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Australian soldiers will soon be able to use a locally designed digital rifle that is five times more deadly than the lightweight rifles they are currently using in combat

New Australian army rifle FOUR TIMES on the battlefield with biometric face and fingerprint recognition

  • Lithgow Arms develops a gun of the future for Australian soldiers in battle
  • It would have a digital sensor to improve the accuracy of shooting targets
  • The lightweight 2 kg gun would also have high-tech biometric security features
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Australian soldiers could soon use a locally-designed digital rifle that is four times more deadly than the lightweight guns they now use in combat.

Lithgow Arms, which supplied the weapons used by the Gallipoli Diggers in 1915, develops a 21st century weapon that can significantly improve the accuracy of a soldier when firing their first shot.

It is working on a weapon, known internally as the Advanced Future Soldier Weapon System, with a digital sensor that better identifies targets than an experienced sniper.

Australian soldiers will soon be able to use a locally designed digital rifle that is five times more deadly than the lightweight rifles they are currently using in combat

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Australian soldiers will soon be able to use a locally designed digital rifle that is five times more deadly than the lightweight rifles they are currently using in combat

This rifle would also be & # 39; the world's most modern rifle and was expected to be ready within five years, as the Australian government focused on arming soldiers with better small arms, with advanced laser technology.

The 2 kg pistol is said to have biometric security features that recognized faces and fingerprints and digitally connected the soldier with his commander.

Thales Australia, the French parent company of Lithgow Arms, said the weapon is designed to eliminate computer-controlled opponents.

& # 39; Fast progress in digital technology brings increasing threats, but also new opportunities & # 39 ;, said Chris Jenkins, the group's CEO.

& # 39; The future Thales weapons system is accelerating the development process for an era of networked warfare. & # 39;

Neil James, Australian Defense Executive Director, who spent 31 years in the Australian Army, said that future rifles that improved shooting accuracy four times over an average range of 300 meters would save a lot on training costs.

Lithgow Arms, which supplied the cannons used by the Gallipoli diggers in 1915, develops a 21st-century weapon that can improve a soldier's accuracy by up to 400 percent when firing their first shot (pictured here is a Lee-Enfield). 303 rifle first made in 1912)
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Lithgow Arms, which supplied the cannons used by the Gallipoli diggers in 1915, develops a 21st-century weapon that can improve a soldier's accuracy by up to 400 percent when firing their first shot (pictured here is a Lee-Enfield). 303 rifle first made in 1912)

Lithgow Arms, which supplied the cannons used by the Gallipoli diggers in 1915, develops a 21st-century weapon that can improve a soldier's accuracy by up to 400 percent when firing their first shot (pictured here is a Lee-Enfield). 303 rifle first made in 1912)

& # 39; A fourfold increase in marksmanship is actually very impressive & # 39 ;, he said to Daily Mail Australia on Thursday.

# You can train most soldiers, men or women, to be good snipers, but it takes time, so any technical help you can give to improve their accuracy is great because the train is expensive for them, especially as they shoot live rounds. & # 39;

Lithgow Arms has been producing weapons since 1912 in Lithgow, in the central west of New South Wales, following a decision by the federal government to establish domestic weapon factories.

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It has been supplying guns to Diggers since the 1915 campaign in Gallipoli in Turkey, armed soldiers serving in the wars in Korea, Vietnam, Afghanistan, and Iraq.

It works on a weapon, known internally as the Future Soldier Weapon System, with a digital sensor that better identifies targets than an experienced sniper

It works on a weapon, known internally as the Future Soldier Weapon System, with a digital sensor that better identifies targets than an experienced sniper

It works on a weapon, known internally as the Future Soldier Weapon System, with a digital sensor that better identifies targets than an experienced sniper

The British-designed Lee-Enfield bolt campaign .303 was first manufactured in Lithgow in 1912 before the beginning of the First World War and remained in production until the early 1960s.

Mr. James said that no matter how advanced a weapon was, a soldier still had to operate it instead of a robot.

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& # 39; They still need a person to pull the trigger, you don't speak for artificial intelligence for obvious reasons, & # 39; he said.

French defense and space giant Thales bought a 50 percent stake in its former parent company, Australian Defense Industries, in 1999, before taking over the full acquisition in 2008.

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