Lion cub recovering in Melbourne after a very brave dentist removed four baby teeth

Ilola, the lion cub in dental treatment this morning at the Werribee Open Range zoo

A great success! Ilola, the lion cub, is in repair after a VERY brave dentist removed four teeth

  • One of Werribee's zoo-star attractions had an impromptu appointment with a dentist
  • Ilola, one of the four lion cubs, removed four baby teeth due to an infection
  • The female lion cub is recovering well after her emergency dental work

Andrew Prentice for Daily Mail Australia

It was a dental job with a difference this morning when one of the main attractions at the Werribee open zoo in Victoria spent some time in the chair.

To Ilola, the lion cub, four baby teeth were removed after suffering a painful infection because their canines took longer than normal to fall.

To the dentist's relief, the "surgery" was a success.

Ilola, the lion cub in dental treatment this morning at the Werribee Open Range zoo

Ilola, the lion cub in dental treatment this morning at the Werribee Open Range zoo

How many dentists around the world can say that they have ever spent time working on a lion cub?

How many dentists around the world can say that they have ever spent time working on a lion cub?

How many dentists around the world can say that they have ever spent time working on a lion cub?

Together with the brothers of Ilola Asali, Ato and Lwazi, the lion cubs have shown that they should see the animals after they were born last August.

The quartet was even named by the general public at the end of last year.

Asali is Swahili for honey with Ilola which translates to "get strong" in the Lesotho language.

His brothers were called Ato, who has Swahili origins and means "he who is born on Saturday."

Lwazi is Zulu for the one who has knowledge & # 39;

Female lion cubs Ilola and Asali resting in the shade in the open zoo of Werribee

Female lion cubs Ilola and Asali resting in the shade in the open zoo of Werribee

Female lion cubs Ilola and Asali resting in the shade in the open zoo of Werribee

Ilola, the lion cub, is recovering after an intrepid dentist removed four baby teeth

Ilola, the lion cub, is recovering after an intrepid dentist removed four baby teeth

Ilola, the lion cub, is recovering after an intrepid dentist removed four baby teeth

While lions are undoubtedly kings of the jungle, they are disappearing at an alarming rate worldwide.

The last two decades have seen a population decrease of 43 percent, and it is estimated that there may be as few as 20,000 lions roaming in the wild.

Kenya is one of the last bastions of the species and visitors to Zoos Victoria can help protect wildlife in Africa through the community program Beads for Wildlife.

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