. Bradbrook, who has a PhD in molecular biophysics, said that drugs rewired her brain & # 39; and gave her & # 39; the codes of social change & # 39 ;. She holds & # 39; lunar circles & # 39; in a teepee, where she picks up feet.

The breast booster: Zack Polanski, a Green Party candidate for the London Assembly, once claimed that his hypnotherapy skills could help women grow larger breasts. He said: & # 39; It's so safe and cheaper than a odd job. & # 39;

The palace robber: Rowan Tilly, from Oxford, was one of the demonstrators who participated in an & # 39; anti-nuclear robbery & # 39; in Buckingham Palace in 1993. The furniture maker compared her civil disobedience with the actions of Gandhi, Martin Luther King and the suffragettes.

The organic farmer: Roger Hallam, 52, became interested in climate change in his forties when an organic farm he ran in Wales went bankrupt due to bad weather. He now wants to bring down & # 39; all the regimes in the world & # 39 ;, starting with Britain.

The actress: Laura Reeves, an actress and artistic director from London, previously lived in New York and worked for the United Nations. In her show roles, there are roles in advertisements for River Island and Nikuma Jewelery. She has also posted photos of vacations in Peru and at the Burning Man festival in Nevada, USA.

A demonstrator blocking the road on Waterloo Bridge together with others was taken into an ambulance when three police waves came in to make arrests. A witness said that a man had hit his head on a police bus and had fallen.

The acclaim went out when a number of others were dragged away and chants from & # 39; We are unstoppable, another world is possible & # 39; sounded. Then a small rave began and campaigners danced for the police and sang & # 39; the power to the people & # 39 ;.

Legal advisers with the bridge group flanked the arrested and told them not to talk to the police, but they urged Protestants to go to Marble Arch. The arrested were positioned next to the south side of the crossing.

Their personal information was collected before being led to police vans parked at the end of the bridge. Earlier, officers walked among the crowd of more than 400 across the bridge, warning that they could be arrested.

This followed a previous order imposed by Scotland Yard in the context of public order. However, Protestants connected arms, sang and tried to drown the police by giving instructions when the mass arrests started.

Scotland Yard had made 122 arrests today, most of them for violation of public order and obstruction of the highway. Although many children participate in the protests, all detainees were adults.

Two officers in yellow high jackets marched along Waterloo Bridge after the order to initiate the arrests. Eco-activists had parked a van over the bridge and planted dozens of trees & # 39 ;.

The only location allowed for the protest was Marble Arch, but activists still gathered on the bridge while many sat on the floor talking and singing songs. A mobile kitchen handed out vegetarian dishes to the demonstrators.

Many important routes in London are blocked by demonstrators, as can be seen on the map above

Many important routes in London are blocked by demonstrators, as can be seen on the map above

Many important routes in London are blocked by demonstrators, as can be seen on the map above

Police officers remove a climate change activist from Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against today's rebellion

Police officers remove a climate change activist from Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against today's rebellion

Police officers remove a climate change activist from Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against today's rebellion

When the police carried out the arrests on the bridge, they were confronted with protesters who refused to move

When the police carried out the arrests on the bridge, they were confronted with protesters who refused to move

The police started dragging people to police cars

The police started dragging people to police cars

When the police carried out the arrests on the bridge, they were confronted with protesters who refused to move and dragged people to police cars.

Environmental demonstrators of the Extinction Rebellion eradication campaign will be taken by the police this afternoon

Environmental demonstrators of the Extinction Rebellion eradication campaign will be taken by the police this afternoon

Environmental demonstrators of the Extinction Rebellion eradication campaign will be taken by the police this afternoon

Police officers are carrying an Waterloo Bridge activist this afternoon while protests continue at five landmarks in London

Police officers are carrying an Waterloo Bridge activist this afternoon while protests continue at five landmarks in London

Police officers are carrying an Waterloo Bridge activist this afternoon while protests continue at five landmarks in London

Protesters are sitting on Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion in London, while the police are trying to arrest people

Protesters are sitting on Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion in London, while the police are trying to arrest people

Protesters are sitting on Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion in London, while the police are trying to arrest people

Environment Agency says that climate change is a 10/10 threat – and the Brexit is not yet 1/10

Climate change is a bigger problem than Brexit because & # 39; it could literally kill us & # 39 ;, Environment Agency warned head Sir James Bevan yesterday.

He said that building a & # 39; broad coalition & # 39; against climate change can help heal a divided country.

In a speech to the charity organization Whitehall and Industry Group, he said: “You can worry about the Brexit if you want, but you'll worry about the wrong thing. If you rank the things that can literally kill us on a scale from one to ten, the Brexit is not even one. Climate change is a ten. & # 39;

Sir James added that there were similarities between Brexit and climate change in the sense that the time scales of both & # 39; uncertain & # 39; and & # 39; the consequences are highly disputed & # 39 ;.

Sir James, a career diplomat and former high commissioner for India, said the increase in greenhouse gases would lead to rising seas, extreme water shortages, floods, coastal erosion and droughts & # 39 ;.

The Environment Agency, with more than 11,000 employees, is the government-funded body responsible for the protection of air, water and soil quality and protection against flooding.

Some commuters supported the protests, but others were unimpressed. Karen Buckingham has posted a tweet: this really should not be allowed on a London road. So much disruption that I know is ok, but enough is enough. & # 39;

And Peter Newport tweeted Transport for London to say: & # 39; Another day of disruption with no one able to get a bus in central London. I agree with freedom of expression, but if I can't work, it costs me money. & # 39;

Chief Inspector Colin Wingrove of the Metropolitan Police said Tuesday afternoon: & # 39; Continuous demonstrations cause a serious disruption to public transportation, local businesses, and Londoners wanting to perform their daily activities.

& # 39; At the moment we have made a total of 122 arrests, five of which were punishable yesterday after a disruption outside the business premises and the remaining 117 were at Waterloo Bridge last night and early morning this morning. We have considerable resources at our disposal to resolve any incidents. & # 39;

Four activists chained and glued under a truck on Waterloo Bridge. The campaigners stepped under the truck with blankets and sleeping bags, where they say they will stay as long as possible.

Blythe Pepino, 34, of Hereford, said: “The goal is to maintain the disruption on the bridge to bring the government to the table and talk about the climate crisis.

& # 39; I think that over time we will be taken more seriously because we do not intend to leave. Legal marches come and go and there is not much action or reporting about it, civil disobedience is the only way to bring urgency. & # 39;

Ben Moss, 42, from Islington, North London, lent himself to the truck. He said: “We are in an extreme situation, we need to take action, this is my personal action on the moral issue of the climate crisis and ecological collapse.

& # 39; I want the government to do something. I have a week off, if more is needed, I can apologize, I am a director of a company, I work at a cooperative, but not everyone can do this. & # 39;

Roads remained tight over Westminster and the Hyde Park area, with Transport for London warning buses expected to remain in central London at a diversion or curtailment due to ongoing protest blocking roads.

Climate change activists are marching along Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebels in London today

Climate change activists are marching along Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebels in London today

Climate change activists are marching along Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebels in London today

Climate change lawyer and activist Farhana Yamin glues himself on the sidewalk outside the Shell building in London today

Climate change lawyer and activist Farhana Yamin glues himself on the sidewalk outside the Shell building in London today

Climate change lawyer and activist Farhana Yamin glues himself on the sidewalk outside the Shell building in London today

The police are on guard while protesters camp on the road during a climate protest at Oxford Circus in London today

The police are on guard while protesters camp on the road during a climate protest at Oxford Circus in London today

The police are on guard while protesters camp on the road during a climate protest at Oxford Circus in London today

An activist is waving a flag this morning on the porch that covers the entrance to the Shell Center in London's Waterloo

An activist is waving a flag this morning on the porch that covers the entrance to the Shell Center in London's Waterloo

An activist is waving a flag this morning on the porch that covers the entrance to the Shell Center in London's Waterloo

Climate change activists are sitting in a boat on the River Thames today during the dying rebellion protest in London

Climate change activists are sitting in a boat on the River Thames today during the dying rebellion protest in London

Climate change activists are sitting in a boat on the River Thames today during the dying rebellion protest in London

Protesters chain and glue themselves to a truck on Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion today

Protesters chain and glue themselves to a truck on Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion today

Protesters chain and glue themselves to a truck on Waterloo Bridge during the dying protest against rebellion today

Armed police officers walk this morning past the extinction uprising past Parliament Square in Westminster

Armed police officers walk this morning past the extinction uprising past Parliament Square in Westminster

Armed police officers walk this morning past the extinction uprising past Parliament Square in Westminster

Activists dance like hundreds of environmental activists from the extinction of extinction today occupying Marble Arch

Activists dance like hundreds of environmental activists from the extinction of extinction today occupying Marble Arch

Activists dance like hundreds of environmental activists from the extinction of extinction today occupying Marble Arch

A woman plays a wing on Oxford Street while people use pedal power to deliver electricity for the sound system today

A woman plays a wing on Oxford Street while people use pedal power to deliver electricity for the sound system today

A woman plays a wing on Oxford Street while people use pedal power to deliver electricity for the sound system today

A couple enjoy a moment together while hundreds of demonstrators of the Extinction Rebellion occupy Marble Arch today

A couple enjoy a moment together while hundreds of demonstrators of the Extinction Rebellion occupy Marble Arch today

A couple enjoy a moment together while hundreds of demonstrators of the Extinction Rebellion occupy Marble Arch today

A woman is playing a wing on Oxford Street while people use pedal power to deliver electricity for the sound system today

A woman is playing a wing on Oxford Street while people use pedal power to deliver electricity for the sound system today

A woman is playing a wing on Oxford Street while people use pedal power to deliver electricity for the sound system today

A group practices yoga in the & # 39; wellness tent & # 39; while hundreds of environmentalists occupy Marble Arch today

A group practices yoga in the & # 39; wellness tent & # 39; while hundreds of environmentalists occupy Marble Arch today

A group practices yoga in the & # 39; wellness tent & # 39; while hundreds of environmentalists occupy Marble Arch today

An array of solar panels provides power for telephone charging and sound systems on the Marble Arch protest site today

Een array met zonnepanelen biedt stroom voor telefoonoplaad- en geluidssystemen op de Marble Arch-protestsite vandaag

Een array met zonnepanelen biedt stroom voor telefoonoplaad- en geluidssystemen op de Marble Arch-protestsite vandaag

Honderden milieuactivisten van uitstervende uitroeiing bezetten Marble Arch vandaag na het opzetten van het kamp

Honderden milieuactivisten van uitstervende uitroeiing bezetten Marble Arch vandaag na het opzetten van het kamp

Honderden milieuactivisten van uitstervende uitroeiing bezetten Marble Arch vandaag na het opzetten van het kamp

Activisten houden modelinsecten zoals ze demonstreren op Waterloo Bridge tijdens het uitstervende rebellieprotest in Londen vandaag

Activisten houden modelinsecten zoals ze demonstreren op Waterloo Bridge tijdens het uitstervende rebellieprotest in Londen vandaag

Activisten houden modelinsecten zoals ze demonstreren op Waterloo Bridge tijdens het uitstervende rebellieprotest in Londen vandaag

Activisten zitten op de weg tussen de bomen terwijl ze het verkeer van de oversteek van de Waterloo Bridge in Londen vandaag blijven blokkeren

Activisten zitten op de weg tussen de bomen terwijl ze het verkeer van de oversteek van de Waterloo Bridge in Londen vandaag blijven blokkeren

Activisten zitten op de weg tussen de bomen terwijl ze het verkeer van de oversteek van de Waterloo Bridge in Londen vandaag blijven blokkeren

Een jonge vrouw danst voor Marble Arch terwijl honderden demonstranten van uitstervingsopstanden het gebied vandaag bezetten

Een jonge vrouw danst voor Marble Arch terwijl honderden demonstranten van uitstervingsopstanden het gebied vandaag bezetten

Een jonge vrouw danst voor Marble Arch terwijl honderden demonstranten van uitstervingsopstanden het gebied vandaag bezetten

Activisten van de klimaatverandering blokkeren een weg tijdens het protest tegen de opstand tegen rebellie op het Parliament Square in Londen vanmorgen

Activisten van de klimaatverandering blokkeren een weg tijdens het protest tegen de opstand tegen rebellie op het Parliament Square in Londen vanmorgen

Activisten van de klimaatverandering blokkeren een weg tijdens het protest tegen de opstand tegen rebellie op het Parliament Square in Londen vanmorgen

Activisten blokkeren een weg bij Marble Arch vanmorgen op de tweede dag van het protest van de groep Extinction Rebellion

Activisten blokkeren een weg bij Marble Arch vanmorgen op de tweede dag van het protest van de groep Extinction Rebellion

Activisten blokkeren een weg bij Marble Arch vanmorgen op de tweede dag van het protest van de groep Extinction Rebellion

Activisten schenken drankjes in de buurt van Marble Arch op de tweede dag van het protest door de groep Extinction Rebellion vandaag

Activisten schenken drankjes in de buurt van Marble Arch op de tweede dag van het protest door de groep Extinction Rebellion vandaag

Activisten schenken drankjes in de buurt van Marble Arch op de tweede dag van het protest door de groep Extinction Rebellion vandaag

Het protest gaat vandaag door in Oxford Circus met meer dan 110 mensen gearresteerd terwijl de politie de chaos aanpakt

Het protest gaat vandaag door in Oxford Circus met meer dan 110 mensen gearresteerd terwijl de politie de chaos aanpakt

Het protest gaat vandaag door in Oxford Circus met meer dan 110 mensen gearresteerd terwijl de politie de chaos aanpakt

De Met legde ook een voorwaarde op voor 24 uur voor demonstranten om zich alleen bij Marble Arch te verzamelen op grond van Sectie 14 van de Public Order Act 1986, door te zeggen dat er bewijsmateriaal nodig was dat er nu ernstige ontwrichting plaatsvond.

Phoenix Evans, zes maanden, met moeder Liberty Evans op het klimaatveranderingsprotest op Parliament Square vandaag

Phoenix Evans, zes maanden, met moeder Liberty Evans op het klimaatveranderingsprotest op Parliament Square vandaag

Phoenix Evans, zes maanden, met moeder Liberty Evans op het klimaatveranderingsprotest op Parliament Square vandaag

Een woordvoerder zei: De informatie en intelligentie die op dit moment beschikbaar zijn, betekent dat die Met voelt dat deze actie noodzakelijk is om te voorkomen dat de demonstraties een voortdurende ernstige verstoring van de gemeenschap veroorzaken. & # 39;

It came after environmental protesters blocked some of London's busiest roads and vandalised Shell's headquarters near Waterloo yesterday as they demanded action on climate change.

A pair of protesters were today still camped out on a glass balcony above the entrance to Shell. A woman and man could be seen hoisting food up from their fellow protesters as construction workers shout 'melts' at them.

One construction worker at the site next door branded the protest was a 'disgrace' and a 'waste of police time'.

She said: 'I live in East London where knife and gun crime are rife and police have to be here to babysit these guys. People my age are being killed and this is where the police are. I was at my local pub the other day and a guy drove straight into it.

'We could have been killed and it took police a half an hour to get there and when they came there were only two of them. I know climate change is a problem, but this is not the way to do it.'

Her co-worker, whose nephew was stabbed to death last year in London, agreed and said the protestors were 'not even being environmentally friendly'.

A woman drinks as others sleep in tents at a road block near Marble Arch this morning during the Extinction Rebellion protest

A woman drinks as others sleep in tents at a road block near Marble Arch this morning during the Extinction Rebellion protest

A woman drinks as others sleep in tents at a road block near Marble Arch this morning during the Extinction Rebellion protest

A climate change activist walks between tents during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch in London today

A climate change activist walks between tents during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch in London today

A climate change activist walks between tents during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch in London today

Demonstrators stand in the road during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch which is continuing this morning

Demonstrators stand in the road during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch which is continuing this morning

Demonstrators stand in the road during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch which is continuing this morning

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London today, as more than 100 people have been arrested

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London today, as more than 100 people have been arrested

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London today, as more than 100 people have been arrested

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping at Oxford Circus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping at Oxford Circus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping at Oxford Circus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Police stand next to Extinction Rebellion demonstrators as the protest continues at Marble Arch in London today

Police stand next to Extinction Rebellion demonstrators as the protest continues at Marble Arch in London today

Police stand next to Extinction Rebellion demonstrators as the protest continues at Marble Arch in London today

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping near Marble Arch on the second day of the environmental protest today

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping near Marble Arch on the second day of the environmental protest today

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping near Marble Arch on the second day of the environmental protest today

A man emerges from his tent as a new day begins during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch today

A man emerges from his tent as a new day begins during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch today

A man emerges from his tent as a new day begins during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch today

Commuters cycle past a pink boat placed in the road at Oxford Circus by activists as part of the Extinction Rebellion protest

Commuters cycle past a pink boat placed in the road at Oxford Circus by activists as part of the Extinction Rebellion protest

Commuters cycle past a pink boat placed in the road at Oxford Circus by activists as part of the Extinction Rebellion protest

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London today as the protests continue this morning

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London today as the protests continue this morning

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London today as the protests continue this morning

He said: 'Look at that spray paint they've used, what impact does that have on the Ozone layer? They are drinking from plastic bottles up there, they have black bin bags – do they not have jobs to go to?'

Another construction worker, Kyle, said: 'I think it's bull – it's supposed to be a peaceful protest and they destroyed the building.'

Humans have declared war on nature, says former Archbishop of Canterbury

Humans have declared war on nature and put progress before the planet, the former Archbishop of Canterbury said on the eve of environmental protests aimed at bringing London to a standstill.

Dr Rowan Williams said the world is in a crisis which could be called 'being at war with ourselves'.

He spoke at a meditation event outside St Paul's Cathedral in the capital attended by activists preparing to take part in mass demonstrations organised by the Extinction Rebellion group.

Sitting on the ground amid protesters who held flags and banners, he said: 'We have declared war on our nature when we declare war on the natural world. We are at war with ourselves when we are at war with our neighbour, whether that neighbour is human or non-human.

'We are here tonight to declare that we do not wish to be at war. We wish to make peace with ourselves by making peace with our neighbour earth and with our God.'

Praying at the all-faith gathering, he added: 'We confess that we have polluted our own atmosphere, causing global warming and climate change that have increased poverty in many parts of our planet. We have contributed to crises and been more concerned with getting gold than keeping our planet green. We have loved progress more than the planet. We are sorry.'

Extinction Rebellion, which describes itself as a non-violent direct action and civil disobedience group, said the protests at major central London locations including Parliament Square and Oxford Circus from Monday 'will be bringing London to a standstill for up to two weeks'.

Brian Sweeney, 42, said: 'They've left rubbish everywhere – the mess they've made and they are meant to be looking after the environment. And also they are just picking on one corporation – that's not the way to do it, this is a global issue.'

Thousands of people gathered at five central London locations in a bid to bring the capital to a standstill.

Some activists glued themselves to windows and smashed glass revolving doors at Shell's HQ near Waterloo, while others climbed the building to spray graffiti and hang banners.

Simon Bramwell 47, from Stroud in Gloucestershire, an ex-builder and co-founder of Extinction Rebellion, said he glued himself to the building to 'prevent crimes against humanity'.

Katerina Hasapopoulos, a mother-of-three from Stroud, also glued herself to the front of the building and declared: 'Shell cares only for profit and I have three beautiful young girls who I want to see grow up to have a future.'

Campaign group Extinction Rebellion said it aimed to cause more than £6,000 of damage so they could be tried by a jury in Crown Court. Police said three men and two women were arrested on suspicion of criminal damage.

Elsewhere skateboarders replaced cars and lorries on Waterloo Bridge as the Thames crossing was closed to traffic and decorated with pot plants and trees.

One officer said it had been 'very peaceful' and the protesters had been 'really pleasant'.

A bright pink boat became the focus for hundreds of activists stopping traffic at Oxford Circus, where some used makeshift devices to lock their arms together.

Roads were also closed and drivers diverted around Marble Arch and Piccadilly Circus. At Parliament Square, people unfurled banners, held up placards and waved flags as speakers took to the stage.

London's protests were part of a wider campaign which will see people in at least 80 cities in more than 33 countries hold similar demonstrations on environmental issues, campaigners said.

Organisers said: 'The International Rebellion begins and Extinction Rebellion will be bringing London to a standstill for up to two weeks.

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators dance at the campsite near Marble Arch in London this morning

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators dance at the campsite near Marble Arch in London this morning

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators dance at the campsite near Marble Arch in London this morning

Activists hold banners and wave flags as they continue to block Waterloo Bridge in the environmental protest today

Activists hold banners and wave flags as they continue to block Waterloo Bridge in the environmental protest today

Activists hold banners and wave flags as they continue to block Waterloo Bridge in the environmental protest today

Demonstrators chain and glue themselves to a lorry on Waterloo Bridge during the Extinction Rebellion protest today

Demonstrators chain and glue themselves to a lorry on Waterloo Bridge during the Extinction Rebellion protest today

Demonstrators chain and glue themselves to a lorry on Waterloo Bridge during the Extinction Rebellion protest today

Climate change activists sit on the road during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch in London this morning

Climate change activists sit on the road during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch in London this morning

Climate change activists sit on the road during the Extinction Rebellion protest at Marble Arch in London this morning

Activists are trying to block five central locations - including Waterloo Bridge, pictured today - as part of their protest

Activists are trying to block five central locations - including Waterloo Bridge, pictured today - as part of their protest

Activists are trying to block five central locations – including Waterloo Bridge, pictured today – as part of their protest

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping at Oxford Circus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping at Oxford Circus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Activists sit with their tents in the road after sleeping at Oxford Circus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Police officers stand at a cordon at a closed road at Oxford Cirus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Police officers stand at a cordon at a closed road at Oxford Cirus on the second day of the environmental protest today

Police officers stand at a cordon at a closed road at Oxford Cirus on the second day of the environmental protest today

An activist brushes his teeth after waking up near Marble Arch in London during the environmental protest this morning

An activist brushes his teeth after waking up near Marble Arch in London during the environmental protest this morning

An activist brushes his teeth after waking up near Marble Arch in London during the environmental protest this morning

Activists sit with their tents in the road near Marble Arch on the second day of the environmental protest this morning

Activists sit with their tents in the road near Marble Arch on the second day of the environmental protest this morning

Activists sit with their tents in the road near Marble Arch on the second day of the environmental protest this morning

Activists stand next to their tents in Marble Arch as the Extinction Rebellion demonstrations continue this morning

Activists stand next to their tents in Marble Arch as the Extinction Rebellion demonstrations continue this morning

Activists stand next to their tents in Marble Arch as the Extinction Rebellion demonstrations continue this morning

Activists block the road near Marble Arch today as Extinction Rebellion try to raise more awareness of climate change

Activists block the road near Marble Arch today as Extinction Rebellion try to raise more awareness of climate change

Activists block the road near Marble Arch today as Extinction Rebellion try to raise more awareness of climate change

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London as the climate change protests continue today

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London as the climate change protests continue today

Extinction Rebellion demonstrators camp near Marble Arch in London as the climate change protests continue today

Police intervene to remove protesters from the Extinction Rebellion demonstration at Waterloo Bridge overnight

Police intervene to remove protesters from the Extinction Rebellion demonstration at Waterloo Bridge overnight

Police intervene to remove protesters from the Extinction Rebellion demonstration at Waterloo Bridge overnight

A woman smiles as police arrest her at the Extinction Rebellion climate change protest on Waterloo Bridge yesterday

A woman smiles as police arrest her at the Extinction Rebellion climate change protest on Waterloo Bridge yesterday

A woman smiles as police arrest her at the Extinction Rebellion climate change protest on Waterloo Bridge yesterday

A demonstrator is carried away from the Extinction Rebellion climate change protest on Waterloo Bridge yesterday

A demonstrator is carried away from the Extinction Rebellion climate change protest on Waterloo Bridge yesterday

A demonstrator is carried away from the Extinction Rebellion climate change protest on Waterloo Bridge yesterday

'They will be blocking five of the city's busiest and most iconic locations in a non-violent, peaceful act of rebellion where they invite people to join them for several days of creative, artist-led resistance.'

The movement has received support from actress and activist Dame Emma Thompson and former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams.

Speaking at a meditation on the eve of the protests, Dr Williams said humans had declared war on nature.

He said: 'We are here tonight to declare that we do not wish to be at war. We wish to make peace with ourselves by making peace with our neighbour Earth and with our God.'

Scotland Yard said it had 'appropriate policing plans' for the demonstrations and officers would be used from across the force 'to support the public order operation during the coming weeks'.

Police advised people travelling around London in the coming days to allow extra time for their journey in the event of road closures and general disruption

The faces behind the climate change chaos: From the 'neo-pagan' mother who became an activist after taking psychedelic drugs, to failed organic farmer and a baronet's granddaughter

The activists behind the chaos caused by climate change protests this week come from all walks of life – including a failed organic farmer and a baronet's daughter.

Co-founder Simon Bramwell is a former builder who was taken away in a police van yesterday after supergluing himself to the glass door of the Shell HQ in London.

His removal came as 113 people were arrested in the capital by police dealing with the ongoing protests at five landmarks including Waterloo Bridge and Marble Arch.

Also leading the 'XR' group is Gail Bradbrook, a 'neo-pagan' who became an activist as a direct result of taking huge doses of two powerful psychedelic drugs.

Others involved include Tasmin Osmond, who is the granddaughter of baronet Sir Thomas Lees, veteran campaigner Roger Hallam, and ex-UN worker Laura Reeves.

King's post-graduate student George Barda and Stuart Basden, who says prison is like 'boarding school', are also involved in the demonstration of up to 10,000 people.

Here is more about those involved in the protest which is now in its second day:

Simon Bramwell was taken away in a police van after supergluing himself to the glass door of the Shell HQ in London

Simon Bramwell was taken away in a police van after supergluing himself to the glass door of the Shell HQ in London

One of the directors of private limited company Compassionate Revolution, which has organised and partly financed XR, is Wiltshire mother Gail Bradbrook

One of the directors of private limited company Compassionate Revolution, which has organised and partly financed XR, is Wiltshire mother Gail Bradbrook

Simon Bramwell (left) was taken away in a police van after supergluing himself to the glass door of the Shell HQ in London yesterday. One of the directors of private limited company Compassionate Revolution, which has partly financed XR, is mother Gail Bradbrook (right)

Simon Bramwell, who was seen shouting as he was held by police yesterday, is a co-founder of Extinction Rebellion from Stroud, Gloucestershire, and a former builder.

The 46-year-old was part of a 12-strong group of middle class fanatics who admitted bringing the M4 and A4 to a standstill by lying down on a stretch of the motorway.

He was sentenced in 2016 over the protest against the expansion of Heathrow. He has been repeatedly arrested for climate change and anti-fracking protests.

The bush craft instructor says 'hearing less birds in our beautiful countryside' – where he goes off the grid for up to 19 days at a time – convinced him to help form 'XR'.

He wanted a 'punchier' eco-movement where people were willing to be arrested to be heard instead of just 'playing it safe' and failing to get their message across.

Mr Bramwell glued himself to the Shell HQ glass door as part of the protests yesterday

One of the directors of private limited company Compassionate Revolution, which has organised and partly financed XR, is Wiltshire mother Gail Bradbrook, 47.

The 'neo-pagan' said on a recent podcast that she decided to become an activist as a direct result of taking huge doses of two powerful psychedelic drugs.

Ms Bradbrook, who has two sons aged ten and 13, flew to Costa Rica a few years ago to take a dose of ibogaine, a hallucinogenic shrub growing in West Africa.

The mother, who has a PhD in molecular biophysics, also tried ayahuasca, a highly toxic, mind-bending potion made by Amazon jungle shamans.

She said the drugs 'rewired' her brain and gave her 'the codes of social change'. Afterwards, she ended her marriage and began her activism in XR.

Dr Bradbrook appeared on ITV's Good Morning Britain where she told of fears for her children

Dr Bradbrook appeared on ITV's Good Morning Britain where she told of fears for her children

Dr Bradbrook appeared on ITV's Good Morning Britain where she told of fears for her children

Within XR, she holds mystic 'moon circles' with female colleagues inside a tepee, at which they ingest another 'natural' drug, mugwort, used by ancient Celts.

Ms Bradbrook has warned that warming in the Arctic is likely to cause 'the collapse of the food system' in just three years – a belief no scientist would endorse.

She has also said she 'does not condemn' protesters who 'choose to damage property in order to protect nature', although she personally prefers non-violence.

Speaking on ITV today, she looked close to tears as she spoke emotionally about the impact of climate change and fears her children would be left with nothing to eat.

She told of Sir David Attenborough's fears over civilisation, but Good Morning Britain host Richard Madeley interrupted her to say he is 'not a saint, just a broadcaster'.

Tasmin Osmond, 35, is a veteran of ¿direct actions¿

Tasmin Osmond, 35, is a veteran of ¿direct actions¿

The most prominent ¿ and radical ¿ of the XR leaders is failed organic farmer and PhD student Roger Hallam

The most prominent ¿ and radical ¿ of the XR leaders is failed organic farmer and PhD student Roger Hallam

Tasmin Osmond (left), 35, is a veteran of 'direct actions', while Roger Hallam (right), 52, is a veteran demonstrator who is researching a PhD in effective radical campaigning

Also involved is Tasmin Osmond, 35, a veteran of 'direct actions' such as Occupy London, the poverty protest which set up a camp outside St Paul's cathedral in 2011.

Who are Extinction Rebellion and how are they funded?

Extinction Rebellion grew out of the activist group 'Rising Up!' which unsuccessfully tried to stop the expansion of Heathrow Airport.

Established in Britain in May 2018, the group has been organised and partly financed by a private limited company called Compassionate Revolution.

Its financial support comes from philanthropic foundations and crowdfunding – with an online campaign having raised £166,000 since launching in October.

XR now has more than 100 groups across Britain alone, with up to 10,000 supporters drawn to the protests in London this week.

It has groups in dozens of countries including South Africa, India and even the Solomon Islands – with the latest campaign involving people in at least 80 cities in more than 33 countries.

Last November, the group held a protest which blocked bridges across London to bring chaos to the capital.

In February, they took part in a UK-wide school strike and on April 1, during one of the Brexit debates, a group of their protesters stripped off in the House of Commons.

The granddaughter of Dorset baronet Sir Thomas Lees, Omond went to Westminster School and Trinity College, Cambridge, where she read English.

Ms Osmond was thrown out of anti-aviation group Plane Stupid after saying the green movement 'brand' was 'unwashed, unshaven and up a tree'.

Another of the founders of Extinction Rebellion is Roger Hallam, 52, a veteran demonstrator who is researching a PhD in effective radical campaigning.

He became interested in climate change in his 40s when an organic farm he ran in Wales went bankrupt because of extreme weather conditions.

Mr Hallam went on hunger strike in 2017 to demand King's College London stop investing in fossil fuels.

His stated ambition for the group is to 'bring down all the regimes in the world and replace them', starting with Britain.

In a recent video on YouTube, he said protesters should be ready to cause disruption through personal 'sacrifice'. If necessary, they 'should be willing to die'.

Mr Hallam said in the past: 'You need about 400 to go to prison and you need two to three thousand people to get arrested.'

But yesterday, he insisted: 'No-one wants to get arrested. I want to get back to my farm. I'm just a poor farmer, nothing special.'

He added: 'We aren't throwing stones or shouting. People are coming in to central London and sitting down. We are causing disruption and it's justified.'

Mr Hallam has also claimed paralysing traffic will eventually cause food shortages and trigger uprisings.

XR co-founder Stuart Basden, 36, a middle-class writer from Bristol

XR co-founder Stuart Basden, 36, a middle-class writer from Bristol

George Barda, 43, believes the 'Criminal UK Government' is to blame for climate change

George Barda, 43, believes the 'Criminal UK Government' is to blame for climate change

XR co-founder Stuart Basden (left), 36, a middle-class writer from Bristol, while George Barda (right), 43, believes the 'Criminal UK Government' is to blame for climate change

Also involved in the group is 43-year-old George Barda, who believes the 'Criminal UK Government' is to blame for climate change.

He is a post-graduate student at King's College in London and the son of classical music and stage photographer Clive Barda.

But Mr Barda is also a dedicated revolutionary who camped outside St Paul's cathedral in the Occupy London campaign.

Today, he is a director of XR parent company Compassionate Revolution and regularly appears on Russia Today, Russia's controversial British TV channel.

Meanwhile XR co-founder Stuart Basden, 36, a middle-class writer from Bristol, has goals that go far beyond a desire to curb global warming.

Mr Basden has claimed: 'The climate's breakdown is a symptom of a toxic system that has infected the ways we relate to each other as humans and to all life.'

He has urged XR followers to embrace jail, where he spent a week after defacing London's City Hall with spray paint last year, saying it is 'a bit like boarding school'.

Commuters cycle today past a pink boat placed in the road at Oxford Circus by activists

Commuters cycle today past a pink boat placed in the road at Oxford Circus by activists

Commuters cycle today past a pink boat placed in the road at Oxford Circus by activists

Laura Reeves is also involved in the protest group after she was left feeling 'deflated' by 'office activism' having worked for NGOs including the United Nations.

The actress and artistic director took to the stage at Marble Arch yesterday to address hundreds of activists. She describes herself as a 'vision holder' for XR.

Miss Reeves, whose online show reel lists roles in commercials for River Island and Nikuma Jewellery, has previously lived in New York but is now based in London.

She flaunts photos of holidays in far flung destinations such as Peru and the Burning Man festival in Nevada on social media, despite the damage caused by air travel.

She said: 'This just isn't a priority for the government but this is literally a matter of life and death, there will be no future unless drastic steps are taken.

'Half of life, half the world's species, has become extinct since the 1970s. The government needs to declare a climate emergency.'

Miss Reeves urged members of the crowd to put their heads together and discuss ways in which they could help make their message resonate.

'We have got to come together or we will become extinct,' she said 'People are now starting to wake up. How can anything be more important than life on Earth?'

Who are Extinction Rebellion and what do the protesters want?

Extinction Rebellion has emerged as the premier protest movement for climate change activists.

Since its first demonstration last year the group has injected fresh energy into the environmental cause, capturing headlines, recruits and high-profile supporters.

It has grown into an international movement backed by celebrities, academics and writers, calling for 'radical change in order to minimise the risk of human extinction and ecological collapse'.

– What does the group want?

Extinction Rebellion (XR) says direct action is needed to force governments to act urgently on climate change and wildlife declines and halt a 'sixth mass extinction'.

It is calling for an ecological emergency to be declared, greenhouse gases to be brought to net zero by 2025, and the creation of a citizens' assembly to lead action on the environment.

XR says the systems propping up 'modern consumer-focused lifestyles' will lead to mass water shortages, crop failures, sea level rises and the displacement of millions.

'Only a peaceful planet-wide mobilisation of the scale of the Second World War will give us a chance to avoid the worst-case scenarios,' it says.

– What are its methods?

XR uses what is calls 'non-violent civil disobedience' as the world has 'run out of the luxury of time to react incrementally'.

Examples include blocking busy roads and bridges, spray-painting government buildings and activists chaining and gluing themselves to buildings including the gates of Buckingham Palace.

A colourful catwalk show took over London's busy Oxford Circus junction earlier this month to highlight the environmental impact of the fashion industry.

Before that, semi-naked activists glued themselves to windows in the public gallery of the House of Commons during a Brexit debate.

On Monday, protesters vandalised Shell's headquarters, gluing themselves to windows and smashing glass revolving doors in a bid to cause more than £6,000 of damage – to enable them to have a jury trial in Crown Court.

A day later, around two dozen protesters occupied the International Criminal Court in the Hague, in the Netherlands, in a bid to have ecocide recognised as an international crime, the group said.

XR says it wants ecocide, the deliberate destruction of the natural environment, to be listed alongside crimes against humanity, war crimes, genocide and crimes of aggression.

– How did it build momentum?

In its first protest on October 31 last year, the group assembled a protest on Parliament Square in London, expecting a 'couple of hundred people' – before 1,500 showed up.

The group said: 'The energy was contagious! The next few weeks were a whirlwind.

'Six thousand of us converged on London to peacefully block five major bridges across the Thames.'

Chapters now exist in dozens of countries including the US, the Solomon Islands, Australia, Spain, South Africa and India, it said.

On April 15 protests in London began, with campaigners saying they will bring the capital to a standstill for up to two weeks.

Activists in at least 80 cities in more than 33 countries will hold similar demonstrations on environmental issues, campaigners said.

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