Lindsey Graham Threatens Tit-for-Tat Senate Departure Like Runaway Texas Democrats to Stop Biden’s Bill

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham has said he will follow the example of the Texas House Democrats and “leave town” to vote for President Biden’s infrastructure bill.

The South Carolina senator said he was considering adopting the tactic used by Texan Democrats leaving the state to avoid supporting the GOP-developed voting legislation.

On this occasion, Graham hopes other Republicans will follow suit when it comes to President Biden and the Democrats’ $3.5 trillion infrastructure bill.

But despite the senator’s threats, it will likely make little difference to the passing of the bill, which only requires a simple majority in the Senate.

Graham said that while he supports the $950 billion infrastructure plan for roads, bridges and ports, he explained to: Fox news “The $3.5 trillion reconciliation package designed to succeed without a single Republican vote is not infrastructure.”

Instead, he claims the bill is more of a “liberal wish list” with “all kinds of new social programs that have nothing to do with infrastructure.”

Republican Senator Lindsey Graham has said he will follow the example of the Texas House Democrats and leave the city to avoid voting for Biden’s infrastructure bill.

The $3.5 trillion plan includes $600 billion in new spending on physical infrastructure and investments in climate change, health care and family service programs that President Joe Biden is committed to.

The budget would also cover the costs of expanding Medicare, addressing childcare and education, all under the banner of “human infrastructure” that Republicans say they will reject.

The rest of Biden’s ideas are gathered in the much broader multi-trillion dollar package that the Democrats themselves could approve.

Graham says the only way to pay for such a package would be “through a massive tax hike.”

On Sunday, Senator Amy Klobuchar suggested that financial incentives for states to expand voting access could also be included in the infrastructure bill.

Democrats have struggled to get their marquee reform bill passed in an evenly divided Senate, where Republicans remain united in their opposition and the rules require 60 votes to advance most laws.

Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat who chairs the powerful Senate Rules Committee, said in an interview that priority remains the legislation known as the For the People Act, which would introduce minimum standards for voting in the US, such as automatic voting. and the same. – Voter day registration, early voting and voting without excuses.

On Sunday, Senator Amy Klobuchar suggested that financial incentives for states to expand voting access could also be included in the infrastructure bill.  She was in the picture last month

On Sunday, Senator Amy Klobuchar suggested that financial incentives for states to expand voting access could also be included in the infrastructure bill. She was in the picture last month

But Klobuchar noted that Democrats can also use the process known as reconciliation to promote financial incentives for states to implement certain reforms.

Election systems have been designated as critical infrastructure, as are the country’s power plants, banks, and dams.

“You can do election infrastructure there, because that’s part of the infrastructure,” Klobuchar said. “It’s not a replacement for the For the People Act, but it’s something we can work on right away and work on now.”

Pushing election-related measures into the infrastructure bill would be a high-stakes gamble with no guarantee of success.

Graham also noted that Democrats were pushing for amnesty for millions of illegal immigrants.

“If Democrats put legalization of illegal immigrants in that bill, you’re going to have a complete run on the border. It would lead to an invasion of illegal immigrants if we put an amnesty in the $3.5 trillion bill, so I would do anything to stop that,” Graham warned.

At least 58 Democrats left Austin to avoid voting on two election laws, landing in Washington DC Monday night in two private jets (pictured)

At least 58 Democrats left Austin to avoid voting on two election laws, landing in Washington DC Monday night in two private jets (pictured)

The large group of Democratic lawmakers in Texas who fled their state Monday to avoid voting on Republicans' electoral legislation held a news conference outside the Capitol on Tuesday morning.  Lawmakers burst into gospel song 'We Shall Overcome'

The large group of Democratic lawmakers in Texas who fled their state Monday to avoid voting on Republicans’ electoral legislation held a news conference outside the Capitol on Tuesday morning. Lawmakers burst into gospel song ‘We Shall Overcome’

When asked if he would leave the Senate to avoid a vote, he confirmed that he would.

‘Yes, I would leave. I would legally use everything in my toolbox to avoid rampant inflation,” Graham confirmed, encouraging his fellow GOP senators to follow suit.

“To my Republican colleagues, maybe we can learn something from our Democratic friends in Texas when it comes to dodging a $3.5 trillion tax and spending package: get out of town,” Graham said.

“You have to have a quorum to pass a bill in the Senate,” Graham added.

Democrats will try to get around a Republican filibuster by budget reconciliation.

Under the congressional budget process, certain revenue, expenditure and debt measures can be passed with a 51-vote threshold, which is why Democrats are pushing for it.

The $3.5 trillion plan includes $600 billion in new spending on physical infrastructure and investments in climate change, health care and family service programs that President Joe Biden is pursuing

The $3.5 trillion plan includes $600 billion in new spending on physical infrastructure and investments in climate change, health care and family service programs that President Joe Biden is pursuing

However, reconciliation only requires a simple majority in the Senate. With the upper house on a 50-50 tie between Republicans and Democrats, Vice President Kamala Harris would cast the decisive vote.

Under the budget rules, Democrats could only pass the bill in the evenly divided Senate, without the usually required 60 votes.

But there’s a catch: The impartial Senate MP can decide to scrap any provision not directly related to the budget, or items whose budgetary impact is “only incidental” to their intended policy changes.

Ultimately, the Democrats would not only achieve their goal of federal standards through the infrastructure law, but could encourage some states to move in that direction.

‘Money with incentives has already passed. So let’s see what we can get approved,” Klobuchar said. “But again, that’s only part of it. Look, it’s not the whole thing, is it? But it’s a tool you don’t want to let go of.’

Republicans are united against the larger infrastructure package and the electoral law. They say the latter represents a democratic coup that amounts to a federal takeover of elections, which are administered at the state and local levels.

Republicans blocked an attempt to debate the bill last month, and Democrats will have to decide whether to change Senate rules to eventually pass the bill.

Last week, dozens of Texas Democratic state legislators deliberately missed a special legislative session aimed at breaking a quorum and blocking Republican efforts to accelerate new electoral integrity laws, which Democrats claimed amounted to voter suppression.

The Democrats’ departure paralyzed the Texas state house as the legislature requires a two-thirds quorum of lawmakers to be present to conduct business.

Graham continued: “If I don’t show up to stop the $3.5 trillion infrastructure package, which has nothing to do with infrastructure and is a tax and spending dream of the socialist left, he will.

Graham’s main concern is that the bill would push inflation through the roof.

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