Life was easier when people hunted for food

Life was easier when people hunted for food: switching from rinsing to farming has made our working week ten hours longer, revealing contemporary tribal studies

  • The agricultural revolution has been announced as an important turning point in human history
  • Came at the expense of those who made the change because it was more demanding
  • Hunter collectors spend 20 hours a week feeding themselves
  • This is ten hours less than those who started farming and worked a lot more

Switching from hunting to farming made life more difficult and forced people to work longer, a Cambridge University study on modern tribes claims.

The agricultural revolution has been announced as an important turning point in the history of humanity, as it led to stable settlements and allowed culture to flourish.

But scientists discovered that it was not without cost because the hard work was less productive and it took longer to make the same amount of food as a hunter-gatherer.

In a study of contemporary Agta tribes spread over remote regions of the Philippines, they found that hunter-gatherers were eating 20 hours a week while those who had recently taken up farming needed 30 hours to get the same amount to get.

The research goes against the generally accepted view that the advent of agriculture was good for people and made life easier, and researchers still need to understand why.

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Scientists from the University of Cambridge studied ten Agta groups in the Philippines and found that hunter-gatherers were given food 20 hours a week. Those who had recently taken up farming took 30 hours to get the same amount

Scientists from the University of Cambridge studied ten Agta groups in the Philippines and found that hunter-gatherers were given food 20 hours a week. Those who had recently taken up farming took 30 hours to get the same amount

The so-called neolithic revolution – about 11,000 years ago – brought radical changes to the human population when they settled and established roots in a specific area, something that was previously impossible during the nomadic way of life.

Contemporary equivalents still exist in some parts of the world, and tribes still survive with the hunter-gatherer approach.

Scientists from the University of Cambridge studied the ten Agta tribes.

Dr. Mark Dyble, lead author of the study, says: & # 39; For a long time it was assumed that the transition from foraging to agriculture was an advance, allowing people to escape a difficult and precarious way of life.

The agricultural revolution has been announced as an important turning point in the history of humanity, as it led to stable settlements and allowed culture to flourish. But it was not without its costs, because scientists found that the hard work that cultivated the land lasted longer (stock)

The agricultural revolution has been announced as an important turning point in the history of humanity, as it led to stable settlements and allowed culture to flourish. But it was not without its costs, because scientists found that the hard work that cultivated the land lasted longer (stock)

The agricultural revolution has been announced as an important turning point in the history of humanity, as it led to stable settlements and allowed culture to flourish. But it was not without its costs, because scientists found that the hard work that cultivated the land lasted longer (stock)

WHAT WAS THE AGRICULTURAL REVOLUTION?

The agricultural revolution has been announced as an important turning point in the history of humanity, as it led to stable settlements and allowed culture to flourish.

The so-called neolithic revolution brought about profound changes in human populations when they established themselves and established roots in a specific area, something that was previously impossible during the nomadic way of life.

It started around 11,000 years ago and spread over 5,000 years around the world and was omnipresent almost everywhere in all societies.

It reached the UK around 4,000 years ago and only a few bags of people still hold a hunter-gatherer lifestyle.

& # 39; But as soon as anthropologists started working with hunter-gatherers, they began to question this story and found that collectors actually enjoy quite a lot of free time. Our data provides some of the clearest support for this idea to date. & # 39;

His team followed a total of 359 people while they were busy with their daily activities, such as odd jobs, leisure and childcare and outside work.

The study found that average Agta adults spent around 24 hours a week on work outside the camp, about 20 hours a week with household chores and about 30 hours of free daylight.

But the researchers discovered that time allocation varied considerably between adults.

The leisure time was lowest at the age of 30 and then increased steadily.

Women spent more time working outside the camp and also suffered from household chores and childcare.

The study found no explanation as to why men did not work so often in the field.

Dr. Dyble says: & # 39; This is perhaps because farming work is more easily shared by the sexes than by hunting or fishing.

& # 39; Or there may be other reasons why men are not prepared or can spend more time working outside the camp. This needs to be further investigated. & # 39;

The research was published in the journal Nature communication.

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