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Know the onions: if you know your onions, you are the one who has all the required knowledge

From & # 39; bearcat & # 39; and & # 39; clam & # 39; to & # 39; giggling water & # 39 ;: How many of these 1920s terms can you define?

  • A list has popped up online and reveals the terms that were popular 100 years ago
  • Expressions that young people said in the 1920s were & # 39; giggling water & # 39; and & # 39; bee knees & # 39;
  • Other expressions of the day were & # 39; apple sauce, & # 39; bear cat & # 39; and & # 39; happy rags & # 39;
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A list of jargon terms that were popular 100 years ago has recently surfaced online and contains everything that & # 39; hip, cool and trendy & # 39; was in the 1920s.

The expressions people used at the time included all sorts of activities, from getting drunk to gossiping and looking good.

From & # 39; giggling water & # 39; and bee knees & # 39; to & # 39; apple sauce & # 39 ;, 5Why has revealed some of the most common words and sentences from the 20s era, as well as their meaning.

Know the onions: if you know your onions, you are the one who has all the required knowledge

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Know the onions: if you know your onions, you are the one who has all the required knowledge

Apple sauce: If you get something & # 39; apple sauce & # 39; you say that it is something that you do not believe.

& # 39; Use it to demonstrate your lack of appreciation for someone else's words & # 39 ;, reports The Atlantic Ocean.

Bearcat: According to 5Why & # 39; a bear cat is a free-spirited woman, someone who might be a bit fiery & # 39 ;.

Dictionary.com explained a bear cat: & # 39; a person or thing that fights or acts with violence or cruelty & # 39 ;.

Bees knees: The term & # 39; bee knees & # 39; is free. The term itself is part of a series of nonsense quotes from America from the 1920s, including the cat's meow, the ant's pants, and the tiger spot.

clam: If you ask someone for a bivalve shellfish, you ask him for money.

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Dewdropper: A dewdrop is a person (usually male) who is young, lazy and likes to sleep all day.

Fire extinguisher: The sentence refers to someone who puts the damper on a nice night out. They can be a chaperone or the person who says you've had enough.

Giggling water: The ban peaked in the 1920s. The term giggling water was used instead of alcohol, primarily by women.

Happy rags: Stylish people in time described their best outfits as wearing their & # 39; happy rags & # 39 ;.

& # 39; I need to see a man about a dog & # 39 ;: In line with the need to use code when referring to alcohol, this sentence meant that you would step out to buy liquor.

Giggling water: if you enjoy a drink with friends, you enjoy & # 39; giggling water & # 39;
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Giggling water: if you enjoy a drink with friends, you enjoy & # 39; giggling water & # 39;

Giggling water: if you enjoy a drink with friends, you enjoy & # 39; giggling water & # 39;

Know your onions: Someone who knows & # 39; their onions & # 39; has all prior knowledge and is a good source of gossip.

Let's blouse: According to The Flapper & # 39; s Dictionary, & # 39; let & # 39; s blouse & # 39; means that you are leaving a room, café or club.

Noodle juice: This term refers to tea. However, the word noodle in itself means head.

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Phonus Balonus: If you describe something like & # 39; phonus balonus & # 39 ;, you say it is absolutely nonsense.

Attracting the Ritz: This expression was inspired by the Ritz Hotel in London. It means getting dressed in fashion before you hit the city.

Zozzled: The slang term zozzled, that of the older word & # 39; sozzled & # 39; is to say that someone is drunk

Zozzled: The slang term zozzled, that of the older word & # 39; sozzled & # 39; is to say that someone is drunk

Zozzled: The slang term zozzled, that of the older word & # 39; sozzled & # 39; is to say that someone is drunk

Tell It To Sweeny: The term means that you do not believe what someone has said.

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Wet blanket: The use of the expression & # 39; wet blanket & # 39; is describing a person who is ruining other people's pleasure.

You kill me: This phrase of jargon means to make someone laugh or you could tell someone you think is hilarious.

Zozzled: Calling someone is & # 39; zozzled & # 39; means they are drunk. It is understood that the term comes from the older word & # 39; smothered & # 39 ;.

Spraying means spraying to spill or splash, often in a messy way.

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