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Tied up: A young pig is placed in a car seat during a crash test in China, where researchers used the animals to imitate six-year-old children

Live pigs are used as dummies for crash tests and killed in & # 39; cruel & # 39; s 30 MPH simulations in China, which generate anger from animal rights groups

  • Seven immature pigs were killed this year in high-speed simulations for a study
  • The animals suffered fatal injuries, including cracks and internal bruises
  • General Motors stopped using animals for testing in the United States in the 1990s
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Animal rights organizations reacted furiously after it turned out that researchers in China use live pigs as dummies for crash tests.

Fifteen immature pigs were tied up for super fast simulations in a study in which seven of them were killed.

The animals did not receive food and water for hours for the tests and suffered a series of injuries, including bleeding, cracks and internal bruises.

Pigs and other animals were previously used in crash tests in the United States, but the practice was discontinued in the 1990s.

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Tied up: A young pig is placed in a car seat during a crash test in China, where researchers used the animals to imitate six-year-old children

Tied up: A young pig is placed in a car seat during a crash test in China, where researchers used the animals to imitate six-year-old children

Fifteen immature pigs were tied up for super fast simulations in a study in which seven of them were killed

Fifteen immature pigs were tied up for super fast simulations in a study in which seven of them were killed

The animals received no food and water hours before the tests and suffered a series of injuries, including bleeding, cracks and internal bruises

The animals received no food and water hours before the tests and suffered a series of injuries, including bleeding, cracks and internal bruises

Subjects: 15 immature pigs (two of which are shown above) were tied up for super fast simulations in a study in China where seven of them were killed

Speak to German newspaper Bild, PETA spokeswoman Anne Meinert focused on what she considered a & # 39; cruel & # 39; practice.

& # 39; Making intelligent and sensitive animals like pigs hit walls in high-speed tests is just cruel & # 39 ;, she said.

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& # 39; It leads to broken bones, internal bruises, cuts and terrible deaths. & # 39;

Renate K√ľnast of the German Green Party told the newspaper that companies who were genuinely interested in protecting children would use advanced dummies for crash tests instead of pigs.

The researchers justified the use of immature pigs by saying that their anatomical structure is & # 39; similar & # 39; was with that of human children.

The pigs were meant to mimic & # 39; six year old children & # 39 ;, they explained in the International Journal of Crashworthiness.

The scientists insisted that they had followed American guidelines for the use of laboratory animals and said their research had been approved by an ethics committee.

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In the experiment, fifteen immature pigs were tied with different types of safety belts and subjected to high speed tests up to 30 km / h.

Impact: One of the pigs is hurled forward by the simulated crash in a research experiment in China that has denounced groups of animal rights as & # 39; cruel & # 39;

Impact: One of the pigs is hurled forward by the simulated crash in a research experiment in China that has denounced groups of animal rights as & # 39; cruel & # 39;

Impact: One of the pigs is hurled forward by the simulated crash in a research experiment in China that has denounced groups of animal rights as & # 39; cruel & # 39;

Testing: These black-and-white images show two of the pigs during the crash tests in China, which researchers said they were meant to help develop belts for children

Testing: These black-and-white images show two of the pigs during the crash tests in China, which researchers said they were meant to help develop belts for children

Testing: These black-and-white images show two of the pigs during the crash tests in China, which researchers said they were meant to help develop belts for children

Testing: These black-and-white images show two of the pigs during the crash tests in China, which researchers said they were meant to help develop belts for children

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Testing: These black-and-white images show two of the pigs during the crash tests in China, which researchers said they were meant to help develop belts for children

The animals were placed on a chair mounted on a sled and beaten against a wall.

The pigs were between 70 and 80 days old and received no food 24 hours before the experiment.

They were also denied water for six hours in advance, but were given an anesthetic to excite & # 39; excitement and stress & # 39; to decrease.

& # 39; The injuries of the test subjects tested resulted in seven deaths. The most common types of injuries include wear, bruising, tearing, bleeding and fractures, scientists say.

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After the tests, experts conducted detailed & # 39; necropsies & # 39; to determine exactly how the pigs were injured and killed.

PETA organized protests in America, so General Motors announced the end of animal testing in 1993.

& # 39; It's horrible to look back now and imagine that animals were deliberately slammed into walls at high speeds in auto crash tests, & # 39; said the animal rights group.

The company admitted that it had used thousands of dogs, rabbits, pigs, ferrets, rats, and mice in its laboratories for the past 10 years.

Modern crash test dummies are very advanced and can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Equipped with data recorders that measure the impact of a crash, dummies have also been adapted to larger shapes and sizes to reflect the modern population.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) China