Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall celebrates her Yemeni ancestry with UNICEF

0

Little Mix’s Jade Thirlwall says she lost ‘a lot of my identity’ after her grandfather died when she was a teenager, celebrating her Yemeni ancestry with UNICEF

Jade Thirlwall has revealed that she felt like she lost her ‘identity’ when her grandfather died when she was 13.

The grandfather of The Little Mix’s lead singer, Mohammed, was from Aden, Yemen, before moving to South Shields in 1943 and meeting Jade’s grandmother Amelia, who was from Egypt.

And Jade, 28, shared more about her Yemeni ancestry and learned about the ongoing conflict in Yemen with UNICEF when she took part in a Zoom call with Somaya, 17, from Sana’a.

Heritage: Jade Thirlwall has revealed she felt she lost her ‘identity’ when her grandfather died when she was 13

Speaking of how the singer looks up to her late grandfather as a role model, the Wings hitmaker said, “ I have very fond memories of my grandfather growing up who went to the mosque, cooked me Yemeni dishes and told me all these stories about life in Yemen.

As I got older, I feel that when my grandfather died when I was 13, I more or less lost the identity of Yemen.

“He was the most important person in my life who would truly defend my Yemeni heritage and encourage me to always acknowledge it.”

Family: The grandfather of The Little Mix's lead singer, Mohammed, was from Aden, Yemen, before moving to South Shields in 1943 (Jade pictured with her mother Norma in 2019)

Family: The grandfather of The Little Mix’s lead singer, Mohammed, was from Aden, Yemen, before moving to South Shields in 1943 (Jade pictured with her mother Norma in 2019)

Conversation: And Jade shared more about her Yemeni ancestry and learned about the ongoing conflict in Yemen with UNICEF during a Zoom conversation with Somaya, 17, from Sana'a

Conversation: And Jade shared more about her Yemeni ancestry and learned about the ongoing conflict in Yemen with UNICEF during a Zoom conversation with Somaya, 17, from Sana’a

Jade’s grandfather worked as a firefighter in the merchant navy before becoming a laborer at the port.

Jade explained the more she learns about Yemen, the more she finds a piece of herself and believes that while celebrating her heritage is important, she also wants to educate herself about the ongoing conflict in and use her profile to raise awareness of UNICEFs. vital work to support children and families.

Yemen remains the biggest crisis in the world. Almost every child in Yemen – more than 12 million – is in need of humanitarian assistance.

The spread of Covid-19 means that the country is now facing a new emergency as sanitation and clean water are scarce, while barely half of the health facilities are functioning.

Proud: 'He was the most important person in my life who would really defend my Yemeni ancestry and encourage me to always recognize it,' said Jade (pictured with her brother as a child)

Proud: ‘He was the most important person in my life who would really defend my Yemeni ancestry and encourage me to always recognize it,’ said Jade (pictured with her brother as a child)

The Little Mix star previously spoke about her Arab origins Vogue Arabia

She said, ‘My grandfather passed away and suddenly I felt like I had lost that whole part of myself. He was the person I would turn to when I was feeling down.

“He made me feel proud of who I was – he was my understanding of my Arab ancestry, I felt alone.”

Jade said she began to experience prejudice and racism in school because she was “ one of the few people of color. ”

Culture: Jade explained the more she learns about Yemen, the more she finds a piece of herself

Culture: Jade explained the more she learns about Yemen, the more she finds a piece of herself

Sweet:

Sweet: “I have very fond memories growing up of my grandfather who went to the mosque, cooked me Yemeni dishes and told me all these stories about life in Yemen,” said Jade.

The singer said she was bullied, called it P-word, and was even pinned down in the toilets so that a bindi stain could be put on her forehead.

She continued: “It has affected my mental health. I got very depressed and it caused the eating disorder that I had in school. ‘

Jade said it wasn’t until she moved to London and experienced a multicultural environment that she realized how “ it was messed up. ”

Now the singer is celebrating her Yemeni ancestry with UNICEF and introducing herself to the The UNICEF UK emergency call for children in Yemen.

Important: Yemen remains the biggest crisis in the world.  Almost every child in Yemen - more than 12 million - is in need of humanitarian assistance

Important: Yemen remains the biggest crisis in the world. Almost every child in Yemen – more than 12 million – is in need of humanitarian assistance

Advertisement