Liz Cheney Supports Pelosi, Says McCarthy Isn’t Fit to Be a Speaker

Republican Representative Liz Cheney on Wednesday supported Chair Nancy Pelosi’s decision to dismiss two GOP members from the committee investigating the Jan. 6 riots on Capitol Hill.

“I agree with what the Speaker has done,” she told reporters on Capitol Hill. Pelosi named Cheney to the panel last month.

Cheney also criticized McCarthy, saying he shouldn’t be a speaker if Republicans win control of the House in next year’s midterm elections, arguing he didn’t qualify to run third in line for the presidency. end.

“Anyone who would finish third in line for the presidency must demonstrate a commitment to the Constitution and to the rule of law, and minority leader McCarthy has not,” she said.

“The rhetoric we’ve heard from the minority leader is unfair,” she said. “On every occasion, the minority leader has tried to prevent the American people from understanding what happened.”

“I am absolutely certain that we will have an impartial investigation,” she added.

Republican Rep. Liz Cheney supported Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s decision to dismiss two GOP members from the committee investigating the Jan. 6 riots

Speaker Nancy Pelosic

House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy

Republican Representative Liz Cheney supported Speaker Nancy Pelosi (left) and criticized House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy (right) as ill-suited to serve as third in line for the presidency if Republicans win back the House in the 2022 midterms

Cheney was removed from the House leadership after criticizing Donald Trump for his role in encouraging the January 6 MAGA rioters. She was one of ten House Republicans to vote for his second impeachment trial.

Trump has repeatedly attacked her, encouraging her to face a primary challenge in her Wyoming House seat.

Pelosi on Wednesday banned Republican congressmen Jim Banks and Jim Jordan, both of Trump’s strong allies, from serving on The House Select Committee to investigate the January 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Both men voted to challenge the certification of President Joe Biden’s election victory and have promoted the “big lie” — the false argument that Trump actually won in 2020 and was the victim of electoral fraud.

Pelosi listed Cheney as one of her picks for the panel, allowing her to label it bipartisan even if Republicans objected to its creation.

McCarthy, meanwhile, reacted furiously, pulling all five of his nominees to the special committee investigating the January 6 MAGA uprising after Pelosi rejected Banks and Jordan.

McCarthy accused Pelosi of “playing politics” and creating a “mock trial” with her decision.

Pelosi said in a statement that she made her decision based on the “integrity” of the investigation. as a speaker, Pelosi has the final say on who is on the panel.

“With respect for the integrity of the investigation, with an emphasis on truth, and with concern for statements and actions by these members, I must reject the recommendations of representatives Banks and Jordan to the Select Committee,” Pelosi said in a statement. .

“The unprecedented nature of January 6 requires this unprecedented decision,” she added.

McCarthy criticized Pelosi for her decision.

‘Why do you let a lame duck speaker destroy this institution? This is the house of the people. Not Pelosi’s house,” he said in a hastily arranged press conference on Capitol Hill.

Pelosi is not a slack duck. For that to happen, Republicans would need to secure a majority in the 2022 election.

McCarthy promised to conduct his own investigation, which he said would look into Trump’s role in the Jan. 6 riots, where the former president’s supporters stormed the Capitol to disrupt the certification of Biden’s presidential victory.

“This represents a blatant abuse of power and will irreparably damage this institution,” McCarthy said in a statement making Pelosi’s move, saying it showed that “this panel has lost all legitimacy and credibility and shows that the chairman is more interested.” in playing politics than in seeking the truth.’

The House Select Committee to investigate the January 6 attack on the US Capitol investigation was expected to be highly controversial. The panel will hold its first hearing in six days on Tuesday, July 27.

Speaker Pelosi objected to the inclusion of Republican Congressmen Jim Banks (left) and Jim Jordan (center), both strong allies of former President Donald Trump, on the committee investigating the January 6 riots;  seen with House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy in the Capitol

Speaker Pelosi objected to the inclusion of Republican Congressmen Jim Banks (left) and Jim Jordan (center), both strong allies of former President Donald Trump, on the committee investigating the January 6 riots; seen with House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy in the Capitol

Democrats pushed for the creation of a 9/11-style commission to investigate Jan. 6, but that was blocked by Republicans;  Instead, the House formed a 1/6 select committee to investigate the Capitol riots (pictured)

Democrats pushed for the creation of a 9/11-style commission to investigate Jan. 6, but that was blocked by Republicans; Instead, the House formed a 1/6 select committee to investigate the Capitol riots (pictured)

But Pelosi’s rejection of two of the opposing sides’ choices is unprecedented. Leaders of the respective parties generally respect each other’s decisions.

“We need a comprehensive investigation into who staged this attack, who paid for it, how they nearly managed to overthrow a presidential election, why they did it and how we need to organize to prevent something like this from ever happening again.” ‘, she said. said in her statement.

The White House supported Pelosi’s move.

“The President has made it clear that the shameful events of January 6 deserve a full, independent and transparent investigation to ensure that nothing like this ever happens again, and he has full confidence in the President’s ability to lead that work.” said Biden spokesman Michael Gwin. said in a statement.

Republicans opposed Pelosi’s original call for a 9/11-style bipartisan committee. McCarthy opposed it in the House where it passed with Democratic support. But the bill died in the Senate when Senate Leader Mitch McConnell announced he would not support it.

Republicans wanted the committee to be broader in scope — studying not just what happened on January 6, but other acts of so-called “political violence,” including last summer’s Black Lives Matter protests.

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