Liz Cheney spent $58,500 on security, got Capitol police records after she voted to impeach Trump

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REVEALED: Liz Cheney spent $58,500 on additional personal security and got a Capitol police detail after she voted to impeach Trump

  • Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney massively increased security spending from next to nothing to $58,500 in Q1 2021 after voting to impeach Trump
  • Federal Election Commission documents show that Cheney’s campaign spent $22,500 on Command Executive Services security
  • The rest of the money went to three different former Secret Service agents
  • Cheney was the top Republican to vote for Trump’s second impeachment for ‘inciting insurrection’ after the Jan. 6 Capitol attack
  • She was voted out as chair of the GOP conference last month

Liz Cheney spent nearly $60,000 on security after her vote to impeach Donald Trump in January — and was also assigned a security detail from Congress.

The Wyoming representative and recently ousted chairman of the Republican Conference previously spent little to nothing on security, but spent $58,500 on the effort from late January to early March. according to the filings of the Federal Election Commission for the first quarter of 2021.

Two weeks after Cheney became the top Republican to vote to impeach Trump, her campaign spent $22,500 on security firm Command Executive Services.

The remaining $36,000 went toward security costs for three former Secret Service agents for that quarter.

The new focus on security is a break from Cheney’s previous releases. During the first quarter of non-election years, Cheney did not spend money on security services, according to FEC files.

Combining her last three House campaigns, she spent less than $2,000 in total on security.

Wyoming Representative Liz Cheney massively increased her security spending from next to nothing to $58,500 in the first quarter of 2021 after voting to impeach Donald Trump

Wyoming Representative Liz Cheney massively increased her security spending from next to nothing to $58,500 in the first quarter of 2021 after voting to impeach Donald Trump

Federal Election Commission records show that Cheney's campaign spent $22,000 on Command Executive Services security — the rest went to three different former Secret Service agents

Federal Election Commission records show that Cheney's campaign spent $22,000 on Command Executive Services security — the rest went to three different former Secret Service agents

Federal Election Commission records show that Cheney’s campaign spent $22,000 on Command Executive Services security — the rest went to three different former Secret Service agents

Capitol Police confirmed to Wyoming-based newspaper Casper Star Tribune krant that their general representative has received a security detail from their office, which is unusual for members of Congress.

“We don’t comment on security,” Jeremy Adler, communications director at Cheney, told the paper.

Cheney, who was the third Republican in the House at the time, voted to impeach Trump for inciting insurgency during his second impeachment trial in January 2021. She sided with Democrats and nine other Republicans, who felt Trump’s rhetoric led to the attack on the Capitol on January 6.

Trump was eventually acquitted for a second time in the then Republican-controlled Senate.

“There are definitely people who are angry, and I don’t mean aggressively angry, but angry at my voice,” Cheney told the Star-Tribune.

While visiting the office, the Star-Tribune noted that Cheney had a noticeably heavier security detail than in the past.

Other lawmakers who ramped up security spending after the attack include Senators Mitt Romney of Utah, Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania and Representatives Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Eric Swalwell of California.

They all individually spent between $40,000 and $70,000 of their campaign money on personal security or home security.

Cheney was voted out as chairman of the GOP conference last month for continuing to break with Trump and refusing to support his claims of widespread voter fraud. She was replaced by New York Representative Elise Stefanik, who, while voting less conservatively, supports Trump and his claims of “rigged” elections.

She said her new mission is to make sure Trump does not return to the Oval Office, as he will almost certainly seek a new term in 2024.

Cheney was added to the first-ever Forbes ’50 Over 50′ list, where one of her most significant achievements was listed as “The former vice president’s daughter has quickly become known nationally as her party’s most outspoken critic of former President Trump.” . .’

Cheney was the highest-ranking Republican to vote to impeach Trump for “inciting insurgency” after the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol. She was then voted out as chair of the GOP conference last month

Wyoming Republicans want to oust Cheney from her big seat, on top of her losing leadership within her caucus in the House.

Several GOP competitors have already made primary bids.

Cheney’s campaign costs are generally much higher than in previous first quarters in non-election years. In the first quarter of 2019, the campaign had 69 issues, 31 in 2017 and none in 2015, as it only entered its first campaign in January 2016.

The 2022 House race in the state is expected to be much more competitive than usual.

An indication of that is last month when Cheney made several campaign stops in at least six cities in Wyoming.

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